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RE: great badir's top 150 films - 13/2/2006 6:37:14 PM   
The Don


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I really need to get a hold of The Long Riders now! By the way, Badlands and Come And See are some quite inspired choices and Bjergkøbing Grand Prix was one of the films I used to just watch over and over again when I was a little kid (yeah, I know, I'm still a little kid... ). Anyway, when's the next one up?

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RE: great badir's top 150 films - 14/2/2006 8:34:00 AM   
great_badir


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From: A breaking rope bridge in the middle of the jungle
111 Django, Sergio Corbucci (1966)
Whilst Leone and Eastwood were cleaning up at the box office with The Good, The Bad & The Ugly, the men who would take their place (at the European box office, at least) - Sergio Corbucci and Franco Nero, respectively - were out dragging around coffins, taking pot shots at slaves and blowing up everything in sight. Django is a world away from Leone's romanticism - instead of sunny deserts, bloodless kills and the occasional gag, Corbucci places the viewer in tons of filth, mud, corpses, blood and all round misery. It has been argued by many a spaghetti-fan that Corbucci had the stylistic edge over Leone, despite not having access to the same production values. I'm not sure I agree with that, but Corbucci was without doubt an under-rated director. Many of his best films (The Big Silence, Companeros and Django itself) have often been thought of by most critics as Leone-light, but, as Django proves, Corbucci was a worthy director in his own right, capable of painting as impressive a canvas as his better known colleague.

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RE: great badir's top 150 films - 14/2/2006 8:34:19 AM   
great_badir


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110 Mallrats, Kevin Smith (1995)
A lot of people would say that this is a fairly shaky choice, with the one Kevin Smith film that most people (even his fans) see as "the crap one". So why do I think it's the best of his career so far? Simple, really - everything about Mallrats, in terms of its place in the Smith universe, is perfect. Whilst Clerks remains rough and ready (and Jay & Bob hadn't yet hit their stride), Chasing Amy I personally hate (sorry - I just don't buy the preachiness and all that let's-sort-this-with-a-threesome bollocks), Dogma is overlong and maybe a little too heavy on the religious theorising, Jay & Bob Strike Back is a little too reference-heavy for it to feel fresh and Jersey Girl, under-rated though it is, is just Smith relaxing and having the easy life with a gentle rom-com. Mallrats, on the other hand, is pretty much the best bits of Smith's entire ouvre rolled into one short ride - after its worrying 90210-esque opening, the gutters open and the low-brow humour ride begins. And it barely pauses for a breather for the rest of the film - stink-palm, La Fours, the Easter Bunny, Stan Lee, Mr Svenning. All good stuff!

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RE: great badir's top 150 films - 14/2/2006 8:34:40 AM   
great_badir


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109 Wong Fei Huing (AKA Once Upon A Time In China), Tsui Hark (1991) 
Tsui Hark's lovingly shot Once Upon A Time In China follows the legendary Chinese folk hero Wong Fei-Hung (Jet Li) as he strives to prevent the shit hitting the fan when dastardly English forces and a bent Chinese militia try to take the city from the people. Okay, so it's got the obligatory melodramatic Hong Kong romance and a Jackie Chan sung theme tune, but it has a level of professionalism about it that very few HK martial arts films had at the time, as well as some jaw dropping acrobatic wire-fu displays from Li, Yuen Biao, Yee Kwan Yan and Yuen Cheung-Yan.  It also LOOKS like practically nothing else from that period (when Hong Kong cinema was at the end of its third golden age) - the luscious cinematography comes from a much more expensive film and makes every scene look like a painting. Should really have done the business that (still excellent) Crouching Tiger did, but you can't have everything.

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RE: great badir's top 150 films - 14/2/2006 8:35:01 AM   
great_badir


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108 Strange Brew, Rick Moranis & Dave Thomas (1983)If you don't crack a smirk at the line "take off, hoser", then you either haven't heard of the Mckenzie Brothers, or you don't find Rick Moranis and Dave Thomas's idiotic Canadian beer lovers funny.  Strange Brew is one of those films with a brilliant pedigree and a built-in fanbase that did no business whatsoever and disappeared almost immediately.  It's a shame, cos this dumb comedy take on Hamlet (yes, Hamlet) is full of genius moments and the always hilarious canadian stereotypes (cf. Canadian Bacon and South Park: Bigger, Longer & Uncut).  It's also immensely influential - without the Mckenzies and Strange Brew, we probably wouldn't have got Wayne & Garth (some would say that's a good thing).  Top props have to go to the always game Max Von Sydow, wisely playing it dead straight as if he were in another Bergman tragedy.  Endlessly quotable too - "Luke, join the dark side you nob", "let's get some beer, eh?", "just because I don't know what it is, it doesn't mean i'm lying!!" and, of course, the aforementioned "take off, hoser".

