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RE: Farewell Punter, it's been a pleasure mate!

 
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RE: Farewell Punter, it's been a pleasure mate! - 12/12/2012 6:05:59 PM   
Goodfella


Posts: 17029
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: North Devon
The final test starts tomorrow then with the chance for England to make some groundbreaking history by winning only their second series in the sub-continent since the mid-1980s. It seems that Stuart Broad will again miss out with a bruised heel this time ruining his chances of a recall and paceman Steven Finn has a disc strain in his back so potentially he will miss out as well so there could be a place in the team for Tim Bresnan, who I would go with as he also bolsters the batting and I'd like to see what he could do with the reverse swing, or Graham Onions, or Kent spinner James Tredwell could be another slow bowling option.

It sounds like the Nagpur wicket may be similar to the one in Eden Gardens. Quite competitive with bounce and carry starting to appear in the later days, spin will still be as equally effective though as this is the sub-continent after all and England should select the same team with Bresnan replacing Finn if he's not fit.

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Post #: 4441
RE: Farewell Punter, it's been a pleasure mate! - 14/12/2012 12:44:31 AM   
Goodfella


Posts: 17029
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: North Devon
It's rare that I agree with Kevin Pietersen, as I have frequently made clear in this thread, but I'm with him today. That is a truly dreadful wicket in Nagpur. "Sporting". "Competitive." No these are not the words I'd use to describe that track. Here are some more apt ones - unpredictable, shoddy, dangerous. Yep that last one I fear could come into play with some high or low blows, did anyone else see those early deliveries to Pietersen from Sharma just drop off, get one of those come back into the glove with the carry and that's a couple of broken fingers. It seems to me the Indians have designed a wicket that no-one, not England or the rest of the world, could have expected.

Putting that to one side though, I wouldn't have batted first after looking at that, and certainly not with the way India have been batting of late. I'd have put them straight in under the spotlight on a surface that even they didn't seem to sure of and battered them with some Anderson and Bresnan with a sprinkle of Panesar in the early hours and brought Swann in later, Root is a dangerous spinner early on, he floats them in there and I'd like to have seen how their top order would have fared. Compton's dismissal was incredibly poor, he could have done a thousand different things with that ball, it was the prize one of the innings, an absolute sitter in the channel and he casually flicks his bat in the direction of it, I was very disappointed in that. Cook was never out, that was a complete travesty, pitching outside the line and going across leg anyway? How do you give that out? Sharma's appeal was half-hearted, everyone else looked less than convinced and Dharmasena saw fit to give him out because two balls earlier he may but didn't have Cook trapped lbw. I don't need DRS to know that wasn't out, a very poor decision.

Trott and Pietersen brought some life to a flatlining England innings in which they went almost seven overs to get into double figures. Pietersen wasn't even his fluent self though and seemed nervous to attack the pitch of the ball, usually a player who throws it all out there, that was for me his best innings of the series because in very tough conditions he didn't act like an ego-maniac, he kept his ground and steadied the ship, give me that any day over his double-hundred cause we really fucking needed that! Eventually though he fluttered didn't he, as he always does? Lost patience and threw his bat out to Ohja and was caught by a diving Jadeja, it was a good innings but a further cool head could have got him a ton and England some more confidence. Bell just gave his wicket away in laughable fashion, he didn't even look like he knew where the field was, should know where short extra cover is to a delivery like that and he's going to need a big second innings or even his most die-hard fans, of which I am, know they're will be plenty enough questioning his spot to make a difference.

Root did well on debut (old habits die hard of England playing batsmen in positions they don't bat in at domestic level, Root is an opener in all competitions of the game for Yorkshire), he saw off a late storm from Sharma and alongside the unflappable Prior they grinded out quite an intriguing position for England on this deck, get to 300 and this has actually been a pretty decent score, fall quickly and we're staring an uphill task in the face. It's going to be a huge second and third day again that's for sure!

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RE: Farewell Punter, it's been a pleasure mate! - 14/12/2012 7:52:35 AM   
impqueen


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Joined: 24/7/2006
 
The Cook "dismissal” was an absolute travesty.

I agree with winning the toss and putting India in, even if the wicket wasn't as ridiculous as it is, with the exception of the first test England have done well to put them under pressure first time out.

Root had I think (given conditions) a superb innings really pleased for him and Swann got a very good 56. Bell…I like him a lot but this Series his selection has left a lot to be desired, maybe his mind is elsewhere with his newborn?

So 330 on a shitty wicket? I'm happy with that, over to Monty, Jimmy and Swann.

< Message edited by impqueen -- 14/12/2012 7:54:30 AM >


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RE: Farewell Punter, it's been a pleasure mate! - 14/12/2012 12:14:28 PM   
Professor Moriarty

 

Posts: 9869
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From: the waters of Casablanca
Anyone think the title of this thread may soon become Farewell Sachin, it's been a pleasure mate!

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RE: Farewell Punter, it's been a pleasure mate! - 14/12/2012 9:58:17 PM   
Goodfella


Posts: 17029
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: North Devon

quote:

ORIGINAL: Professor Moriarty

Anyone think the title of this thread may soon become Farewell Sachin, it's been a pleasure mate!

quote:


So 330 on a shitty wicket? I'm happy with that, over to Monty, Jimmy and Swann.


Been saying that for sometime now, he'll retire from international cricket after this series. He's been a truly amazing player to watch over the years, especially growing up as a cricket fan during his best years, his 169 versus the South Africans on the hazardous track in Cape Town in the 1996 is the one that sticks in my memory of my best, I was only 3 when he knocked England around at Old Trafford which probably sticks better in the memories of other English cricket fans of that generation and even though I was only 9 when he did the South Africans up so well with his array of cover drives I remember it well because Knott's brother who coached us talked about that innings so much when we did batting practice, it pretty much became his forte.

A very, very fine fightback from England then, something we have not seen much of this year, least of all in the sub-continent. It just goes to show what the confidence of being on the back victory can do for you in this game, as perhaps the same for defeat. Joe Root played well for a brilliant 73 on debut, he can be very proud of that, I didn't expect anywhere near that from such a young player so soon, he played test cricket the way it was meant to be played this morning which for a young player in this modern era with such big-hitting abilities was good to see, he pushed and prodded through the covers, he stayed upright and played the spin very well. Prior and Swann played very well too, two lower-order all-rounders who can form ferocious partnerships of real velocity and both really knock the ball around, I've been impressed with how well both have adapted to conditions out there and their contribution together of 100-plus runs, not to mention Prior's century-partnership with Root changed the face of the back of England's innings and as I said yesterday, a score of 300 plus on this wicket would turn out to be very decent and that it was.

England actually started quite tentatively with the ball, Cook opting for a more defensive field, obviously not overly confident as to what the Indians new about the surface and what it was going to do and wary that 330 was not perhaps the score he had initially hoped for when he won the toss and elected to bat. That didn't matter too much as Anderson got one to get a little low and deceive and rip out Sehwag's middle stump, that effectively called India out and another tremendous new-ball day for Anderson ensued as he claimed a regular victim in Tendulkar for just 2 as he found that reverse swing to get the little master to completely miss and got his third wicket of the day in the form as the outswinger has Gambhir on the front foot and he nicks through to Prior. His figures of 9-2-24-3 have every past critic of Anderson and his ability to lead England to win matches away from home looking away in embarassment, he has been fantastic, especially in these last two tests where he has been able to use the slowness and the late movement of the pitch to his advantage, he has been devestating and economical. Panesar contributed wonderfully tying up the Indians with quick, devilish spin from the fingers and Swann took a solitary wicket whilst all the time looking dangerous as the Indians tried to score runs whilst risking playing across him.

England are in charge now, there is no doubt. Dhoni and Kohli, the latter of which is due an innings this series, are perhaps their last fort of truly making a real match of this. What follows is a mix of lower order all-rounders and non-batsmen, if England can get India out for around 250 or less, and that is arguably at worse then with a draw still sealing a series victory for us we will be in complete control. But I have a feeling about Cook and the way he has captained this series, I have a feeling he will go for the jugular. Cook wants 3-1, not 2-1. This could be an interesting three days (if it goes that long) of test cricket.

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RE: Farewell Punter, it's been a pleasure mate! - 15/12/2012 11:17:05 AM   
Professor Moriarty

 

Posts: 9869
Joined: 6/10/2005
From: the waters of Casablanca
Good day for India, great final hour for England. This test is well poised. Small advantage England?

