Register  |   Log In  |  
Sign up to our weekly newsletter    
Follow us on   
Search   
Forum Home Register for Free! Log In Moderator Tickets FAQ Users Online

Ulysses and other works by James Joyce.

 
Logged in as: Guest
  Printable Version
All Forums >> [On Another Note...] >> Bookworms >> Ulysses and other works by James Joyce. Page: [1]
Login
Message << Older Topic   Newer Topic >>
Ulysses and other works by James Joyce. - 22/4/2008 5:41:53 PM   
Manchurian candidate


Posts: 11123
Joined: 13/6/2006
From: A Clear-Thinking Oasis
I'm astonished by the number of people, and I hope that's all, who haven't read anything by James Joyce. This is paraphrased from something I posted earlier but-

Ulysses is a work of unparalled genius. It's exceptionally witty, it's prose and shifting narrative perfectly judged. It's complex, and self-reflexive. It sounds like a cliché, but it's a book in which the reader's perspective does change each time they read it, and you really do notice things, subtle things, on a re-reading which would be nearly impossible to do so on a first reading. In fact, I'm currently mulling over the significance of Bloom's brief musing on the nature of parallax, and the significance of the concept of parallax on the structure of the novel. Which sounds silly on my part, but it's part of the novel's self-reflexive nature. I'm not making sense most probably as my feelings here are difficult to explain but whatever, just read it.

Like earlier, to quote Stephen Fry:

quote:

Lord help us all. "Pretentious drivel", "better off with a good walk rather than reading dusty books". What possible hope is there for a country which with such self-righteous philistinism scorns its own treasures? Ulysses is the greatest novel of the twentieth century. It is is wise, warm, witty, affirmative and beautiful. it is less pretentious than a baked bean. Read it. read it out loud to yourself. It won't bite. It wasn't written either to shock or to impress. Only pretentious barbarians believe artists set out shock: and how these philistines delight in revealing how unshocked they are. Those who attack it are afraid of it and rather than look foolish they prefer to heckle what they don't understand. Ignore all this childish, fear-filled criticism, Ulysses will be read when everything you see and touch around you has crumbled into dust.


Time for another cliché. The impact of Joyce, specifically Ulysses, has had on the history of English literature is immense, Shakespeare has had a larger impact, maybe Milton, but that's it, as far as I know.

As I said in Homer's thread, "The Modern Library picked it as the best book written for a reason. (http://www.randomhouse.com/modernlibrary/100bestnovels.html) (It came eleventh on the list voted for by readers, although the vote was rigged by Scientologists, (Battlefield Earth came third!)). But the list shows that critically, it's unrivaled, and it has broad appeal to the public, hence it's strong showing here.

A common criticism of Ulysses is that it's hard to understand. It's not. It's not even approaching difficult. (You'd have a point with Finnegans Wake though). If you do struggle though, use Wikipedia or something to help get to grips with the narrative. (I even wrote some of the article, so ignore the questionable grammar. My presence also makes wikipedia 32% more awesome). "

My only regret is that I haven't read it more.

If anyone is unfamiliar with the text, and wonders why it's called Ulysses, it's not because it's got anything to do with Greece, it's because it takes structural influence from The Odyssey, and has vaguely corresponding characters. (Vaguely being the operative word). Such as Leopold Bloom and Odysseus, Molly Bloom and Penelope and also Calypso, and Stephen Dedalus and Telemachus. It's actually set in Dublin on the 16th June 1904.

Also, I swear by the 1922 text. Which is the one used by Oxford World Classics range.

Ulysses is a well known and highly regarded novel, so I assume quite a few will have read it, so I'd be interested in any opinions. I bet Rick_7 has read it, I'm not sure his opinions matter though, because he doesn't like Peter Gabriel.



< Message edited by Manchurian candidate -- 22/4/2008 6:06:15 PM >


_____________________________

"Ford's economics are the worst thing that's happened to this country since pantyhose ruined finger-fucking."
Lyndon B. Johnson
"British Beatitudes! … Beer, beef, business, bibles, bulldogs, battleships, buggery and bishops"
-Ulysses, By James Joyce
"Rose McGowan is a fucking clown"
-Harry Lime
"Who's Keith"
- Rhubarb
Post #: 1
RE: Ulysses and other works by James Joyce. - 23/4/2008 6:21:36 PM   
Olaf


Posts: 23709
Joined: 26/2/2007
From: 41°N 93°W
Go home.






Seriously though, brilliant book. Joyce is one of Ireland's finest writers, and should be recognised as such.


_____________________________

I tried to groan, Help! Help! But the tone that came out was that of polite conversation.

Empire Top 100 Albums Poll 2013: CLICK HERE

(in reply to Manchurian candidate)
Post #: 2
RE: Ulysses and other works by James Joyce. - 23/4/2008 6:27:22 PM   
homersimpson_esq


Posts: 20120
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Springfield
Is it based on this TV series?



If it is, it must be awesome!


_____________________________

That deep-browed Homer ruled as his demesne.


Bristol Bad Film Club
A place where movie fans can come and behold some of the most awful films ever put to celluloid.

(in reply to Olaf)
Post #: 3
RE: Ulysses and other works by James Joyce. - 23/4/2008 6:32:35 PM   
Manchurian candidate


Posts: 11123
Joined: 13/6/2006
From: A Clear-Thinking Oasis

quote:

ORIGINAL: homersimpson_esq

Is it based on this TV series?





No, it isn't. Well, not that I know of.

