Register  |   Log In  |  
Sign up to our weekly newsletter    
Follow us on   
Search   
Forum Home Register for Free! Log In Moderator Tickets FAQ Users Online

RE: Hammer Horror

 
Logged in as: Guest
  Printable Version
All Forums >> [Film Forums] >> Golden Oldies >> RE: Hammer Horror Page: <<   < prev  4 5 [6] 7 8   next >   >>
Login
Message << Older Topic   Newer Topic >>
RE: Hammer Horror - 15/12/2010 9:36:24 AM   
filmscene

 

Posts: 13
Joined: 21/8/2010
Paul,

It's better than that

Vampire Circus has just been released as a combi Blu ray & standard DVD, so rejoice now!!

(in reply to paul.mccluskey)
Post #: 151
RE: Hammer Horror - 26/1/2011 4:34:32 PM   
mad_looney


Posts: 1620
Joined: 6/10/2005
From: The Fridge
I got the boxset for christmas and have fallen in love with the films, some are camp and cheesy as hell but a few are just the right side of creepy (e.g. the nanny and the witches) alas the boxset doesnt have dracula or frankenstien

_____________________________

Head of Military and Defence for the Peoples Republic of Empiria

http://www.myspace.com/fudzistan

Have your eyes ever been checked?
No Doctor, they've always been blue

(in reply to filmscene)
Post #: 152
RE: Hammer Horror - 28/1/2011 8:09:24 PM   
paul.mccluskey


Posts: 5182
Joined: 15/4/2007
From: Port Glasgow, Scotland, UK
Artwork for Vampire Circus:


(in reply to mad_looney)
Post #: 153
RE: Hammer Horror - 12/3/2011 6:47:30 PM   
DazDaMan


Posts: 10109
Joined: 8/9/2006
From: Penicuik - a right shithole
Is that any good? I've never seen it.

_____________________________

You fucking fuckers are gonna do what I say or I'm going to stick my foot so far up your assholes you'll rue the day you crawled out of your mother's twat!

(in reply to paul.mccluskey)
Post #: 154
RE: Hammer Horror - 13/3/2011 9:53:47 PM   
Dr Lenera

 

Posts: 4038
Joined: 19/10/2005
Vampire Circus is a late minor classic from Hammer, possibly their best 70s film.  Has that great Hammer Gothic fairytale feel in abundance but also adds rather more gore and brutality than was usual for the company.

_____________________________

check out more of my reviews on http://horrorcultfilms.co.uk/

(in reply to DazDaMan)
Post #: 155
RE: Hammer Horror - 7/4/2011 6:54:27 PM   
Dr Lenera

 

Posts: 4038
Joined: 19/10/2005
 
Count Mitterhaus is a vampire who preys on the children on the town of Stetl and has seduced  Anna, the wife of Prof. Albert Mueller.  A group of villagers attack the castle and stake Mitterhaus, after which Anna is brutally beaten with belts and forced out of town.  The castle is then set alight.  Fifteen years later, and Stetl is dying, literally, as a plague is slowly killing off the people.   Then a mysterious circus, headed by a gypsy woman, comes to town, and offers the townsfolk some escape from their troubled lives.  A dwarf and a strongman provide laughs and other people seem to change into animals, but there is something sinister about this circus and two children disappear…..

  Hammer Films, although they’d been around since the 1930s, first really made a splash in the late 50s with their colourful and gory well, for their time!] horror tales, which often reworked material done decade before by Universal, such as The Curse Of Frankenstein and Dracula. They remained popular for most of the 60s, developing a house style which is critically much admired now [though wasn’t much at the time] and, because they were made cheaply, the majority of their films were very successful.  However, by the late 60s Hammer's period Gothic stories started to seem staid and old fashioned, especially with films like Rosemary’s Baby and Night Of The Living Dead [both 1968] which had a fresher, more modern and more downright shocking approach.  In the early part of the 70s, Hammer attempted to bite [sorry!] back with twists on their usual subject matter, such as Captain Kronos, Vampire Circus and Dr Jekyll And Sister Hyde, not to mention three films about lesbian vampires.  Some of these efforts were successful, some weren’t, and they didn’t really succeed in reviving the company, which died a slow death.  There are some gems though, and one of my favourites from that era is Vampire Circus, a vibrant, imaginative and very brutal twist on Dracula themes which sadly did only mediocre box office business.  It was filmed at Pinewood Studios over six weeks, as was usual for the company.  Director Robert Young fell badly behind and after the six weeks were up wasn’t allowed to shoot any more footage, so he had to cut around the missing material. The BBFC passed the film uncut, but in the US, three minutes were removed to get an ‘R’ rating.  Indeed the film is very bloody in places, it may be Hammer’s most vicious film, but it’s also very interesting.

