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Great Badir's Favourite Films - 19/12/2005 1:41:03 PM   
great_badir


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From: A breaking rope bridge in the middle of the jungle
This started out life (in another forum) as a standard top 100.  But as I read it back some 6 months after completing it, I realised that there were a load of films that I loved but couldn't write about and my opinions of some had changed.  So, somewhat reduxed, here's my top 100 with an added 50..............for what it's worth.

And, before ANYONE starts complaining about my choices, this is my own PERSONAL list.

Okay -


150

The Chain, Jack Gold (1984)
Barely heard of, let alone seen, British TV movie that had a very brief dalliance with the big screen.  A chain of house movers covering the entire class and social ladder in and around greater London are all linked by their much put-upon removal men, headed up by Warren Mitchell and Bernard Hill.  There's a thinly veiled Seven Deadly Sins theme bubbling away underneath the main action (there are seven people/families in the chain, each expressing different "sins"), but it takes a backseat to the wonderful character interplay and clever laughs as lower class removal man Warren Mitchell shows he possesses far more humanity and wisdom than any of the people he's moving.  DVD release soon, please.

< Message edited by great_badir -- 26/10/2009 8:26:29 PM >


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RE: great badir's top 150 films - 2/2/2006 5:09:39 PM   
livila


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Thanks Captain Black for pointing me in this direction.

I totally agree with Lawn Dogs - one of my favourite films, Mischa Barton is brilliant - as is Sam Rockwell.

I saw the Chain years ago, I think as part of Film Four season. I love Nigel Hawthorn, trying to unscrew the doorknobs, taking all the lightbulbs.

I've never heard of Juggernaut - looks intriguing...
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RE: great badir's top 150 films - 2/2/2006 6:40:28 PM   
bub


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From: A soon to be undead filled missile silo
A brilliant list so far keep up the good work. Poor wormy he only wanted to wipe his own arse

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RE: great badir's top 150 films - 2/2/2006 9:13:41 PM   
adamdavidsmith


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good luck, man hope LOTRS and SHAWSHANK are in there

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RE: great badir's top 150 films - 3/2/2006 9:49:42 AM   
great_badir


Posts: 4662
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From: A breaking rope bridge in the middle of the jungle
quote:

ORIGINAL: adamdavidsmith

good luck, man hope LOTRS and SHAWSHANK are in there


....................um............................you may be disappointed.........

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RE: great badir's top 150 films - 3/2/2006 10:07:50 AM   
The Don


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quote:

ORIGINAL: adamdavidsmith

good luck, man hope LOTRS and SHAWSHANK are in there

Wow, what a unique taste in films you have.

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RE: great badir's top 150 films - 3/2/2006 3:47:05 PM   
wrenster


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quote:

ORIGINAL: great_badir

137 Juggernaut, Richard Lester (1974)If you didn't think it was possible to make a low-key disaster film, then take this as a big wet-fish slap in the face.  Based on an incident aboard the QE2 a few years before where the government flew in bomb disposal experts after someone claimed to have planted bombs in the engine room (the bombs turned out to be a hoax but, as in the film, the bomb guys did fly in), the film features some classic suspense (Richard Harris and his crew dismantling the bombs piece by piece), brilliant acting (along with The Elephant Man, one of Anthony Hopkins' very few low key performances), genuine laughs (Roy Kinnear's stiff upper-lipped "social director" trying to keep everyone calm) and a killer montage sequence accompanied by the extremely cold message heading the above poster.


Wow! A really underrated thriller. Everyone seems to have forgotten about this little gem.

A good list so far. Nice to see that it's full of movies that most people wouldn't have heard of, let alone seen. Lawn Dogs is cracking and I had totally forgotten about Freaked. Keep up the good work.

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RE: great badir's top 150 films - 3/2/2006 3:51:24 PM   
CURIOUS_GEORGE


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quote:

ORIGINAL: The Don

quote:

ORIGINAL: adamdavidsmith

good luck, man hope LOTRS and SHAWSHANK are in there

Wow, what a unique taste in films you have.


Heheheh, just what I was going to say!