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RE: Farewell Punter, it's been a pleasure mate! - 15/12/2012 4:46:40 PM   
Goodfella


Posts: 17029
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: North Devon

quote:

ORIGINAL: Professor Moriarty

Good day for India, great final hour for England. This test is well poised. Small advantage England?


I would say so. England know what they have to do now, get those last couple of wickets quickly and then preferably bat well into the first session of day five. That's not an easy task for England, especially on this murderous wicket and with the fact that looking back at Pakistan and Sri Lanka this kind of pressure cooker really got to our batsmen, we have a deeper order this test which may prove crucial but if we can get 300 we know this one is pretty much in the bag either way. India can't just settle for a draw and have to go after it, Kohli and Dhoni did that very well today. I said Kohli was due an innings and he got one, where he flexed his muscles of test cricket and himself and the Indian skipper dropped anchor, and stayed there. The pair played some fine strokes but mainly just didn't resist and tried to get India to the next level in their innings, the run-out of Dhoni ruined the masterplan though with his nemesis Cook seeing him out for 99.

Tomorrow will prove to be the most crucial day in this test.

_____________________________

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If you can quote the rules, then you can obey them.


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RE: Farewell Punter, it's been a pleasure mate! - 17/12/2012 9:40:45 AM   
impqueen


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Really pleased for Bell.

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RE: Farewell Punter, it's been a pleasure mate! - 17/12/2012 9:54:27 AM   
impqueen


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Nice one lads!  I thought we'd get a kickin'

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RE: Farewell Punter, it's been a pleasure mate! - 17/12/2012 10:21:05 AM   
Professor Moriarty

 

Posts: 9869
Joined: 6/10/2005
From: the waters of Casablanca
Lest we not forget, they were pretty badly tonked in the first game. So to win the series 2-1 and to be quite in control of that final match was a fantastic turnaround, credit due to the management, captain and team.

Great round off to a fantastic year of sport. Am looking forward to sitting down to watch SPOTY tonight (recorded it as I was watching Barca v. Athletico... oh and I sometimes get a bit bored of their "funny" bits if they do that).

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RE: Farewell Punter, it's been a pleasure mate! - 17/12/2012 3:15:14 PM   
Goodfella


Posts: 17029
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: North Devon
Hugely historic day to be an England cricket fan, been waiting a long time to see that and savoured every moment, it's a very sweet way to polish off what has been a very difficult year, there's still no doubting that the test record of 5-8-2 this year has not been anywhere near the standard England have spent the last three years setting but it will have to do, there is no point living in the past to a degree and we got a huge monkey off our backs by coming to the sub-continent, batting very well and not being dominated by spin, with the exception of the first test we have been the better team, not by a great margin as we were when India came to England last year, but one wide enough to know it wasn't all about a toss or about luck. It was also the start of a new era with a new captain, a changing team to adapt to conditions and a coaching restructure. Cook did an absolute brilliant job in his series debut both with the willow and with his abilities as captain, plenty of us questioned his appointment which seemed more out of natural succession than because of qualities deemed to make him capable of leading England to victories, he has surpassed that though from the start of the second test and his attacking nature has been a breath of fresh air for an England team that is usually of more of a defensive approach.

I'm not really too sure why India wasted an hour and a bit on the morning of day four batting for a paltry 30-odd runs, they'd have been better declaring just then to give themselves the best shot at bowling us out for a low score on a tricky wicket and then maybe having a day and a bit to chase a total. Perhaps they thought Ashwin would go out there and score sum runs, it's certainly his forte but I'm not really sure what mindset Fletcher and Dhoni sent their lower middle-order out there with, especially given that they declared anyway with Ashwin still at the crease.

It played into England's hands really and they took full advantage. Cook 13 off 93, Compton 34 off 135, Trott 143 off 310, Pietersen 6 off 30, Bell 116 off 306, Root 20 off 56. An average strike rate of the late 20s to early thirties. England were dealt their card and they dropped anchor, much like Kohli and Dhoni had for India earlier in the test. It was great to see Bell back in the runs, I see the critics have gone quiet again, his slowest test century to date but one that was needed, he was stoic in his run scoring but played some clever shots and saw England through. Trott played a typical Trott ton, never being troubled from ball one and Root saw us out with a wonderful swept six off Ashwin, his and Compton's performances have made up arguably the best trio of debuts you could hope for (Cook, Compton, Root) and have given England plenty of thought before heading off to New Zealand. Compton already has his but Root should get his incremental contract now too.

I expect Dhoni to resign as India test captain in the near future and Tendulkar to retire after this series.

_____________________________

"It is the Shawshank Redemption! Just with more tunneling through shit and less fucking redemption."

If you can quote the rules, then you can obey them.


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RE: Farewell Punter, it's been a pleasure mate! - 24/12/2012 12:32:32 AM   
Goodfella


Posts: 17029
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: North Devon
Upon reflection of the mini, pre-Christmas break T20 series in India, I think both matches nicely summed up the fortunes of this particurlar format of the game. High octane, high energy, thrills and spills for the impatient and instant-action hungry. In the first game I thought England had done enough setting India 159 to chase but these deceptive wickets in India have not made life easy to figure out a decent score and some wayward bowling from England helped India establish quickly, this is a fresher and younger T20 England team and it was very much that in Pune, Jos Buttler was the highlight of the match with his 33 not out from 21 balls with three sixes of his version of the infamous Dilscoop where he steps across his offstump and scoops the ball up and over leg, all the way into the stands. It's both a ridiculous and remarkable shot, I've seen him do it live three times by my count and you just can't see it coming, it's one of those ones that if you attempt it and pull it off your on the back pages the next day, attempt it and fail and the wicketkeeper usually has to duck your polaxed and spinning legstump, especially if it's someone like Lasith Malinga bowling.

Yesterday was a fine run-chase by England. Really exhilirating stuff, the right approach and way to play a big T20 innings chase. Forceful and defiant start which included a lovely knock of 50 from 32 balls by Michael Lumb who had been undone by spin earlier in the week but here he timed his shots well and ran well between the wickets. We hesistated in the middle overs and I won't understand why needed big runs after losing the wicket of Luke Wright swiftly we chose to not promote Buttler again, go after it, I want to see some attacking instinct in this game, and in the end it was Buttler and Morgan, with a series of great shots including a winning six with a ball to spare, that saw us home. It was only really a taster, well attended by the T20-mad Indians but two games that felt quite out of place as England flew home today to be with their families before returning to India in the New Year for the ODI series, Ashley Giles' debut as head coach.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/0/cricket/20830347

Sachin makes his first decision in his steps towards retirement as he ends his one-day international career, one that has been illusteraous to say the least. I'd rather pay tribute to him fully when he leaves international cricket on the whole, which I still think will be fairly soon.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/0/cricket/20802765

This appointment tells me two things; we wank to attract more overseas signings and we want the focus to be primarily on one-day trophies. Nosworthy is a victim of South Africa's apartheid ban days and joins us from the Highveld Lions and Nashua Titans, with three T20 trophies between them, where he was head coach and director of cricket. I'm not against this, he's young, fresh-minded and is looking to make his mark in English cricket but we have never won a county championship at Taunton, and everyone down there that I know is desperate to succeed there. I would absolutely love to add Ricky Ponting to the signings of Alverio Petersen and Abdur Rehman for next summer and I hope that's Nosworthy's first assignment but we will just have to wait and see.

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RE: Farewell Punter, it's been a pleasure mate! - 24/12/2012 12:45:11 AM   
boaby

 

Posts: 2808
Joined: 29/12/2006
From: Aberdeenshire

quote:

ORIGINAL: Goodfella

... we wank to attract more overseas signings...




Just what sort of signings will be attracted by that?


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Post #: 4453
RE: Farewell Punter, it's been a pleasure mate! - 24/12/2012 1:05:37 AM   
Goodfella


Posts: 17029
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: North Devon

quote:

ORIGINAL: boaby


quote:

ORIGINAL: Goodfella

... we wank to attract more overseas signings...




Just what sort of signings will be attracted by that?



Australians?



_____________________________

"It is the Shawshank Redemption! Just with more tunneling through shit and less fucking redemption."

If you can quote the rules, then you can obey them.