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RE: great badir's top 150 films - 14/2/2006 8:35:26 AM   
great_badir


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107 Hoop Dreams, Steve James (1994)   Massive true-life documentary following two basketball hopefuls from troubled school life to the verge of big league stardom and back again.  The subjects, Arthur Agee and William Gates, opened their lives to James and his crew for literally years (five, to be exact) allowing everything from their triumphs on the court, to one of their own parents dealing out crack off court, to be filmed without censoring.  It's bold and simultaneously heart warming and breaking stuff - with both men ultimately failing to match their dreams, they nevertheless have a successful life to show off in the shape of close family and helping others with a similar poverty-row background.  At a shave under three hours long, it's epic stuff indeed and there's even a villain-of-the-piece in the shape of sly coach Gene Pingatore, who promises far more than he ever delivers, destroying confidence and enthusiasm with equal abandon (boo, hiss).  One of the finest documentaries ever made.

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RE: great badir's top 150 films - 14/2/2006 10:04:55 AM   
R.J.MacReady


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Somebody get this man a job on TV.

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RE: great badir's top 150 films - 14/2/2006 4:33:49 PM   
DanielFullard


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The best thread going continues to be great.....Badir you have earned my respect

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RE: great badir's top 150 films - 14/2/2006 6:43:46 PM   
Jack's Rage

 

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 Badir you continue to impress.  And you have the guts to be critical of Shindler's List and include Mallrats.  Keep up the great work!

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RE: great badir's top 150 films - 14/2/2006 8:14:18 PM   
asbo92

 

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ahhh evil dead 2 is it just me or does everyone now want a chainsaw for an arm?

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RE: great badir's top 150 films - 15/2/2006 1:24:40 PM   
great_badir


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106 Days Of Heaven, Terrence Malick (1978)A mere (in Malick terms) five years after hitting big with Badlands, Malick showed the first signs of eccentricities that he would later become famous for.  Throwing out his own script after only a couple of months of filming, the director gave free reign to his cast, encouraging them to "find" the story in their owncharacters lives.  Shooting for only a few hours a day (almost the entire film was shot at dusk with only natural light) over the course of a year, Malick took hundreds of hours of film and then locked himself away in the editing suite for a further two years.  Whittling down the piece to a brief 95 minutes, the end result was a bridge between the stark simplicity of Badlands and the highly philosophical nature of his future projects.  It still shares much with hisdebut, though - seen, again, through the eyes of a young girl, Days Of Heaven is another romantic drama, with a bit of added jealousy courtesy of a love triangle thrown into the mix.  But Days takes another route here - whilst the scenery in Badlands acts as not much more than a backdrop (albeit a very beautiful backdrop) to the action, in Days (much like The New World) scenery becomes a character in its own right, where changes in light and surroundings directly reflect the changes in character moods and situations - you could say it's his first man versus nature pic.  Many complain about its languid pace (which was intentional) but, as the tagline suggested, Days Of Heaven is all about what the audience's senses pick up on.  Just a beautiful film to watch.

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RE: great badir's top 150 films - 15/2/2006 1:25:05 PM   
great_badir


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105 Hearts Of Darkness: A Filmmaker's Apocalypse, Fax Bahr & George Hickenlooper (1991) 
The general mood in the Apocalypse Now camp during its 10 odd year journey from initial idea (courtesy of George Lucas) to screen, including 5 plus years of production hell, was exhausted frustration.  Directors Fax Bahr and George Hickenlooper (great names, both) make good use of Eleanor Coppola's stunnging archive footage in Hearts Of Darkness, picking apart what was driving everyone (mad) at the time and mixing it all with (then) present day talking heads with the benefit of hindsight. The archive footage basically shows a director at odds with his cast, crew and surroundings, but one who is so wrapped up in completing his pet project that he doesn't let anything (not even the near death of Martin Sheen and the demands of working with both a fat and pretentious Brando, AND a wired Dennis Hopper.....all at the same time!!!) get in his way.  The latter day interviews show the key players proud and largely relaxed about the whole thing, despite Sheen barely escaping the grim reaper by the skin of his teeth and everyone else being driven clear to the nuthouse.  For years it was also the only way we could see tantalising glimpses of stuff that didn't end up in the finished film (remember, Redux wasn't even a spark in Coppola's brain when this came out) and even some very brief footage of the earliest screen version with Harvey Keitel in the Willard role.  Hearts Of Darkness could well be the best making-of documentary yet made.