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RE: great badir's top 150 films - 3/2/2006 3:56:01 PM   
great_badir


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135 Les Yeux Sans Visage, Georges Franju (1959)Odd little slice of French nastiness that hasn't dated one jot since its release nearly 50 years ago and is unlike anything else to came out of that country................well, ever.  Eschewing out the burgeoning new-wave style loved by his fellow film-makers, Franju instead went all Michael Powell (or, more accurately, Powell later went all Franju with Peeping Tom) and ladled on the shocks, claustrophobia and measured in-your-face paranoia as a nutter-with-reason doctor kills attractive young women so he may graft their face onto that of his daughter, who was badly disfiguired in a car accident.  Whilst Franju doesn't paint his antagonist with too many friendly colours, it's still hard not to feel for the guy (a one-time life saving surgeon), who's just acting out of love for his daughter.  It took a really steady hand to pull this off without going all B-grade horror, but Franju managed it with aplomb.  Was also one of the first European films to feature clear product placement - most of the women's clothes were designed by Givenchy.   

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RE: great badir's top 150 films - 3/2/2006 3:56:38 PM   
great_badir


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134 La Planete Sauvage (Fantastic Planet), Rene Laloux (1973)Startling Czech/French co-production that is a thinly veiled commentary on the Russian occupancy of Czechoslovakia - a distant planet is ruled by giants (the Russians), whilst small human type people fight for their rights (the Czechs).  Plot-wise it's nothing special, being very reminiscent of Fritz Lang's Metropolis only on a simpler level, but the film's real genius lies in its style - seriously po-faced animation that broke free from the bulk industry standard of the time (ie family friendly Disney).  With pastel hues and loving attention to detail, the unique style (still unlike anything else before or since) can only be described as Lowry in close-up.  Though it tries too hard to put itself on the same intellectual level as Arthur C Clarke and Isaac Asimov with its science faction (many of the assumed technological advances have real-world possibilities, but aren't thought out anywhere near as well), none of it matters thanks to the wonderful images.  See the original French language version if you can.

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RE: great badir's top 150 films - 3/2/2006 4:16:30 PM   
great_badir


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From: A breaking rope bridge in the middle of the jungle
133 Evil Dead 2, Sam RaimiWith his latter day big budget and critic friendly credentials, is easy to forget where Raimi started.  Very much like Peter Jackson, Raimi's star has shone brighter with each passing project as more and more of his schlocky low budget beginnings are left behind.  The sequel/remake Evil Dead 2 will always be Sam's best and most consistently brilliant film.  Inventiveness in the face of zero budget alone has ensured that.  But it's only within the last decade or so (and endless DVD releases) that ED2 has shaken off its video nasty jacket to become something a bit more highly regarded.  And rightly so - amongst all the gloop, chainsaws, beheadings and boom-sticks, Raimi also crafted a great comedy and made a hero out of the much tortured Bruce Campbell.  ED2 is Campbell's movie without doubt - it may as well be a one-man show (indeed, the final act pretty much is) - but Raimi brings it all together wonderfully, crossing genres all over the place without ever making it over-egged.  And as ED2 can't really be mentioned without the other two installments..... Special mention: Though these days seen as the weakest part of the trilogy, The Evil Dead is still a fan favourite and proves that a lot can be done with very little.  Managing to do away with its awkward student movie opening in no time at all, Raimi cranks up the demonic effects with a less sure, but altogether much nastier hand.  Though the very last scene is a classic, the stand-out sequence has to be the lengthy Hitchcock-esque search through the hut - shot brilliantly and with Bruce at his paranoid best. andArmy Of Darkness at the time seemed like an odd way to finish the series (moving away from horror and more into fantasy), but it's every bit as crazy and entertaining as 2, with Raimi being able to indulge in his love of Harryhausen and stop-motion.  Straight away you can tell the film's working on another budget level altogether (pristine widescreen, good production values etc) and Bruce had now become a hero in his own right.  It's also one of the very few films to have both happy and not-so happy endings that are equally brilliant.

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RE: great badir's top 150 films - 3/2/2006 4:55:08 PM   
adamdavidsmith


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oh well, great-badir -  there so many other great ones!

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RE: great badir's top 150 films - 3/2/2006 5:41:30 PM   
Leomuse


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From: The Valley of the Dolls
Great thread this. I particularly like the inclusion of Lawn Dogs. It's a shame that Mischa Barton's acting skills seemed to have decreased in quality as she got older. Oh well, at least she looks nice.