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Post #: 4454
RE: Farewell Punter, it's been a pleasure mate! - 29/12/2012 7:14:10 PM   
Goodfella


Posts: 17029
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: North Devon


A sad day for the world of cricket as we mourn the loss of former England captain Tony Greig who passed away in the early hours of the morning from a heart attack, just several months after being diagnosed with lung cancer. Greig was one of England's finest batsmen and captains of all time, he also took 141 test wickets with his virtually part-time eclectic of off-spin and medium pace, he scored 3,599 test runs at an average of just over 40 and led England from 1972-1977. He was a real character of the game, a diverse and opinionated captain who never shied away from a challenge, his own South African heritage tantamount to that over the apartheid ban that had led him the way of English cricket. He was not a man or player without controversey, his "grovel" comments regarding the West Indians in 1976 and his eventual residing of the England captaincy to join Kerry Packer's revolutionary World Series Cricket. The latter enthused some to call his comments about Kevin Pietersen earlier this year "hypocritical." They couldn't be further from the truth, Greig and many others including West Indian stars, left their countries to join Packer's new model to help improve cricketers general rights as sportsmen and help improve both the entertainment and value of the game, it worked, you wouldn't have T20 cricket without it, counties wouldn't have been able to make in some cases almost 25% of their fiscal year profit without one-day shirt sales and you wouldn't have perhaps the most important thing of all to a loyal international cricketer - the central contract. There were many things wrong with it, but in the long run the good has slowly outweighed the bad and I truly believe, especially given the era, it was never about greed, not the way it is today.

Obviously, due to my age, I never had the privelege of watching Greig live although I have several DVDs and both my father and grandfather were big fans of him but I loved his commentary on the game, an Australian and South African analyst and commentator and a frequent guest on TMS, he always spoke his mind and was a very intelligent and mature analyst of the game, he knows it better than many and his thoughts and comments will be sadly missed by many.

Thoughts and feelings with Tony and his family and friends during this difficult time. Hopefully there will be some fitting tributes at forthcoming international matches, Greig was unique in being loved by so many cricketing nations who share so many fierce rivalries with one another which is why I believe this man will be one of the true pillars of the international and the game as a whole.

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RE: Farewell Punter, it's been a pleasure mate! - 1/1/2013 12:43:19 PM   
emogeek


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RIP CMJ...

http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/0/cricket/20881346



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RIP C.M.J. - 1/1/2013 7:16:14 PM   
Goodfella


Posts: 17029
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: North Devon

quote:

ORIGINAL: emogeek

RIP CMJ...

http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/0/cricket/20881346




The second very sad loss in the matter of just three days for the cricketing world. Christopher Martin-Jenkins was one of the voices of English cricket commentary, along with Brian Johnston, Jonathan Agnew andHenry Blofeld, he was quirky, eccentric, well-spoken and he was part of the defining legacy that makes TMS what it is today, ultimately the only timeless sports commentary since the invasion of the likes of Sky. He was also a very fine cricket writer, one of the best of his time and the time afterwards, anyone who reads Wisden or watches Cricket Writers on TV during the summer will be well aware of this.

He will be greatly missed and this opportunity should be taken to pay tribute to a true gentleman of the game, a very talented, honest and intelligent cricket lover, thoughts and feelings with his family, notably his son Robin who left his cricketing career with Sussex last year to take up a teaching position and spend more time with his family.

_____________________________

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RE: RIP C.M.J. - 4/1/2013 5:46:00 PM   
Goodfella


Posts: 17029
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: North Devon
Who's been watching the cricket then? South Africa have absolutely hammered New Zealand in the first test at Newlands, marking all kinds of records, as they won within just three days. Jacques Kallis passed 13,000 test runs making him now, undeniably, the best all-rounder in the world, perhaps of all-time (we could have all sorts of debates) and the South African seam attack eat New Zealand up on the first day for just 45 runs with Vernon Philander doing the main strain of damage with figures of 6-3-7-5, figures that wouldn't even be reflective of a one-sided T20 match, Philander actually came into the test with a knee problem and had to pass some late fitness tests, but if that lulled New Zealand into any kind of false sense of security they were more than just fools as Philander devestated with his ability to swing the ball both ways and his tricky pace with only Kane Williamson reaching double figures for New Zealand. South Africa went on to make 347-8 before declaring with Alvero Petersen scoring his fourth test century with 106 from 170 balls and Amla (60), Kallis (60) and De Villiers (67) also contributing. New Zealand were then bowled out for 275 to seal South Africa's win although Dean Brownlie did hit his maiden test century for the Kiwis to offer the slimmest of silver linings as life post the captaincy of Ross Taylor continues to crumble, I will not for the life of me understand how Cricket New Zealand allowed that situation to happen as things were starting to improve, albeit slowly, under the leadership of Taylor. Now from going a couple of steps forward they now seem to have gone about eight back and with an England test team visiting on the horizon on the back of a historic and morale-boosting series win in India they must be genuinely concerned about how much further they will fall down the test rankings this coming year. If, and when, the Test Championship comes into contention on the international stage, New Zealand face real problems from player and board bust-ups to lingering crowds to a struggling domestic system facing deep competition from the modern T20 era and state and grade cricket in neighbouring Australia.

Australia have also confirmed the exit of another batsman of legendary status this past week, Mike Hussey will retire after the final test against Sri Lanka. Hussey, or 'Mr Cricket', retires as another Australian batsman (like Langer, Hayden and Ponting before him) with an average over 50. Hussey has been a huge contributor to Australia's successes over the better part of the last eight or so years, he's scored 19 test centuries and will be remembered, with both admiration and humiliation, by England fans for the way he bossed our wayward bowlers in the Australian Ashes whitewash of 2006-07, I remember he made Flintoff look like a sunday league bowler after one too many pints (and yes I appreciate the irony of that statement but you know what I mean!) where he cut, pulled, hooked and drove Flintoff all over Adelaide, at one point centre-hooking a six almost out of the ground. He's come back from adversity on several occasions, most notably against us two years ago in the Ashes, and it is those kind of attributes that won him the much-reverred title of Mr Cricket. It's sad to see him depart, you feel that this is perhaps the final piece in the real end of that era of Australian cricket, Clarke arrived around a similar time but at a younger age and you feel now like he is the only familiar face from that later period of test and one-day dominance.

England bowling coach David Saker has also rejected the position of replacing new England one-day coach Ashley Giles as Warwickshire's director of cricket. I'm pleased about this, I'm a big fan of Saker, I think he's played a big part in the recent successes of England's seam and bowling unit as a whole, his own experiences, influences and coaching abilities have rounded Jimmy Anderson, Tim Bresnan and Steven Finn especially into world-beating test bowlers and his name should be in contention to replace Andy Flower in the long-term in my view, along with Giles, Richard Halsall and Mickey Arthur. We're a long way off from that yet though.

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"It is the Shawshank Redemption! Just with more tunneling through shit and less fucking redemption."

If you can quote the rules, then you can obey them.


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Post #: 4458
India v England ODIs - 11/1/2013 8:08:34 PM   
Goodfella


Posts: 17029
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: North Devon
Absolutely delighted with the progress England made today in the first of the ODI series, life under Ashley Giles has got off to a very, very promising start. It was a hard-fought, close battle but one England richly deserved and after rewriting history in the test series last year, England have got off on exactly the right foot in the ODI series whereas last time England were out there in 2008 we got thumped 5-0 in the ODI conclusion, and one we also richly deserved there.

What I liked first off, aside from the obvious decision upon winning the toss and looking at the flat deck and choosing to bat in the sunlight, was the team selection. As I've said all along to compete in the sub-continent and places like Australia on the ODI stage you have to have the weight of runs behind you, everyone has to contribute in the top order and if your going to select bat first you have to set a sizeable target. You can get away with 250 or 260 on our wickets but abroad, and especially in these conditions where spin is perhaps the only truly effective weapon of a fielding team, you need at least 280. You have to set yourselves that target every time you play 50-over cricket, no matter where that may be, you have to strive to bat big and long, you have to be willing to adapt and you have to be able to pick the line of the ball and the time and placement of shot - no-one did that better than Alastair Cook today, he's the best in the world at it at the moment. Who did it badly for England? Kevin Pietersen. He could have gotten out twice before he eventually did. Mistiming shots, ahead of the ball, you need a good pair of hands at mid-wicket when KP's at the crease because he'll usually give you one or two, not to say he didn't contribute though with some aggressive and attracking strokeplay.