_____________________________

"Ford's economics are the worst thing that's happened to this country since pantyhose ruined finger-fucking."
Lyndon B. Johnson
"British Beatitudes! … Beer, beef, business, bibles, bulldogs, battleships, buggery and bishops"
-Ulysses, By James Joyce
"Rose McGowan is a fucking clown"
-Harry Lime
"Who's Keith"
- Rhubarb

(in reply to homersimpson_esq)
Post #: 4
RE: Ulysses and other works by James Joyce. - 23/4/2008 6:47:17 PM   
Amelie_Scotland


Posts: 17468
Joined: 13/10/2005
From: Take a guess.
I haven't read the book but it's on the list of books I need to read in English lit for university next year so will have to soon. Is the final chapter really void of all full stops?
(P.S. the reader's choice on that list is bloody awful, scientologists need to read some better boks.)

_____________________________

I'm clean, I'm conscientious and I travel with my own tits.

You may not be able to change the world, but at least you can embarrass the guilty.

(in reply to Manchurian candidate)
Post #: 5
RE: Ulysses and other works by James Joyce. - 23/4/2008 6:56:23 PM   
Manchurian candidate


Posts: 11123
Joined: 13/6/2006
From: A Clear-Thinking Oasis
quote:

ORIGINAL: Amelie_Scotland

I haven't read the book but it's on the list of books I need to read in English lit for university next year so will have to soon. Is the final chapter really void of all full stops?
(P.S. the reader's choice on that list is bloody awful, scientologists need to read some better boks.)


I like the critics list though.

Okay, the last episode isn't devoid of all full stops, it has about three. But I'm fairly sure full stops are the only type of punctuation in the chapter, for example 'I'm', is written as Im and so forth. It's written as in a stream of consciousness, but it's easy to follow. The chapter are divided into eight 'sentences'. Really, the narrative pretty much ends with the seventeenth episode, but eighteen gives us Marion's perspective on events, and a deeper insight into the relationship between her and her husband. It ties in quite closely with what's already been established, and it's beautifully written.

It's going to be a great book to do for English literature, if it seems intimidating a re-read will clear everything up, as condesending as that sounds.

< Message edited by Manchurian candidate -- 23/4/2008 6:58:24 PM >


_____________________________

"Ford's economics are the worst thing that's happened to this country since pantyhose ruined finger-fucking."
Lyndon B. Johnson
"British Beatitudes! … Beer, beef, business, bibles, bulldogs, battleships, buggery and bishops"
-Ulysses, By James Joyce
"Rose McGowan is a fucking clown"
-Harry Lime
"Who's Keith"
- Rhubarb

(in reply to Amelie_Scotland)
Post #: 6
RE: Ulysses and other works by James Joyce. - 29/4/2008 10:18:45 AM   
The2ndRing


Posts: 3960
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: rehab
It is a fantastic book, I found it quite hard to get into but once I was a hundred or so pages in I wizzed through it. 

quote:

I fear those big words, Stephen said, which make us so unhappy.


quote:

  He…saw the dark tangled curls of his bus floating, floating hair of the stream around the limp father of thousands, a languid floating flower.


Brilliant

_____________________________

I've been drunk for about a week now, and I thought it might sober me up to sit in a library

"Do you know what I like about you?
Fuck all."




(in reply to Manchurian candidate)
Post #: 7
RE: Ulysses and other works by James Joyce. - 3/5/2008 12:02:46 AM   
G.O.B


Posts: 2347
Joined: 9/3/2006
From: Ireland
Might buy this at the weekend, so i can read it after my murakami binge

_____________________________

Member of COBW

All I can do is be me, whoever that is. - Bob Dylan

Last Film Watched: Duck Soup (McCarey,1933)****

(in reply to Manchurian candidate)
Post #: 8
RE: Ulysses and other works by James Joyce. - 3/5/2008 1:05:11 PM   
Manchurian candidate


Posts: 11123
Joined: 13/6/2006
From: A Clear-Thinking Oasis
quote:

"British Beatitudes! … Beer, beef, business, bibles, bulldogs, battleships, buggery and bishops"


It's the single greatest use of alliteration ever recorded.

_____________________________

"Ford's economics are the worst thing that's happened to this country since pantyhose ruined finger-fucking."
Lyndon B. Johnson
"British Beatitudes! … Beer, beef, business, bibles, bulldogs, battleships, buggery and bishops"
-Ulysses, By James Joyce
"Rose McGowan is a fucking clown"
-Harry Lime
"Who's Keith"
- Rhubarb

(in reply to G.O.B)
Post #: 9
RE: Ulysses and other works by James Joyce. - 3/5/2008 6:03:39 PM   
moontheloon


Posts: 6321
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Birmingham
I had heard all the controversy about the book before, controversy in the sense of whether it is any good or not, and then when I saw the discussions flaring up on here I decided to go and actually buy a copy for myself. I don't think I will begin reading it for a month or so, but when my exams are over I will give it a go and see what I make of it, And don't worry MC, I got the 1922 text 

_____________________________


A man is a success if he gets up in the morning and gets to bed at night and in between he does what he wants to do

(in reply to Manchurian candidate)
Post #: 10
Page:   [1]
All Forums >> [On Another Note...] >> Bookworms >> Ulysses and other works by James Joyce. Page: [1]
Jump to:





New Messages No New Messages
Hot Topic w/ New Messages Hot Topic w/o New Messages
Locked w/ New Messages Locked w/o New Messages
 Post New Thread
 Reply to Message
 Post New Poll
 Submit Vote
 Delete My Own Post
 Delete My Own Thread
 Rate Posts


 
Movie News  |  Empire Blog  |  Movie Reviews  |  Future Films  |  Features  |  Video Interviews  |  Image Gallery  |  Competitions  |  Forum  |  Magazine  |  Resources
 
Forum Software © ASPPlayground.NET Advanced Edition 2.4.5 ANSI

0.078