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RE: great badir's top 150 films - 3/2/2006 6:19:09 PM   
Jack's Rage

 

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Great read as always Great Badir.  Your posts have some of the sharpest writing on this forum.  And I would just like to say that you have convinced me to check out some of the films you have chosen.

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RE: great badir's top 150 films - 4/2/2006 3:36:06 AM   
hozay


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From: the long,dark teatime of the soul
You're off to a good start.Particularly with Fantastic Planet.I've had the great
pleasure of seeing this on the big screen twice,(once a s a double bill with the
groundbreaking surf film Crystal Voyager - stoner heaven.).Predator2 is also
a great choice.
I entered your thread expecting to just see a straight up list.Thanks for making
the effort to write a little on each film and find pics.

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RE: great badir's top 150 films - 6/2/2006 9:03:46 AM   
great_badir


Posts: 4662
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From: A breaking rope bridge in the middle of the jungle
Thanks for the good comments. adamdavidsmith - don't get me wrong, I like Rings and Shawshank but, like Star Wars, they really don't reflect the stuff that really makes me tick.   I just want to take a little side-step from this for a moment (don't worry mods, and anyone else following me - the list will continue after this interlude) - Halfway through Werner Herzog's rather good Grizzly Man on Saturday night, I was struck with the realisation of how futile lists really are because for every film you include, you later remember another ten that could have been included just as easily - whilst looking through the coming week's TV schedule, I noticed that The Station Agent was showing on one of the Sky Cinema channels and I immediately thought "I should've put that in!!".  Then, last week, I was watching a program about the Challenger shuttle disaster and, during one slo-mo shot of the crew walking to their terrible fate, I didn't think "those poor guys" as I should have done, but I instead thought of Kaufman's The Right Stuff - how can a top 150 be without The Right Stuff!?!?!?!?  (I haven't, as it happens, added either one of them).  And when you think of those other choices you could have made, you then you go off on tangents and start to think on individual terms - director, genre, actor etc etc.  To take Herzog as an example, I have only a small handful of Herzog (one of my favourite directors) films on this list and, again during Grizzly Man, I realised that out of the fifty odd films (and counting) he's made, at least twenty of them more than deserve a placing in any top fifty and at least ten of those are masterpieces, running the full gamut from short, to documentary, to TV movie and feature films.  Of course, a list made up of Herzog films and little else will only make for interesting reading if you're a Herzog fan, but it's a good illustration of the point i'm making.   The other thing to note here is your mood at the time of watching - for every high-brow inclusion, one mood-swing later there may be something else you want to watch that couldn't be any more different.  I mean, who's to say that if I wasn't in the mood for, say, Les Yeux Sans Visage, that the film I go for would be Deuce Bigelow or some such!  To put it another way, ALL film fans always have those moments when their hand hovers over Kurosawa's Seven Samurai, before shrugging their shoulders and heading straight for The Magnificent Seven instead. Of the (probably) tens of thousands of films i've seen (more a sad confession to the hours i've spent glued to the screen, than a boast of prowess) in 23-odd years of film watching, coming up with 150 of what I consider to be the best was HARD.  My top 10 has always been fairly stable and made up of films that have been up there pretty much since I saw them, so that was easy.  But then thinking of 140 others???  As I said at the beginning of the thread, the list originally existed as a top 100 in another forum.  Since then, i've seen a lot of new films, re-watched a lot of older films and formed new opinions about films I wasn't sure about and, as such, one's opinions are bound to change and, comparing this 150 to the old 100 it's obvious to me that i've moved a fair amount of stuff around.  If I was to complete this by the end of this week (which I won't) and decided to do it all over again in a couple of week's time, i'm sure it won't be the same. At the end of the day, lists are merely self-serving ephemera and (If i'm honest) somewhat show-offy.  However, it is always good to know that someone reading all this (as in Jack's Rage's case) will go and seek out something they might not have previously considered seeing.  But still the fact remains that lists are very individual and far from an accurate picture of one person's real opinions. So, on that note, may the list continue!!!!!!!!!!