I felt England had the right balance in their top order. Thought more would be said earlier this morning about Giles and Cook picking Bell to open over KP, but there won't be any noise now after Bell's 85, and what an acclompished innings that was? Who says the orthodox and traditional batting approach is dead in modern-era one-day cricket? Bell is proof that it's not that's why. With him going through the gears and his strokes at one end with the occasional deft and elegant reverse sweep at one end and Cook at the other cutting and pulling off his heels with equisite timing India were always going to be facing a task and they couldn't seem to find anyone who could make the ball work, in the end when Virat Kohli has to come in for an over you know your in a spot of bother. The best partnership of our 325 was not Bell and Cook's record-setting 158 though it was the fifth-wicket partnership of Patel and Kieswetter that produced 70 runs though. This is what I like about Cook as a captain and Giles as a coach (this was a stalwart approach at Warwickshire over the past two years as well) - go for it. Don't be stupid but if you're going to make it big, then make it big. Anything a little short, anything a little wide, any leg-cutter that wasn't timed, the pair of them dispatched the ball to all four corners of the ground. Patel has settled very well into his new role in this England team as an enforcer with the bat and a grinder with the ball. It was important Kieswetter resumed his duties as well, another player who has had more than his fair share of criticism later, a relegation would have knocked his confidence and he's a player who's inspiration comes from being given the chance, siezing it and playing with it, he did that very well today and showed what a continuing safe pair of gloves he is behind the stumps.

The bowling on a flat, lifeless wickets was very impressive as well. It was hard-working, especially from the likes of Bresnan who struggled with the conditions early on. Tredwell was someone I wanted to see on the plane before the tour even started and hopefully after today people saw a little of why. He can be deceiving with his flight and speed, he does turn it and he forces the batsman to get out of his crease, he's experienced, a smart head and he's always been around the England sides most of his career, yet outcomes have just never offered him much of a series of regular chances, he's getting that now and hopefully this series will show what a good bowler he is. Dernbach is someone for me that you just cannot leave out of the England ODI teams. Some, in fact quite a few, don't like him although I can't figure out if that's just mainly because he's another South African but that debate is too long in the tooth and too irrelevant now. Fact is he's one of the best strike bowlers in the world, his array of weapons in the early and later overs make him an option you don't want to leave sitting in the pavilion. The yorker, the full toss, the leg-cutter, even seen a few slower bouncers of late from him. When you have a situation like you do today with India chasing a capable 13 from 6 you give the ball to Dernbach, I don't care if someone like Bresnan is sitting out there on 8-40 with one over to spare, you give it to Dernbach. His variety and the batsman's weaknesses against it will kill it dead, you cannot chase a score against that kind of bowling, unless you have 6 or under to get, and even then there's a good chance he'll get you trying to pull the leg-cutter.

Well done to Giles, Cooky and the whole England team, that was a great show. Can't wait for Tuesday's match.

< Message edited by Goodfella -- 11/1/2013 8:09:33 PM >


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Post #: 4459
RE: India v England ODIs - 12/1/2013 3:27:16 PM   
impqueen


Posts: 7474
Joined: 24/7/2006
So I missed that ODI

I have however caught a couple of hours of the SA/NZ Series and seriously how are New Zealand that bad? Or are South Africa that good?

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Post #: 4460
RE: India v England ODIs - 12/1/2013 4:31:21 PM   
Goodfella


Posts: 17029
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: North Devon

quote:

ORIGINAL: impqueen

So I missed that ODI

I have however caught a couple of hours of the SA/NZ Series and seriously how are New Zealand that bad? Or are South Africa that good?


Bit of both if you ask me.

New Zealand have been experiencing problems, both on and off the field, for the better part of the last year which concluded Ross Taylor's resignation of international captaincy in all formats after NZC refused his request for them to consider him remaining test captain, but not ODI and T20 captain, now I appreciate my support for him may make me look a bit of a hypocrite given Pietersen's circumstances and my views on that but this is different, Taylor wasn't asking too pick when he plays, he was asking for the burden of captaincy across all formats to be lifted. Under Taylor's New Zealand had one two ODI series and beaten Australia in their own backyard and reaching the semi-final of the World Cup and things were starting to improve slightly, the team appeared to rally around him and his own personal story helped inspire the youngsters in the team like Doug Bracewell and Trent Boult. Now I'm not saying Brendon McCullum isn't a capable leader but he's getting on at the age of 32 and has been appointed to try and paper over the cracks, no disrespect to him but if he was a serious long-term contender for captaincy he would have been given the job four years ago, he's there because he is the best option now Taylor's gone but also the only option which is not neccessarily a good thing. But that's really just the tip of the iceberg with regards to the problems facing New Zealand cricket at the minute. There's a lot of player and management unrest, a distinct lack of communication and the appointment of John Buchanan as director of cricket hasn't been met with the warmest of welcomes.

As for on the field, yes South Africa are probably just too good for most in the world now, let alone the sinking ship that is New Zealand. Comparing the top orders and not just their stats (minus Taylor who's future is unclear and if they can't get him back on board as captain, I hope someone inside NZC has the sense to fight for his future as a player as he is the best batsman in the team by a long way, the impressive young Brownlie is a talent but runs cannot be sat upon his shoulders at this stage in his career and opener McCullum has enough pressure leading this team as it is, he's already had to resign the gloves) is a good read and I think Hashim Amla's innings yesterday summed up his place as the best batsman in the world at the moment (Cook a very, very close second), I'm going to assume you enjoyed it as much as me impy?

We will beat New Zealand across the course of this year 5-0. It will be calm, collected and clinical. It's not usual I'd make such a bold prediction at this stage, especially off the back of such a shaky 2012, but with New Zealand cricket the way it is I'm pretty confident that even Derbyshire could give them a serious game in Hamilton right now.

_____________________________

"It is the Shawshank Redemption! Just with more tunneling through shit and less fucking redemption."

If you can quote the rules, then you can obey them.


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Post #: 4461
RE: India v England ODIs - 12/1/2013 7:30:57 PM   
Goodfella


Posts: 17029
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: North Devon
As for this....

http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/0/cricket/20929898

....I do wish cricket would have SoundFX like in the NFL because I would love to know the exchange of words right there!

Marlon Samuels is not a man, either in size or attitude, that you want to try pushing around! Thankfully cricket isn't like football and people like Shane Warne, because of their history and stature within the game, can't just boss and bully others around. Warne got what he deserved and his "I was too passionate for the team" argument is a big pile of crap.

_____________________________

"It is the Shawshank Redemption! Just with more tunneling through shit and less fucking redemption."

If you can quote the rules, then you can obey them.


(in reply to Goodfella)
Post #: 4462
RE: India v England ODIs - 15/1/2013 10:24:07 PM   
Goodfella


Posts: 17029
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: North Devon
Very poor from England this morning, that was everything the first ODI wasn't, that was a mixture of a lack of focus, intensity and a combination of some basic mistakes that have in the past plagued England in the sub-continent. Not picking the line and length of the delivery for example, something that Bell, Pietersen and Morgan all fell too. There was also Jadeja (who was the clear man of the match, even with sparkling innings from Raina and Dhoni) and Ashwin who twisted and turned the ball to produce far too much malice for an ordinary England to cope with, there were cameos of the England from Friday as Pietersen slogged away at his middrift, Root carved up loose deliveries and Kieswetter and Patel tried to pick up where they left off before the weekend but it was all too little really for England and you felt the path they were on almost the second after Bell tried to drive a wide delivery off Kumar and was caught behind.

England's confidence with the bat wasn't helped by the way India finished off their innings, much the way England did on Friday, with devestating beauty. Dhoni is an absolute joy to watch when he's smashing it all around the park, he looks totally at ease at the crease, he is the boyhood idol of Indian cricket, the celebrity face but he has been looking a bit weary in the recent months as India struggle to maintain a dominating influence on the field in the international sport, but today was a different story. He drops to one knee and slaps Dernbach over cover for six with remarkable ease, he dinks Tredwell over mid-on for four as if it's a simple defensive stroke. He's one of the few players in the world who have mastered all formats of the game with instinctiveness in their play and also led their team with ambition and grace, Dhoni deserves a great deal of credit and respect for that, no other international cricket captain in the world has so much pressure on their shoulders, The Lensman hasn't posted here much of late but I'm sure he's the best here to confirm just how much victory the Indian cricket fandom want and demand. Dhoni is like the CJ Cregg of Indian cricket, when things are going right they get the best attention, they are well-loved and treated like one of the family, they are the most recongisable face of the organisation but when things are going wrong they are the first in line, they are the one who must watch their every step for fear of being the scapegoat and the love and respect they have come to abode can very quickly be taken away.