Special mention:Poor old Terry Gilliam.  The man hasn't had an easy break since The Fisher King, and the proverbial noose around his neck hasn't loosened an inch in the intervening years.  But he deserves much respect for never giving up, no matter how many times he's knocked down.  His most recent battle with the two-faced Weinsteins did, eventually, result in a film (The Brothers Grimm), but the walking disaster that was his long cherished Don Quixote fantasy proved to be one lofty idea too far.  An ailing star, clashing schedules, previously unheard of weather and less than happy financiers all combined to pip this one at the post.  Well, BEFORE the post, actually.  Arguably, he should have (and probably did) known better - Quixote has been a legendarily difficult story to bring to the screen, with most directors either presenting a mediocre result, or (as in Orson Welles's case) never being able to finish the thing in the first place.  Gilliam's was the most adventurous version yet, adding in a time travel element, and whilst test footage looked awesome, there just wasn't enough time or money for the project to be finished.  Keith Fulton and Louise Pepe's documentary Lost In La Mancha (2002) originally started out as a run-of-the-mill making of, but it soon became clear that they were actually documenting the crumbling of a dream and the near destroying of a career.  Also featuring one of the most heartbreaking moments in filmmaking history, as Gilliam watches an entire painstakingly built set wash away before his eyes in a freak storm.  If I ever win stupid money on the lottery, Gilliam gets a million or two from me.

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RE: great badir's top 150 films - 15/2/2006 1:25:52 PM   
great_badir


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104 Fail-Safe, Sidney Lumet (1964) 
If you've ever wondered what Dr Strangelove would have been like had Kubrick decided to keep it as serious as the source novel, then look no further than Sidney Lumet's almost unheard of '64 thriller Fail-Safe. It really is Strangelove played DEADLY seriously, and it's absolutely terrifying with it. Top notch performances from Henry Fonda, Walter Matthau and even Larry Hagman. Yes, Larry Hagman.  Even though it wears its ultra-low budget on its sleeves, Lumet saves it from mere B-movie curio, stumping up a pretty good "what if?" of 1960s paranoia in cold war America. If you can find it, get it and show it to anyone who thinks that Strangelove is the pinnacle of 60s cold war movie-making.  Recently re-done by George Clooney as a live TV event (haven't seen it, but it's supposed to be great).

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RE: great badir's top 150 films - 15/2/2006 1:26:37 PM   
great_badir


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103 The Aristocrats, Paul Provenza (2005) 
I had the pleasure of seeing this filthy little bastard of a doc at a less than packed screening (there were 12 people in the audience, only 5 made it through to the end) on a stifling summer's day. Paul Provenza and Penn Jillette's examination of the infamous Aristocrats joke is shoddily shot, edited rather poorly and obviously thrust upon several of the guests in between work (Robin Williams on a beach in San Fran, George Carlin in his dressing room, Drew Carey in between filming, Bob Saget literally just before going on stage etc etc), but if you have a taste for challenging, low-brow filth and horrendously offensive humour (think Peter Cook and Dudley Moore in  Derek & Clive mode and times that by 10) then The Aristocrats is one of the funniest films of the last five years. Get past the initial "whoa" factor of the meat of the joke and what you get is a fascinating insight into how comedians form something from nothing. Over the course of an hour and a half (which could actually do with having 10-15 minutes chopped off the second half) we get plenty of riffs on the joke, some of which work, some don't (ironically it's the usually unseen writers that whip out the funniest versions). If you are easily offended then DO NOT (as one couple in the audience I was with did, the nobs) see this on the assumption that a film with that title will be some sort of costume drama. DO NOT see this if you are easily offended. In fact, even if it still takes a lot to offend you, caution should still be exercised. If, however, you relish filthy humour, then you're in for a treat!