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RE: great badir's top 150 films - 6/2/2006 1:00:32 PM   
great_badir


Posts: 4662
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132 Almost Famous, Cameron Crowe (2000)   Though it seems to split fans down the middle, Crowe's semi-autobiographical love letter to music journalism (and the music itself) of the 70s is his most measured film to date and features very few of those cloying Crowe moments that can get slightly annoying after a time (i'm thinking of "you complete me", to name but one).  I'm gonna plump for the meaty director's (or bootleg) cut here, due to the superb fleshing out of the principal characters and the overall journey-like mood.  Not that the theatrical version is worthless, mind - it zips along nicely and feels like a much happier piece of work (presumably why he decided to go with it for theatrical release and save his own cut for DVD), but the director's cut seems more real and is, arguably, more rewarding if at times hard going.  It's especially rewarding for fans of 70s rock with lots of spiritual nods to The Allman Brothers Band, Lynyrd Skynyrd and all those other hairy Southern rockers.  Although it would have benefitted greatly from more of Philip Seymour Hoffman as Lester Bangs, it's clear that Crowe has the utmost respect for the story and never short changes the audience.  Best bit (aside from the brilliantly scripted near plane crash moment) is, ironically, the big Crowe moment of the whole film - the busride sing along to Elton John's Tiny Dancer.   

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RE: great badir's top 150 films - 6/2/2006 1:01:25 PM   
great_badir


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From: A breaking rope bridge in the middle of the jungle
131 Black Rain, Ridley Scott (1989)Not to be confused with the rather excellent Japanese drama of the same name, Black Rain has far more going on than neon and a big haired Michael Douglas.  What appears, at first, to be your typical 80s cop movie very quickly reveals itself to be a bleak and morally vague man-out-of-his-depth thriller.  Black Rain, of course, contains one of the defining images of 80s cinema - Andy Garcia getting beheaded by a Samurai sword wielding biker, a scene that whips the carpet from under your feet the first time you see it - and, being a Ridley Scott film, it looks amazing.  But more than that it's a complex and involved little story that takes in counterfeiting, police corruption, the atomic bombs dropped on Japan and Yakuza hierarchy.  Even though, in reality, Douglas's character probably wouldn't have lasted more than ten minutes taking on these very tough bad guys, it's all gripping stuff to the finish and entirely believable, thanks mainly to the top drawer low-key performances from Douglas and Ken Takakura.  Hell, even Kate Capshaw is pretty good in it!  

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RE: great badir's top 150 films - 6/2/2006 4:08:19 PM   
great_badir


Posts: 4662
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From: A breaking rope bridge in the middle of the jungle
130 The Quiet Earth, Geoff Murphy (1985)Genius little New Zealand flick championed early on by BBC2.  Bruno Lawrence believes that he is the last man alive in NZ, if not the entire planet after a freak accident at a government research plant.  He soon discovers two other people (one man and one woman) and bit by bit their characters crack as cabin fever, jealousy and madness take over.  Though peppered with plenty of belly-laugh moments (most notably Lawrence's slow transformation into a Hitler-esque figure, barking to an audience of cardboard cut-outs), the film focusses on paranoia and trust and it's all expertly handled with the minimum of fuss.  Lawrence is brilliant, beginning the film as a scared and confused loner, before realising that the city is his playground.  As he grows accustomed to his new found solitary existence, the possible threats the two other survivors bring with them play out all too realistically - it's almost like a raw Mike Leigh drama played out in sci-fi terrotory.  Most famous moment, however, is the now classic finale (as illustrated by the above image) in which Lawrence finally gets to be completely alone.  Cue shivers down the spine. Special mention:Barry Peak's As Time Goes By (1988) features some of the same crew and production team (as well as Bruno Lawrence) as The Quiet Earth and followed hot on that film's heels with BBC2's late 80s love for quirky Down Under product.  Though by no means a classic, ATGB is nevertheless inventive and wholly original (aside from a central riff on Joe Dante's The Explorers).  The only sufficient way to explain what it's about (despite the ultra low budget, it's pretty convoluted) is to paste in this synopsis:    Mike Taggart has persuaded two women friends to drive him out to go surfing in the middle of the Australian Outback. But after arguing they dump him in the middle of nowhere not far from the town of Dingo. In the township he reveals that on her deathbed his mother gave him a note that was given to her 25 years before telling him to meet someone at a place called Joe Bogart's 50 miles west of Dingo tomorrow. He is hoping it may offer some clue as to who his father is. There proves to be nothing at the specified location, however the following day a diner called Joe Bogart's has appeared on the spot. Inside Mike meets the green-skinned Joe Bogart who claims to be an alien. Bogart left the note with Mike's mother in order to bring Mike here because he needs Mike's help in finding a lost power capsule so that he can travel back in time and prevent the Japanese from winning World War II. In trying to help Bogart sort history out, Mike is caught up between various townspeople, astrophysicists, businessmen and sheep rustlers who want the power source and mistakenly believe that Mike is the alien.     What this synopsis doesn't say (and this is where the Dante riff comes in) is that Joe Bogart has learnt everything he knows about Earth from the radio, which makes for plenty of amusing dialogue.