England's bowling generally wasn't very good, it lacked the tricks of the trade that we saw on Friday. Dernbach particurlarly struggled hauling the ball into the deck as if he was trying to break floorboards, Finn was wide a lot and off the angle, Woakes worked hard and was unlucky on Jadeja who appeared to edge him through to Kieswetter but on a slower wicket he was going to have to work hard to stay under 5.00, Patel and Tredwell were by far the most effective with Patel England's stand-out man of the day again perservering to keep his team in the game with both ball and bat. Like I said earlier, England's enforcer.

Hopefully this is a blip in England's course to redemption in these climates. 1-1 now though and that does set up nicely for the contination of a thoroughly entertaining series.

_____________________________

"It is the Shawshank Redemption! Just with more tunneling through shit and less fucking redemption."

If you can quote the rules, then you can obey them.


(in reply to Goodfella)
Post #: 4463
RE: Farewell Punter, it's been a pleasure mate! - 24/1/2013 11:22:45 PM   
Goodfella


Posts: 17029
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: North Devon
Well I think it was always to be expected and invariably it was predicted that an England team would eventually succumb to a hot and hungry India side this, and you felt from the swirling fogstorm early yesterday morning, that it wasn't to be England's day, and in that not their series. England have played far worse cricket during an ODI series and ended up winning or drawing, Mohali was as tough as they come and could be the venue for Sunday's final match-up, now a dead rubber but also a reverred opportunity for Ashley Giles and his fresh-faced 50-over England side, but with a better idea of the conditions and pitch to expect now I think England could get more of a stranglehold on the game than they did yesterday and end a highly enjoyable and hard-fought series 3-2. Yesterday's match was a toss to definitely win, the overcast conditions with two new balls and the good pitch, it was a fair battle between bat and ball but India enjoyed the added bonus of being able to see the pace of the wicket and the outfield and also generally how to bat through their innings, England seemed to stop and start and never really got the fluency of their game going, the outfield was fast but the wicket perilously slow which suited a seamer like Bhushwkar Kumar who I'm growing to become a real fan of. He is as close to Zaheer Khan as India have come, probably since 2006, his accuracy and strike rate mixed with his unique ability to swing the ball both ways, his line was near perfect yesterday with each over and whilst he didn't take any wickets in that particurlar match he showed he has the character and mindset to play at the higher level of test cricket as well and they may just have finally found someone, who if he is coached and treated right and not sucked in entirely by the glitz and glamour of the IPL, who could afford a serious opening role alongside Ishant Sharma, who is improving once again after the early stages of his career almost went into freefall after the test series here in England. Here was a tall, pacey, slingy seam bowler who took 27 wickets in test series against Australia and South Africa previously and then came to England, favoured in our conditions, and lulloped to just 5 wickets during the series at almost 43 apeice. Yesterday we saw the kind of bowler Sharma was growing to be prior to the tour to England, his height rewarding his ability to mix up his lengths and sling the ball in and away from the batsman, India don't crave out and out fast bowlers who can swing the ball both ways like Pakistan did during the Wasim Akram era, they prefer the kind of bowlers who can take a bit of pace off their delveries (Praveen Kumar is out injured at the moment and has endured an unfortunate lengthy absence, but he was a very promising talent and when he returns to full fitness, hopefully he still will be) and England perservered so well with out any devestating pace (Broad remains England's fastest bowler and didn't feature during the 2-1 series win in India), South Africa have relied perhaps more on Vernon Philander's ability to swing the ball off a sixpence than perhaps Steyn's defying pace and Morkel's bounce to top the world (Philander took 63 wickets at 13.96 over the course of their 10 most recent tests in 2012) and the Australian team who so dominated the nineties had the likes of Glenn McGrath and Jason Gillespie seaming the ball through the wicket as much as their sheer pace, I won't go back to the multitude of West Indian fast bowlers as uncovered pitches cloud the issue at hand, but my point being that there is feeling this India team is starting to really grow with both bat and ball and going back to their roots, they're starting to find replacements for long-standing stalwarts like VVS Laxman (Suresh Raina), Rahul Dravid (Rohit Sharma), Sachin Tendulkar (Virat Kohli) and perhaps Khan (B. Kumar). Time will tell but India are garnering the feel of an exciting team once again and I always thoroughly enjoy our contests with them, win or lose, they are a country that relises their cricket beyond the point of any obssession relative to us, there's no question of an underlay of political interference and corruption within the Indian game, but there are many good people who support, administer and run it and with Duncan Fletcher's presence now in the dressing room I get the feeling this Indian team will take on a more grounded yet still fantastical approach to the game, they are entertainers, celebrities and cricketers all wrapped into one, roles I feel the likes of MS Dhoni and VVS Laxman have always kept well diversified and guarded, and long may it continue as international cricket on the whole is just not quite as good without a very good, successful and exciting Indian cricket team in all formats. Lord's may be the home, but it's hard to deny that India is the heartbeat of the game.

Moved off topic a little bit I know but congratulations to India. Like I said England haven't played badly this series and we always knew there was plenty of room for improvement in the ODI game, even if we did hold the top ranking prior to this series, our last position at the top of any rankings might I add. There have been plenty of positives to take from this series though - Joe Root is one. He's exceeded everyone's expectations, especially mine, across all formats of the international game, especially given the modern era for the young cricketer and the fact this is about as hard and brutal tour you can ever experience as an international debutant. He has played grounded and defiant innings when required like yesterday with his run-a-ball-plus knock of 57 from 45 after the quick and cheap dismissals of Morgan and Patel. He has also shown he can play with power and flourish, many touted his skillset to that of Pietersen and Morgan's and there not far away at all, perhaps the most exciting factor though for the traditional cricket fan is his ability and mindset to drop back into his crease but without closing up, he's played innings that suit situational cricket in both the tests and ODIs now, and that in itself is a remarkable achievement for such a younger player, I didn't expect, I knew his talent was evident from watching him make a swift but built 50 at Taunton and smash 56 from 23 balls and take his part in a stunning catch at Headingley under the pressure of a T20 quarter-final, but I didn't expect this rate of performance so quickly. It's important not to reach for the starter gun on the next part of his career (I disagree with Michael Vaughan that he should open the batting in the test in NZ, and that's not just because of Nick Compton) but maybe England have uncovered real competition for Johnny Bairstow and James Taylor when they return, with Pietersen back as well it's going to apply real pressure to the likes of Trott, Bell and Bresnan now in the test squad, especially Bresnan when we get back here next summer and don't feel the need neccessarily for an extra bowler.

England's bowling did labour against a strong and searching Indian attack yesterday. It's been a bit of mismatch if truth be told in the situational aspects of the game, I disagree with Botham about Dernbach though, he's right he has areas to work on but he's the most potent strike bowler in the world and for the regrettable aspect of having the highest economy rate in the international game, Botham forget to mention that he also takes most wickets in the final overs of the game in international 50-over cricket since Lasith Malinga retired from the format. Also for the sake of comaprison, Malinga used to leak runs on occasion too but his varities won Sri Lanka more 50-over games than either Sangakkara or Murali ever did, look at the cricinfo stats, he was the deciding factor, and Dernbach for England can be too, especially in the WC when the pressure cooker is really turned up, Dernbach doesn't neccessarily handle his emotions well across the enterity of a game but look at his focus and strategy in his final two overs, it's second to none, look back at the Australia series for example. So it is there. I really am fed up of hearing Botham's latest set of "write-offs". These are young English (okay well English by passport but sod that debate, Botham played with Greig and he bloody loves Pietersen so STFU) cricketers trying their hardest to hone and establish their games in a tough, unforgiving environment. You cannot say Craig Kieswetter has "had his day" when he's not even turned 26 yet and has the highest strike rate of any English-qualified batsman in the domestic one-day game. How long before he says this about Jos Buttler if he drops a catch and doesn't make more than 10 in two of his ODI outings in New Zealand? How long will he give Bairstow, or Prior if he's given a chance to redeem himself in the one-day international arena? The biggest confidence knocker is being dropped out and then cast out like the ECB's selection committees have with so many promising young cricketers over the recent years, especially the 1990s when England were arguably at their worst in international cricket (do I really need to type out the list that starts with two of the domestic game's all-time highest run-scorers, Mark Ramprakash and Graeme Hick) . The ECB are trying to arrest their approach and the EPP was the first step in that direction, I really don't want to hear Beefy's whiny, cynical voice wishwashing every youngster's chance out there because he thinks it's one more than he should have due to one poor performance equalling out of form in his book. Oh my if we'd done that with both Alastair Cook and Kevin Pietersen over the past four years, Cook would be permenantly farming to his sheep and Pietersen would most likely have just finished up at the Big Bash and be preparing for three and a half months off. Hang on, half of that doesn't sound too bad for me actually...