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RE: great badir's top 150 films - 15/2/2006 1:59:27 PM   
great_badir


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102 Vamos a Matar Companeros (AKA Companeros), Sergio Corbucci (1970)After years of producing largely gruelling and challenging films that left little in the way of good feelings for the audience, in 1970 Sergio Corbucci decided to throw everything (including the kitchen sink) into a reasonably broad western comedy (as opposed to comedy western), thick with political and social commentary and boasting a drugged up, crow wielding psycho in the shape of Jack Palance.  Companeros is Corbucci's The Good, The Bad & The Ugly - huge in scope, high on set-pieces and a vague morality play at its heart.  Arguably, amazing as it is, Companeros ruined Corbucci's career as (from the good notices the film received) the director drifted into better paid but otherwise mediocre comedy, usually starring Terrence Hill and Bud Spencer.  It's certainly the last great film he ever made and his swift fall from grace (his next film, an Italian comedy costume drama, was and still is a stinker) perhaps goes some way to explaining why he's often ignored in favour of Leone.  But Companeros is long overdue some re-appraisal for the great double act of Franco Nero and Tomas Milian, some wonderfully inventive sequences (Nero and Milian buried up to their necks, horses charging at them is a cracker), amazing cinematography and a brilliant Morricone score.   

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RE: great badir's top 150 films - 15/2/2006 1:59:47 PM   
great_badir


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101 The Terminator, James Cameron (1984)
Still Cameron's best in my opinion, the film that put Arnie on the A-list is a cold, cold little piece of work. These days it's difficult to imagine an Arnie film with no one liners (even the now famous "i'll be back" is humourless and done without fanfare) and a Cameron film with no stagey romantic sub-text or single scene that costs the same as the national debt of a third world country. But The Terminator is both of those. Violence, intelligence, by and large decent SFX (okay, the matte lines are showing a bit these days) and credible characters all contribute to the film's greatness, but let's not forget Brad Fiedel's genius title theme - barely has an original score suited a film so well.

< Message edited by great_badir -- 15/2/2006 2:00:33 PM >


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RE: great badir's top 150 films - 15/2/2006 2:01:00 PM   
great_badir


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100 Alien 3, David Fincher (1992)
Blame Aliens. After James Cameron's over-rated (IN MY OPINION, you flame-war types) "'nam in space" installment, Alien 3 stalled and was met with little or no thumbs poised upwards, thanks to fans expecting something with a lot of guns and explosions. When I first saw the film shortly after its VHS release, Fincher was of course unknown except for the odd bits of effects work he did on Return Of The Jedi. But as soon as I saw it, I fell in love with its back-to-basics approach, and i've been championing it ever since. The extended cut in the Quadrilogy goes some way to show what the film could have been, but even with Sigournery Weaver's sticky producer paws clearly all over it, Fincher's style and substance gleam through as do the performances of the quality ensemble cast. These days, the film is gathering a fairly large and loyal following, but it's only been in recent years as Fincher's star has got a little bigger and people have started to understand where he's coming from. If any film deserved a second chance (not only from its audience, but also its director), then it's this one.

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RE: great badir's top 150 films - 15/2/2006 2:02:18 PM   
great_badir


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99 Mong ming yuen yeung (On The Run), Alfred Cheung (1988)
Yuen Biao was one of the first of the 80s HK martial arts heroes to do a "serious" film. Right in the middle of all the goofy kung-fu comedies and high wire stunt movies, Biao got into this tense and gritty thriller, with nary a martial arts move in sight. It's also bereft of Woo-style gunplay. Instead, it's a talky and bleak exercise in nail biting suspense. It's also one of the earliest of the "Heroic Bloodshed" thrillers to feature more of an emphasis on script and performance than balletic fireworks - Biao here is nothing short of mesmerising. Gone are the acrobatic fighting skills, confidence and pratfalls, instead replaced by isolation, fear and helplessness. Imagine Arnie doing the same (and doing it BRILLIANTLY) and that's how much of a role reversal it is. Unfortunately, On The Run is spoilt by a rather silly final 15 minutes that jars with the rest of the film, but it's nonetheless still a top notch thriller.

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RE: great badir's top 150 films - 15/2/2006 3:04:30 PM   
The Don


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quote:

ORIGINAL: great_badir

Blame Aliens. After James Cameron's over-rated (IN MY OPINION, you flame-war types) "'nam in space" installment, Alien 3 stalled and was met with little or no thumbs poised upwards, thanks to fans expecting something with a lot of guns and explosions.