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RE: great badir's top 150 films - 6/2/2006 4:08:49 PM   
great_badir


Posts: 4662
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From: A breaking rope bridge in the middle of the jungle
129 Dances With Wolves, Kevin Costner (1990)Thirteen Days and JFK aside, Kev's self-directed (and debut to boot) Enormoscope civil war drama remains the most admirable film of his career to date.  Again, i'll go with the director's cut, not because it adds any substantial worth to the plot as it is, but (like the reduxed Apocalypse Now) because I think it nicely beefs up the Wolves universe and smooths its edges.  Whatever you think of Costner (as actor or director), you have to admit that Wolves is an impressive piece of work.  Remarkably confident for a rookie director, Kev oversees the whole thing with a steady hand all at the same time as pulling off a brilliant performance as John Dunbar.  And, even though its romantic sub-plot is a teeny bit suspect (Mary McDonnell a tad miscast as the white orphan raised by the native tribe), it's still a wonderous 4-odd hours, with the main attraction being its lush cinematography.  Just a shame Kev didn't keep his moustache! 

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RE: great badir's top 150 films - 6/2/2006 4:09:32 PM   
great_badir


Posts: 4662
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From: A breaking rope bridge in the middle of the jungle
128 Big Trouble In Little China, John Carpenter (1986)Carpenter's much maligned comedy/fantasy/horror is now picking up pace as one of his best films.  It's hellishly enjoyable and the only time that the Carpenter/Russell comedy double act (that's been a great comedy partnership on DVD commentaries for a few years now) has been caught on film.  Much misunderstood on its original release (critics and audiences thought that Jack Burton wasn't a very good action hero.......well, that's the point), it took a decade of scrutiny before the faithful cult of followers made everyone else realise it deserved a second chance.  Good thing too, as Big Trouble is stuffed to the brim with memorable moments - Russell's hilarious turn as Burton (his undercover speccy, brown tweed brothel customer is worth the price of admission alone), the wind guy blowing himself up, Lo-Pan, the Carpenter sung theme tune ("biiiiiiiiiig trouble..............in little Chiiiiiiiiina!") and accompanying video and the wonderful little hood-wink at the end.  Big Trouble is one of those films you can sit down and just enjoy at any time.

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RE: great badir's top 150 films - 6/2/2006 4:26:55 PM   
rikkie


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From: Ego Tripping At The Gates Of Hell
Fraid you just lost me there with Black Rain me old mucker.  I can happily say hand on heart that it was one of the top 10 (yay, lists for everything) worst cinematic experiences ever for me.  I had such high hopes for it but I genuinely cannot think of one single redeeming point with the film.  It rubbed me completely and utterly up the wrong way and is by far and away Scott's worst film by my reckoning... 

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RE: great badir's top 150 films - 6/2/2006 4:33:09 PM   
great_badir


Posts: 4662
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From: A breaking rope bridge in the middle of the jungle
quote:

ORIGINAL: rikkie

Fraid you just lost me there with Black Rain me old mucker.  I can happily say hand on heart that it was one of the top 10 (yay, lists for everything) worst cinematic experiences ever for me.  I had such high hopes for it but I genuinely cannot think of one single redeeming point with the film.  It rubbed me completely and utterly up the wrong way and is by far and away Scott's worst film by my reckoning... 


Surely no worse than GI Jane or Hannibal!?!??!?!

But I understand - there are a lot of people who don't like Black Rain, but i've always thought that there's so much more going on than it appears, and it's dripping with a misanthropic atmos that I just love in films.  Same thing with Friedkin's Sorcerer (to come later on in the list).