And that, finally, brings me to me to Mr Brylcreem and Adidas. Yep, the ODI and T20 squads were annouced for the New Zealand tour today, starting on the 4 February and for those of you who missed the news Pietersen has been ommitted by the ECB for that part of the tour. So, yes, Pietersen, at last, appears to have got what he wanted. For those of you out there who think this makes him right all along, couldn't be more wrong. The ECB were always going to cave to a degree. Were they seriously going to consider the months of the media storm that would follow, the endless questions that started with "but what if we had KP....", the potential legal battles, the undoubted public and social media criticism that would follow, the pressure on the current coaches and team and the dressing room unrest that would eventually follow with either outcome and, of course, the most marketable product in the current set-up of English cricket. Many should remember it's not just Dehli Daredevils tickets and shirts Pietersen sells....I have exhausted the arguments for why I am against Pietersen over his actions, there's nothing left to say that I haven't said before and I'll never shy away from answering a question about it. He worries me, concerns me, his ego, his attitude, his nature, his whole career intertwined with confrontation and deception (from his early days with Natal and South Africa, read his first autobiography 'Crossing The Bounday' if you can) and this latest set of drama and riddles just further exerts the issue that this is a one-man show, even his post-retirement youtube video was better suited to a drama audition, whenever Pietersen uses the word "team" I cringe, it's like an episode of The X Factor of Big Brother, I'm just not convinced by any of it, and never will be. Yes, we'll move on, we always usually do, last time we didn't it unfairly cost a very good head coach and director of cricket his job and cost Pietersen a position I'm not ever really convinced was nothing more than a further moneymaking machine to him, than a position of honour. Pietersen's most recent comments to date about his relationship with cricket on the whole was this - "I'm like Marmite. Except I don't care anymore whether people love or hate me." What Pietersen must realise is pretty soon he will put England in this undeniable position as well and they will be forced to close the door forever, maybe he will strike a lucky chord and make it to self-voluntary international retirement. I doubt it, as I said on day one from this saga, if we allow him back so easily it will happen again. Pietersen is full of his own self-worth and people like that, especially in the spotlight, can never get enough. England have some rocky roads ahead of them, both on and off the field, cricket is in for a turbulent period of transition and I'd like to think Pietersen will tie up his boots, concentrate on his game and take his big paycheques in earnest. But at the age of 19 he felt out with the most influential and well-loved man in post-Apartheid South African cricket, now almost 15 years later he's still doing it so does anyone seriously expect that much of a change?

It'll be interesting, to say the least, to see where England and Pietersen go with the NZ test series on these shores, the first of which clashes with the final two weeks of the IPL. Pietersen says the IPL is the best tournament in world cricket, no question. That comment, as huge county cricket fan, is enough to make me want to asphixate the egomaniac but perhaps for the fact he couldn't be further from the truth if you are a real cricket fan, the IPL serves it's purpose, but it is a lavishly disgusting roadshow of festivals that makes a mockery of Indian culture in an attempt to attribute to what is perceived as Western cultures that look better suited to a Monopoly board. I'm not saying I hate it, or I wish it didn't exist, or anything like that. I accept it's relevance in the modern world of sport but let's not be kidding ourselves into thinkings this play for your pay format is even worth the equivilant of an American "world series". It's about a mismatch as the first 50-odd balls of England's innings yesterday morning. Pietersen was also incorrect when he said that the best test players in the world get the best IPL contracts and that's why all us test faithfuls should embrace the IPL with as much ferver. Alastair Cook doesn't have an IPL contract, neither does Jimmy Anderson or Jonathan Trott. Hashim Amla is one of the lowest-paid batsmen in the IPL for a current international player, Daniel Vettori is quite far down the list and so is Michael Clarke. Jacques Kallis and Virat Kohli perhaps are the only defining examples. Also Pietersen said the ECB are the only national board to not embrace the scheduling of the IPL whereas every other country has, he is quite right yet I'd ask Pietersen when Australia, South Africa, New Zealand, India and Sri Lanka play the main segment of their cricket calendar? Last time I checked it wasn't in April or May. Sure we could say the same thing if the tournament was hosted in November or December.

_____________________________

"It is the Shawshank Redemption! Just with more tunneling through shit and less fucking redemption."

If you can quote the rules, then you can obey them.


(in reply to Goodfella)
Post #: 4464
RE: Farewell Punter, it's been a pleasure mate! - 27/1/2013 7:49:39 PM   
Goodfella


Posts: 17029
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: North Devon
Well England bow out of the ODI series and the tour of India positively after what has been their most destructive one-day win probably since we faced off against Australia in the summer. The selection of Tim Bresnan is one I found very odd though, he misses the New Zealand tour because of a "recurring elbow injury." Now if he's not fit, he's not healthy, then, in my opinion, you don't play him. You almost certainly don't play him in a dead rubber match-up either, nor when you've had Stuart Meaker lugging around your bags and water coolers for the better part of six weeks. Now I know England are looking to move on from the 1990s and integrate younger players in the senior set-up from an early position and that approach is very positive and has worked well with the likes of Steven Finn but there was an opportunity today and England missed it. I know they probably looked at the track and thought flat, pacey with lots of grip and that's why they went with Bresnan and Tredwell but Meaker is probably one of the fastest bowlers we're going to see come out of county cricket over the next few years, there are obvious differences in bowling variationa and technique, but essentially there are many similarities, basically you're getting more of the same than just seam with Bresnan and Meaker. Now everyone knows what a big fan of Bresnan I am so the sad thing today was just prior to the New Zealand tour (the rest of his team-mates today will be boarding a plane further south of the Indian ocean to Whangaeri in the next few days whilst Bresnan will be hopping onto one with a destination of Heathrow) he bowled some of his best cricket for awhile this year (he has been hampered by injuries so I don't doubt the significance of the problem and I'd rather have a fit for Bresnan for the rest of what will prove to be a long, tough and challenging 2013) today. His figures of 9.4-1-45-5 were, next to Tredwell's in the first match, England's best of the series so far. He generated the pace, seam movement, nip and bounce to be a real problem for India, he hits the bad hard and even his half-volleys can be difficult to pick as a batsman, sometimes his bad ball can get a batsman pushing out and caught at backward point, just how many times have you seen c Bell b Bresnan in an ODI innings. Off the top of my head it's a frequent.

Have to say what a beautiful ground Dharmasala is as well. First ODI staged there today and I'm thoroughly glad it went ahead, what a ground, what beautiful scenery, what a location to play cricket in! That rips the heart out of the fire and hostility of Mumbai or the presence and spectacle of Eden Gardens if you ask me, that's what cricket is all about, England have the added bonus, I believe, of being the first side in over 35 years to beat an India team at a debutant international ground and that's something, with the English record in the sub-continent what it is, to cling onto over the next few years that's for sure. England made light work of it in earnest, good to see Chris Woakes get a go although he has now made four appearances over the last 26 ODIs (you cannot keep treating young players like this and expecting them to just show up one day, take four wickets and then deliver in that exact process for the next 10 matches), I'm not sure about Woakes as an ODI player just yet, he's probably in there because of his overrall skillset as a batsman, bowler and fielder but I am delighted to see him included in the test squad. He has had two absolutely brilliant seasons in a row now and is a county champion with Warwickshire. He's an exceptional line and length bowler, much like Graham Onions is who also makes the test squad for NZ. He can get movement off the ball though and has a fantastic economy rate, he stifles batsman, he has a long-run up and a bouncer that can be quite difficult to read (he got Compton out at the beginning of the summer down here last year in which he sent in two shorter deliveries down the offstump and channel and Compton stood up expecting the fuller one and it jumped up on him, off the top of his bat handle and to Troughton in the slips), his batting has really sparkled in the longer format of the game though, an average of 47 for the last two seasons running and that's coming in at seven or eight, he builds very sensible partnerships, rotating the strike and going through the gears to go after the bowling, I fancy, if he plays, he may have a bit more success with the bat than the ball in New Zealand. Monty keeps his place as well as back-up to the returning Swann although England have a remerging face in Tredwell, he has shown once again this year that he is ecnomical and can really get the spin off his deliveries, he pitches it right up there and unlike a lot of county spinners in this country who rely heavily on the pace to deceive the flight, Tredwell doesn't, he favours the slower pitches and the darting spin and turn it can generate. I'm pleased for Panesar though, he deserves another run in the England test team and I'm not sure about Danny Briggs (who is out injured anyway) as for me in New Zealand a spinner who sees so much in the pace of his deliveries is going to struggle, Briggs is going to be a bowler favoured more in England than abroad if you ask me, Azeem Rafiq is the next one to be looking at depending on how he fares for Yorkshire in D1 next summer.