    

    

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RE: great badir's top 150 films - 15/2/2006 3:12:03 PM   
DanielFullard


Posts: 1025
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Im a bigger fan of T2 than T1 myself and Im guessing by your "Camerons best film" comment we wont be seeing the sequel in your top 100

Just when I loose faith in this forum Badir comes along and gives us such a good thread!

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RE: great badir's top 150 films - 15/2/2006 3:43:07 PM   
The Don


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quote:

ORIGINAL: DanielFullard

Just when I loose faith in this forum Badir comes along and gives us such a good thread!

Aye. You've checked out the Messiah's "Box Office Bombs" thread?

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RE: great badir's top 150 films - 15/2/2006 4:18:49 PM   
great_badir


Posts: 4662
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From: A breaking rope bridge in the middle of the jungle
quote:

ORIGINAL: The Don

Aye. You've checked out the Messiah's "Box Office Bombs" thread?



I'm not the messiah....................................i'm a very naughty boy

Anyway, one more for today -

98 Zero Effect, Jake Kasdan (1998)
Released with absolutely no notice whatsoever, Kasdan Jnr's first film as director is flawed (Daryl Zero is never quite as loony-tunes as his introduction suggests and the romantic sub-plot seems a little forced, if not an afterthought altogether), but a wonderful little film nevertheless. By all rights it should have been Ryan O'Neal's return to the big leagues, excellent and against type as he is here. Also good are the rest of the cast - Ben Stiller in an extremely low key role, and the lovely Kim Dickens as Zero's object of professional and personal interest. What REALLY makes this film great, though, is Bill Pullman as Zero (surviving on endless cans of Tab) and the little Columbo-like detecting scenes that pepper the film which keep you guessing right to the end.

< Message edited by great_badir -- 15/2/2006 4:20:30 PM >


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RE: great badir's top 150 films - 15/2/2006 5:29:46 PM   
The Don


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quote:

ORIGINAL: great_badir

I'm not the messiah....................................i'm a very naughty boy



Aye. Any chance of Life Of Brian popping up somewhere in your list?

Ps. I don't know why the fuck I keep saying "aye"...

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RE: great badir's top 150 films - 15/2/2006 6:13:06 PM   
Dignan


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quote:

ORIGINAL: great_badir


Anyway, one more for today -

98 Zero Effect, Jake Kasdan (1998)
Released with absolutely no notice whatsoever, Kasdan Jnr's first film as director is flawed (Daryl Zero is never quite as loony-tunes as his introduction suggests and the romantic sub-plot seems a little forced, if not an afterthought altogether), but a wonderful little film nevertheless. By all rights it should have been Ryan O'Neal's return to the big leagues, excellent and against type as he is here. Also good are the rest of the cast - Ben Stiller in an extremely low key role, and the lovely Kim Dickens as Zero's object of professional and personal interest. What REALLY makes this film great, though, is Bill Pullman as Zero (surviving on endless cans of Tab) and the little Columbo-like detecting scenes that pepper the film which keep you guessing right to the end.


Good Choice, Zero Effect is awesome and so few people have seen it.

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RE: great badir's top 150 films - 15/2/2006 6:40:25 PM   
Leomuse


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quote:

ORIGINAL: great_badir


100 Alien 3, David Fincher (1992)



Hellz yeah.

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Post #: 85
RE: great badir's top 150 films - 16/2/2006 12:56:33 PM   
great_badir


Posts: 4662
Joined: 6/10/2005
From: A breaking rope bridge in the middle of the jungle
quote:

ORIGINAL: The Don


Aye. Any chance of Life Of Brian popping up somewhere in your list?



Nope.  But Python is in here.

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RE: great badir's top 150 films - 16/2/2006 12:57:50 PM   
great_badir