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RE: great badir's top 150 films - 6/2/2006 4:38:17 PM   
Mycroft


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Great stuff as usual. Hope there's room for some more Douglas in there somewhere, im an unapologetic fan. The Game? Romancing the Stone? 

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RE: great badir's top 150 films - 6/2/2006 4:40:42 PM   
great_badir


Posts: 4662
Joined: 6/10/2005
From: A breaking rope bridge in the middle of the jungle
quote:

ORIGINAL: Mycroft

Great stuff as usual. Hope there's room for some more Douglas in there somewhere, im an unapologetic fan. The Game? Romancing the Stone? 



Maaaaaaaaaaaaayyyyyyyyyyyyyyyybe...............

Stay tuned.

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RE: great badir's top 150 films - 6/2/2006 4:47:34 PM   
rikkie


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From: Ego Tripping At The Gates Of Hell
quote:

ORIGINAL: great_badir

Surely no worse than GI Jane or Hannibal!?!??!?!

But I understand - there are a lot of people who don't like Black Rain, but i've always thought that there's so much more going on than it appears, and it's dripping with a misanthropic atmos that I just love in films.  Same thing with Friedkin's Sorcerer (to come later on in the list).


Shite...  Forgot about GI Jane.  Actually I didn't hate it that much, purely because I was expecting rubbish, so I then found it vaguely entertaining tosh.  But it certainly didn't offend me in the way Black Rain did.

As for Hannibal, I hated the book so much that the film just had to be an improvement, which it was, so I was just thankful for that.

I've still not bloody seen Sorceror and it's an eternal arse (I absolutely love The Wages Of Fear).  I've never seen it crop up on TV at all, and it's not available on R2, so looks like I'll be waiting a while longer...


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RE: great badir's top 150 films - 6/2/2006 6:55:50 PM   
adamdavidsmith


Posts: 2558
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quote:

ORIGINAL: great_badir

Thanks for the good comments. adamdavidsmith - don't get me wrong, I like Rings and Shawshank but, like Star Wars, they really don't reflect the stuff that really makes me tick

(tiny spoiler, for the top 201 poll)

cheers, very thoughtful of you

by the way good on you for putting Dances with Wolves in your list - a magnificent film (annoyed me that it was not in the top 201 list)

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RE: great badir's top 150 films - 6/2/2006 6:58:39 PM   
Leomuse


Posts: 3401
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From: The Valley of the Dolls
quote:

ORIGINAL: great_badir


132 Almost Famous, Cameron Crowe (2000)  



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Post #: 28
RE: great badir's top 150 films - 6/2/2006 7:04:36 PM   
DanielFullard


Posts: 1025
Joined: 19/10/2005
From: Durham, England
Im enjoying this list mate. Some good, often underrated stuff on there.

Keep it up!

_____________________________

You know, the very powerful and the very stupid have one thing in common. They don't alter their views to fit the facts. They alter the facts to fit their views. Which can be uncomfortable if you happen to be one of the facts that need altering.

(in reply to Leomuse)
Post #: 29
RE: great badir's top 150 films - 7/2/2006 1:18:18 PM   
great_badir


Posts: 4662
Joined: 6/10/2005
From: A breaking rope bridge in the middle of the jungle
127 Les Vacances de M. Hulot, Jacques Tati (1953)Near silent masterpiece, containing the funniest tennis serve.  Ever.  Though not quite the best of Tati's many great films (that accolade goes to the masterful, if slightly overlong Playtime - not included in this list due to the very specific mood one has to be in to watch it), Hulot debut Vacances is without doubt the funniest.  At a time when the majority of French cinema was heavy going, introspective drama, Tati was churning out deft slapstick without coming over all Chaplin or Keaton.  An obvious influence on Jerry Lewis (see The Bellhop for all manner of nods to Tati), Tati was one of the earliest heroes of (then) modern film comedy, later to be joined by the likes of Peter Sellers, Tony Hancock and the aforementioned Lewis.  Though his range was, arguably, fairly limited, Tati did what he did brilliantly and wisely never milked it.  Often ripped to shreds outside of France (presumably with all the non-comedy parts removed to speed things up a little), it took decades for the full version to be restored to its original glory, now available on an otherwise mediocre Criterion DVD.

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FAVE FILMS
BO BOMBS

(in reply to DanielFullard)
Post #: 30
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