Vampire Circus begins with a stunning pre-title prologue lasting ten minutes or so, which functions as a great little film in its own right.  A young girl is led into the castle by Anna and then seduced and bitten by Mitterhaus, after which Anna and Mitterhaus have sex.  So here we have child murder and something that borders on paedophilia, and we are immediately aware that, despite the period setting and the Gothic trappings, this isn’t your usual Hammer fare, but something nastier.  The villagers turn up, and after a bloody fight with impalements and a throat being graphically slit, Mitterhaus is killed and Anna runs the ‘gauntlet’ of being beaten with belts.  Phew!  Upon first viewing I really wandered it the rest of the film would live up to this opening, but, for a while at least, it does.  The early sequences of the circus [which utilised some real circus performers] playing to the villagers have a striking sense of wonder to them.  A boy and a girl jump into the air and become bats, a panther becomes a man [scenes which are achieved by simple jump cuts and are the better for it] and a leopard woman does an erotic dance.  All this under the rather creepy [he has a horrible laugh] dwarf ringmaster and the occasional interventions of the strongman.  We share the curiosity of the villagers and even start to like these odd but very sensual folk, because they are a lot more interesting than the dull, uptight villagers.  Some really uncanny tricks are played with mirrors, some of which show things like Mitterhaus, and ,as things turn nasty, this really seem to be shaping up to be a great horror movie.

Unfortunately the second half doesn’t really fulfil the greatness of the first half. The film’s fast pace, some of which is due to it not being finished, becomes a problem as it becomes increasingly obvious that scenes and bits of scenes are missing. From a panther attack in the woods to dashes past the blockade around the village, the action is almost constant, and the gore level remains quite high [even the vampire bite marks look really gruesome and there's a stunning decapitation by crossbow!] but there’s little actual tension and proceedings become a little incoherent.  When Mueller eventually recognises the gypsy woman as being Anna his-wife [despite the fact they’re played by two different people] little is made of it and it’s quickly forgotten.  No confrontation scene between the two-nothing!   Things which we should see sometimes occur off screen [although one scene, where a panther attacks some students in a room, is actually rather effective by not being shown, just heard] and the fights and chases which wind things up are quite poorly staged.   As for Mitterhaus, he’s brought back to life for about five seconds than killed again.  The special effects are even more shoddy than usual for Hammer, with ineptly front projected bats to close ups of a model panther face representing the panther attack.  The circus folk remain shrouded in mystery though I rather like it that way, and I also like the huge teeth these vampires have.  There is also a partial sense of a Jacobean revenge tragedy in the final act as all but two of the main characters end up dead.

Director Robert Young seems hampered by his budget and doesn’t quite the tone right, while the acting is reasonable if nothing special.  John Moulder-Brown is a rather wet hero, which you could say about many of Hammer’s young leading men, but usually that fact was unimportant if Christopher Lee or Peter Cushing were in the movie!  David Whitaker provides a rather grand and striking score, loud and bombastic in the manner of Hammer’s usual composer James Bernard.  Vampire Circus has a great deal to recommend it, it’s never dull and but I can’t help thinking of the film it could have been, rather than the film it is.  There’s a scene about half way through where the twins have lured two children into that wonderful room of mirrors, and as the camera starts to spin round them and the children are hypnotised by the twins, who move closer and closer to bite them, there is a real sense of transgressive horror, without actually crossing the line into sickness.  It’s a striking scene, and there are other parts of Vampire Circus which are magnificent.  I think that if finished properly, it could have been one of the best vampire movies of all.  Sadly, it wasn’t, and the world of horror movies is the worst for it.
7/10


_____________________________

check out more of my reviews on http://horrorcultfilms.co.uk/

(in reply to Dr Lenera)
Post #: 156
RE: Hammer Horror - 7/4/2011 7:45:54 PM   
Gkel

 

Posts: 174
Joined: 29/3/2011
Hammer's output was great--they had such variety. The horror stuff obviously is the best known but they made a few pirate adventure, fantasy historical-- not so memorable perhaps but even the worst are still watchable or  amusing as curiosities.



_____________________________


"Eat recycled food. Recycled food is good for the environment and ok for you."