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From: A breaking rope bridge in the middle of the jungle
=97 The Mission, Roland Joffe (1986)
Despite being a breathtaking film and featuring one of De Niro's best performances, The Mission has almost been forgotten over the years.  Joffe steered his cast and crew through terrible conditions (intense heat, heavy rain storms, mosquitos, poor living conditions) and dysentry to produce an authentic tale of religion versus politics in 18th century South America.  Jeremy Irons and De Niro battle it out for the acting nods (Irons' quiet and dignified magnetism vs. De Niro's enormous character arch), whilst top Brit DoP Chris Menges wins the day with his beautiful cinematography. Swinging from drama to all-out action sequences, it takes the viewer on a real emotional journey. It doesn't pull any punches either - it deals with a tough subject (christian missions in South America - good or bad?) and, like Joffe's earlier The Killing Fields, doesn't give any easy answers.  Criticised (unfairly, in my opinion) for its fictional slant and a one sided portayal of the time and situation, The Mission still feels authentic enough to shake the criticisms off.
=97 The Killing Fields, Roland Joffe (1984)Another cheat.  I REALLY couldn't decide which of The Mission and The Killing was better.  I wanted to include both, but it's a level two horse race all the way.  So, being that they deal with similar issues, i've put them at equal billing.  Uber depressing, but a fine fine film with tragic star Haing S Ngor earning every millimetre of his oscar.  Sam Waterston is also on fine form as the New York Times journalist caught up in Pol Pot's campaign of genocide, with Bruce "Whithnail & I" Robinson's cracking screenplay adding so much more to the political meat of the story.

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RE: great badir's top 150 films - 16/2/2006 12:58:38 PM   
great_badir


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96 Love & Death, Woody Allen (1975)Woody's masterpiece never lets up as we go from stupid joke to high faluting philosophy and back again over the course of a stomach-aching 85 minutes.  Perhaps moreso than Annie Hall, Love & Death was the first bridge between the "earlier, funnier ones" and the "later, not so funny ones" filled, as it is, with Sleeper-like slapstick and Manhattan-esque monologues (even if they do, unlike in Manhattan, normally finish on an intentionally silly punchline).  Best bits are too numerous to mention, but particular highlights include the black Russian army officer ("god-damn, you LOVE the army, dontchoo!!"), James Tolkan as Napoleon and his double beating each other up, Woody's extended family (his proud father hoping to build on a piece of land no bigger than a dinner plate) and the village idiot convention.  Not forgetting brilliant use of Prokofiev's Troika.  Classic stuff.

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Post #: 88
RE: great badir's top 150 films - 16/2/2006 12:59:23 PM   
great_badir


Posts: 4662
Joined: 6/10/2005
From: A breaking rope bridge in the middle of the jungle
95 Airplane, Jim Abrahams & the Zucker brothers (1980)
In terms of jokes-per-minute, Airplane pretty much sits on top of the pile. In the first five minutes alone there are something like twenty plus jokes (visual and otherwise) and, over the course of 88 minutes, the hit rate is phenomenal. Okay, some of it seems dated now, but it's still chock-full of brilliant bits of business (anything with Lloyd Bridges or Robert Stack, the jive passengers, "have you ever been to a Turkish prison, Joey?", the Saturday Night Fever sequence and more) and was among the first rash of post modern comedies (along with Kentucky Fried Movie).

Special mention:

Whilst Ken Finkleman's Airplane 2: The Sequel (1982) is pretty much a less funny remake, it does feature what is perhaps the best scene of the entire Airplane series - the introduction to none other than William Shatner's Buck Murdock:
"Meet me up at the tower."
"Sir, we don't have a tower."
"We don't have a tower? Well, what have we got?"
"We have a bridge."
"Why the hell doesn't anyone tell me these things!!!"

Genius.

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Post #: 89
RE: great badir's top 150 films - 16/2/2006 1:08:13 PM   
great_badir


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From: A breaking rope bridge in the middle of the jungle
94 Se sei vivo spara (Django, Kill...If You Live, Shoot!), Giulio Questi (1967)
Ultra-violent and ultra-nasty non-Django sequel (the Django prefix was only added to help market the film overseas) isn't easy to sit through, even though it's nearly 40 years old - scalpings, a man torn limb from limb for some gold bullets, torture and our "hero" being crucified in a cave full of hungry animals. Whilst most spaghettis of the time were fairly straight forward in style and execution, Django Kill was all gothic horror, drug induced flashbacks and nightmareish visions.  The whole thing looks like no other western, let alone spaghettier, heavy with religious symbolism and overt antipathy as people are slaughtered left right and centre.  Not surprisingly cut to ribbons in most major territories and banned outright everywhere else, Django Kill exists in numerous cuts, most of which are rubbish.  But any version running for 100 minutes plus is worth tracking down, with the holy grail being director Questi's original 120 minute cut, assembled mostly by (ironically enough) the BBC (with a little help from Alex Cox) from four or five different negatives from around the world, and released on DVD (with a further sprucing up) by Blue Underground. And it's this version that gets the 94 spot.

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