Ian Bell played wonderfully for his winning 113 today, love how he takes the criticism on his shoulders (you don't see him mouthing off in the press or on Twitter), goes back to what he knows and works hard to get an innings, he's done it once again today. A proper Bell innings. Pushes, prods, cuts, slogs, cover drives, the occasional charge and hit over the top. He uses the orthodox approach, he reads the timing of the ball, he is still England's best player of spin in my view, say what you want about the UAE, he got the three best balls bowled in that series, most others misread length and pitch, he gets over the ball, he doesn't use the premeditated sweep and he gives himself the opportunity to get back in his crease without playing with a lofted bat. Cook is very good in the test game but not so good in the ODIs against spin and Pietersen and Morgan use their locker of shots and their speed to get out of trouble but when they are undone, they are undone so evidently. Playing spin in the subcontinent can be easier than the myths suggest and it is a question of getting back to basics which you saw England do this past winter. Be smart, be patient, be confident, over here it's easier to attack spinners because of the pace of the bowling the pitches bring, in the sub-continent it is not quite like that and you have to build an innings and sometimes be prepared to stabilise and know when to strike, look at the strike rates through the overs per innings of batsman like Gautum Gambhir, Sachin Tendulkar and Rahul Dravid and the way they play, not to mention someone like former England batsman Mark Butcher who played spin so awfully at home, but so marvellously in the subcontinent, or a Graham Thorpe, arguably one of England's greatest players of spin of all time. England will be expected to build on what they have achieved in India over this winter, not just in the coming months but in the future when they return to the sub-continent and perhaps, even, when they play abroad when arguably England player a distinctly poorer brand of cricket than when they are at home, or at least they did prior to the winter of 2009. I insist that is why Andy Flower and Andrew Strauss are two of the greatest, if not the greatest, coach and captain of England of all time. They have instilled a confidence, a self-belief, a team unity, they have worked hard together, independently and within the team to study the finer arts of the game, they have watched, respected, appreciated and sought advice from the team, the training camp in Germany prior to the Ashes in 2010-11 wasn't some media gimmick, for a start none of us even knew it had taken place until the following summer when Tim Bresnan let it slip in a magazine interview. Cook I believe may have some issues onfield as a cricketing captain over his career but he has more than overcome his share of adversity, as a mature, intelligent team leader I think he will take the passing of the torch convincingly, being a captain, although it is early days, seems to have had no bearing on the amount of runs he makes either. He's improved his average as an ODI opening batsman since taking the captaincy, he's knocking on the door or T20 once again and he's just scored two centuries in the most difficult part of the world on his captaincy debut. I should imagine that's a record that most of the greats wouldn't even shake a stick at.

There is also an England Lions squad heading for Australia in the latter part of this winter, it will have it's captaincy duties resumed by James Taylor who presumably, like Woakes and Kieswetter, has had being on the perhiphrals of the England team snatched away from him once again. He actually did very well last summer given the state of the affairs and I would like to see him given another test chance soon, especially given what Joe Root has achieved in a short space of time. It's strange how they've progressed Root's, well, route. Test cricket first, ODI cricket next yet no T20? He was one of the best batsman in T20 last year and his short and sharp offspin could come in real handy, that's another odd one if you ask me but you never can tell with these England selectors and not much has changed there in the past 25 years. It does strike me that the Lions squad, as well, is mainly a sprinkle of players with who's counties achieved most last season, not that that doesn't often benefit from those players themselves, but Rafiq should be there for one, and so should Moeen Ali, and it's not beyond the likes of Adam Ball and so should both the Overtons, although I'm delighted for Craig, it really says something of an 18 year-old who made his debut mid-season to make a Lions squad just the following year. Back in April he was playing for Instow CC in the club cricket leagues, he'll be playing against an Australia XI most likely captained by Cameron White this coming month and that really says something about the talent and potential seen in the young man.

The New Zealand tour comprimises of 3 T20s, 3 ODIs and 3 test matches. New Zealand stunned South Africa in their recent ODI series but their squad struggles have been defined over the past year, both on and off the field, and they won't have been boosted by the news today that star, big-hitting batsman Jesse Ryder will again miss out due to "personal problems relating to alcohol." I really hope it isn't the last we've seen of Ryder, with no Ross Taylor and numerous other injuries, captain Brendon McCullum could really do with Ryder's 360 approach and his versatility to all bowling and conditions, not to mention his experience, which this current New Zealand team really lacks.

_____________________________

"It is the Shawshank Redemption! Just with more tunneling through shit and less fucking redemption."

If you can quote the rules, then you can obey them.


(in reply to Goodfella)
Post #: 4465
RE: Farewell Punter, it's been a pleasure mate! - 1/2/2013 12:34:35 AM   
Goodfella


Posts: 17029
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: North Devon
It has, on many occasions, slipped my mind to mention this lot on here but with the impending New Zealand tour coming up and back-to-back Ashes later this year I thought it was appropriate to give a shout-out to a bunch of fun-loving, cricket-mad guys who, if you are frustrated with major media outlets dominanting all and sundry and not always doing a great job of it, you should give a listen too...

www.testmatchsofa.com

It is audio commentary intertwined with social media and it is made, produced and for, basically, cricket lovers. It has become something of a sensation since it's birth in 2009 and was recently bought by Wisden, which should give you some idea of how highly rated and valued it is.

Jonathan Agnew attacked it a few months back describing it as a "predator" and saying "it should be stricken from the airwaves." This reaction didn't go down especially well, more so considering some took it to mean Aggers was suggesting the everday cricket lover wasn't really entitled to their point of view, certainly wasn't allowed to air it in a public vaccum that went directly to other cricket fans and that we should all just take the words of himself and his [TMS team as fact. Now I love TMS, but they didn't do themselves any favours with their hostility there and I enjoy listening to both shows, it hasn't put me off either.

But come the first match in New Zealand, it may be worth giving TMS Mk II a go if you fancy it!

_____________________________

"It is the Shawshank Redemption! Just with more tunneling through shit and less fucking redemption."

If you can quote the rules, then you can obey them.


(in reply to Goodfella)
Post #: 4466
RE: Farewell Punter, it's been a pleasure mate! - 5/2/2013 11:50:28 AM   
Goodfella


Posts: 17029
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: North Devon
Well done to the England women's cricket team who, this morning, advanced to the Super Sixes stage of the ICC Women's World Cup in India, with a dominating six-wicket win over the West Indies, with 15 overs to spare. After England suffered blushes in their opening group game against Sri Lanka but rallied to beat India and this morning the most successful and decorated team in the history of women's international cricket displayed their firepower in the prize tournament by executing a flawless win over the Windies in which they skittled their opposition for just 101 in 36.4 overs and then followed up by easing their way to 103-4 off 35 overs, leaving 15 to spare.

Seamer Anya Shrubsole marked her 50- tournament debut with 4-21 off 8.4 overs and Katherine Brunt assisted in the damage with 2-10 and opener Danielle Wyatt continuted her impressive career progression with a personal best of 40 from 80 balls including 6 fours. England, defending champions, who have won four of their last five major series in international cricket (losing only the recent T20 to Australia by a crushing four runs) and will soon find out who their first opponents will be in the first knock-out stage of the WC.

The men's team also won their first T20 warm-up match in New Zealand in convincing fashion in Whangaeri. Batting first England, captained by the returning Stuart Broad, made an imposing total of 186-3 off their 20 overs. Michael Lumb (25 off 25), Luke Wright (44 off 32) and Eoin Morgan (48 off 32) set the tone for a stroke-happy England but it was Jos Buttler, batting at five, who stole the show with 57 off just 24 balls, his highest T20 knock for England, which included 6 fours and 3 sixes. Buttler was at his electric best and will eyeing this tour as an opportunity to get a consistent run in the England team and make his mark as a match-winning wicketkeeper batsman. New Zealand, in response, were bowled out for 140 off 19.5 overs with the returning Broad wrapping the match up by taking a hatrick of the final three wickets to collect figures of 4-1-22-3 and Chris Woakes also took 4-27-3 and Jade Dernbach also had 3.5-24-3 as England completed the win in bruising fashion.

Dale Steyn also recorded a career-best of 11-60 as South Africa beat Pakistan in the first test at Johannesburg. Pakistan suffered at the hands of their fast and furious hosts as they were bowled out for 49 and 268, Steyn was at his devastating best and South Africa contiued to assure themselves as the best test team in the world.


_____________________________

"It is the Shawshank Redemption! Just with more tunneling through shit and less fucking redemption."

If you can quote the rules, then you can obey them.


(in reply to Goodfella)
Post #: 4467
RE: Farewell Punter, it's been a pleasure mate! - 11/2/2013 12:10:33 PM   
Goodfella


Posts: 17029
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: North Devon
And to think I thought the Taunton boundary was small.

I'm pretty certain, during yesterday's first T20 at Auckland, that Steven Finn ended up going over the boundary rope several times on the follow-through, when Michael Lumb and Jos Buttler hit their sixes they didn't even need to complete their action, keep their bat straight and hit through the pace of the ball and it ended up in the second tier. Yes, as snobby as this sounds, it's fun for the intellectually-devoid cricket fan who just want to see beer snakes knocked over by flying white cricket balls but to be honest by the end of England's innings I was questioning what cricket I was actually watching. Flat, lifeless track and a boundary that made putting in a third man near impossible unless it's Andrew Flintoff and he fancied queuing for a burger and beer whilst fielding. All you had to do as the batsman was pick the length of the ball and England did it immaculately and you could pretty much pick your placement, it was a living nightmare for the bowlers especially New Zealand's young and inexperienced trio of left-arm seamers, their routing was only slightly marshaled by the experience of James Franklin who calmed things down a bit with a nice line and some fierce bounce but pretty much nothing flew into McCullum's gloves behind the stumps, it was a perfectly-set track for batsmen and they absolutely exploited it.

England recorded their best score in T20, toppled their T20 score abroad and gave the hosting ground a couple of new records as well. Luke Wright has been a globetrotting T20 world superstar of late with memorable knocks in domestic competitions in both South Africa and Australia, as well as a brief stint in the IPL, and he clocked the most attention racing to 27 off 11 balls and then going to 42 off just 20 balls. He drove, cut, flicked and sweeped everything in his path and eventually got out in the same vein virtually every other batsman did, another point about the disappointing pitch, by just not getting enough flight on the ball. There is absolutely no way in a cricket match, T20 or not, that the ball should still be flying at chest-height as it reaches deep mid-wicket off a slog. As a batsman you had to buy and out on Saturday from boredom with the lack of competition I should imagine, some marvellous catches from McCullum and Morgan were the only two wickets where I felt the bowler wasn't just relying on the batsman having a mad heave and not quite getting it. Hira got a little movement back in with his legspin with his first few deliveries and that was about the most worthwhile talking point about the bowling we got in the entire match.

New Zealand didn't have the experience or firepower in their batting to really compete and when Morgan backpeddled, kept his composure and looked up into the direct sun to take a wonderful catch to dismiss the incredibly dangerous McCullum for just 10 you felt it was already over for the hosts. They only added to England's ease with the bat by dropping four simple catches themselves including an exceptional one at short backward leg where somehow, and if my mind serves me right it was Franklin, he managed to grasp and clutch thin air as the ball sailed over his fingertips, it was like watching my two year-old niece try and catch a tennis ball, except she's very young and small, sweet and tries ever so hard. Franklin is an experienced international cricketer and athlete, I admire McCullum for laughing off most of yesterday but you could tell behind the jovial features there was an expression of "I just want to go home now." He looked entirely bemused with the boundary and wicket and even looked sarcastically a few times at his close fielder cordon when Buttler or Bairstow stroked another six whilst playing FIFA on their X-Box.

And they tell me Twenty20 is the format of the game that requires the most talent and technique. See ball, hit ball. I thought cricket was a lot harder than that....

_____________________________

"It is the Shawshank Redemption! Just with more tunneling through shit and less fucking redemption."

If you can quote the rules, then you can obey them.


(in reply to Goodfella)
Post #: 4468
RE: Farewell Punter, it's been a pleasure mate! - 12/2/2013 10:36:23 AM   
impqueen


Posts: 7474
Joined: 24/7/2006
So got to watch my first piece of Cricket since the New Year and England promptly get their ass handed to them.

_____________________________

Yes, always.


(in reply to Goodfella)
Post #: 4469
RE: Farewell Punter, it's been a pleasure mate! - 12/2/2013 5:26:54 PM   
Goodfella


Posts: 17029
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: North Devon
quote:

ORIGINAL: impqueen

So got to watch my first piece of Cricket since the New Year and England promptly get their ass handed to them.


Well Lord knows why they bowled first impy. If there was a little something in the track that gave Stuart Broad a nod that he should have a bowl on it first (and with Tredwell opening then I assume he had to have some kind of plan) then we certainly didn't exploit it, the bowling was, shall we say, indifferent at best. Finn's knee problem continues to elude me, and apparently David Saker, who has spent so much time with Finn in the nets that his wife must be starting to get worried. Something is going to have to give though, Finn has lengthened his run-up since his international debut in 2009 and his persistence to push the ball through and his landing that follows has his knee pointing inwards, the more I watch as my focus is dragged to it due to the attention on the issue, the more unnatural it's starting to look. Like I've said many times before though, Finn still has areas in his game to work on and like the Broad of '09 and '10, he maybe needs to go away and look at his role within the bowling unit and work on his economy and strike-rate before going after his role as the fierce, aggressive enforcing fast bowler who can knock batsmen off their feet, something Broad was starting to develop before he restructured that element and focused more on bowling stump to stump and into the channel, perfecting his line and length that made him such a successful bowler against India in the 4-0 whitewash here in the summer of 2011. I'm not saying Finn is like Broad though, I want Finn to keep his pace and his carry and his shorter ball because that is the kind of bowler he needs to become, he'll be the closest that England have got to our Glenn McGrath and that is something to certainly be excited about for the future but he is not there yet and if he keeps knocking over the stumps it's not going to make a blind bit of difference. Umpires, match referees and test officials have met on this tour and said he will be given one chance this tour to knock over the stumps (which he has done already) and then after that he will be given dead ball. And we all know how that ended up at the Oval last summer when Alverio Peterson edged into the slips when on just 29....

Simple fact is, that in the modern game, it is a big problem that has to be sorted. I'd certainly have Finn playing county cricket when they're back here prior to this coming summer, and I'd have Saker and I'd have Richard Scott on board as well for continuity and I'd start that process now.

I felt England couldn't get their length right on that wicket today, especially Broad and Finn, Broad's final over reminded me of that historical one in India, he tossed everything in there full and in the offstump channel, something that hadn't been working for England all innings. Wright and Dernbach were far more effective and it showed by their ability to mix up the variables a bit more in the shorter format and Dernbach really pinned his slower ball and Wright got a few to move back in albeit not very late and with the size of that boundary I'd have a shot at heaving a slog for six into the legside, it was an incredibly short boundary and the ball just came onto the bat if you didn't change things up, which isn't a lot different to how things worked out the other day in Auckland, which is why I say again, why on earth did England bat first in baking sunlight on a track that really fitted Pancake Day? As for England being confident chasing down a big total, I am never completely confident about England chasing scores and that comes from the history of being an England cricket supporter, whether we're playing Australia on the 5th day of the 4th Ashes Test or we're facing a Bangladesh XI on tour. And England invariably never fail to disappoint with a seemingly incomphrensible batting collapse and at 47-5 we had it, the left-arm seamers fancied the slower surface and and I felt the failure was beautifully summed up by the usually reliable Eoin Morgan labouring to 13 off 22 balls including being dropped and then having the comical asset of two brothers failing to wrap up a simple stumping chance, before eventually the fiery little Irishman cracked it up there for someone, anyone, to catch in the deep.

Jos Buttler was, again, highly enjoyable to watch and the one shining light of a hugely disappointing day for England after the precedent had been set on Saturday. No question these environments suits Buttler given his home surface but I know he has the talent, quality and shot selection to continue this beyond just these short boundaries. He has the contained power to hook and hoist as he did today, he's a terrific timer and a 360 degree player in the vein of an AB De Villiers. This tour might just be the true start of his career as a one-day England player.


< Message edited by Goodfella -- 13/2/2013 5:10:18 PM >


_____________________________

"It is the Shawshank Redemption! Just with more tunneling through shit and less fucking redemption."

If you can quote the rules, then you can obey them.


(in reply to impqueen)
Post #: 4470
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