(in reply to filmscene)
Post #: 157
The Gorgon, one of Terence Fisher's most undervalued... - 11/4/2011 7:39:26 PM   
JohnChard

 

Posts: 181
Joined: 22/10/2009
From: Birmingham
...film's.

"Overshadowing the village of Vandorf stands the Castle Borski. From the turn of the century a monster from an ancient age of history came to live here. No living thing survived and the spectre of death hovered in waiting for her next victim."

Directed by Terence Fisher for Hammer Film Productions, The Gorgon stars Peter Cushing, Christopher Lee, Barbara Shelley and Richard Pasco. Photography is by Michael Reed, the design courtesy of Bernard Robinson and the unique score is by James Bernard (he blended Soprano with a Novachord). Very much a bit off kilter in terms of classical Hammer Horror, The Gorgon sees Hammer turn to Greek Mythology for its latest instalment.

The key issue here is that The Gorgon should be viewed more as a doomed love story featuring a legendary horror character. To call this a horror film is just wrong, and marketing it a such has done the film few favours over the years. Fisher always thought of The Gorgon as one of his best film's, and he was right to do so for it's a hauntingly beautiful piece of work, that is also one of Hammer's most visually accomplished efforts. Yes the effects of the Gorgon herself come the finale are low budgeted naffness, to which if it had been possible to never show close ups of her the film would have been greater. More so because all the prior long distance shots of her have gained maximum chill factor. A floaty green demon accompanied by eerie music, effectively shot in dreamy Technicolor by Michael Reed. But cest la vie, the story is such we have to have these close ups, so lets just embrace this minor itch for existing in a time before CGI and applaud its adherence to the Gothic tradition that the film faithfully captures.

Tho featuring the big Hammer Horror hitters Cushing & Lee, it's Barbara Shelley who really takes the honours. Her Carla Hoffman is the axis of the movie, an emotionally conflicted character, beautiful yet sorrowful, she gets an in-depth makeover from Shelley. Further lifting the film above the average jibes bestowed on it by cruel and unfair critics. Patrick Troughton also lends some good support as Inspector Kanof, wonderfully attired in Rosemary Burrows' Gothic European costumes. There's no bad performances in truth, all the cast are delivering good work to do justice to the material. There is no, if you pardon the pun, ham in this Hammer Horror.

A wonderfully told story is given a smart technical work over within the budget restrictions. Forget any hopes of a blood laden movie, for this is not the one. But if you yearn for Gothic atmosphere or prefer a hauntingly told tale, then this is for you. 7/10

< Message edited by JohnChard -- 11/4/2011 7:43:30 PM >


_____________________________

"Out you get Hooky, you`ve done your bit"

(in reply to matty_b)
Post #: 158
RE: The Gorgon, one of Terence Fisher's most undervalue... - 11/4/2011 10:52:20 PM   
DazDaMan


Posts: 10109
Joined: 8/9/2006
From: Penicuik - a right shithole
Sitting watching Fright Night for the nth time, and I've just realised that the clip of the horror film seen just after Jerry Dandridge has visited Charlie in his bedroom is from Scars of Dracula - at least I'm 95% sure it is!

_____________________________

You fucking fuckers are gonna do what I say or I'm going to stick my foot so far up your assholes you'll rue the day you crawled out of your mother's twat!

(in reply to JohnChard)
Post #: 159
RE: Scars of Dracula - 12/4/2011 4:00:43 AM   
Gkel

 

Posts: 174
Joined: 29/3/2011
It was Scars of Dracula.
The one Hammer Dracula film I had trouble tracking down for a long time--its ok although the leads are so boring.

Best scene is when he puts the hot sword to Patrick Troughton's back.

"I've been bad master!"





_____________________________


"Eat recycled food. Recycled food is good for the environment and ok for you."

(in reply to DazDaMan)
Post #: 160
RE: Scars of Dracula - 12/4/2011 8:09:39 AM   
DazDaMan


Posts: 10109
Joined: 8/9/2006
From: Penicuik - a right shithole
I have to say, it's probably my least favourite of the Gothic Hammer Dracula movies. For a start, the previous sequels started just where the previous film ended. However, Taste the Blood of Dracula (one of my favourites) ended in an old church - but Scars seems to begin back in Dracula's castle?! Where's the continuity??

It's the one I've watched least out of all seven, so perhaps I should give it another chance?

_____________________________

You fucking fuckers are gonna do what I say or I'm going to stick my foot so far up your assholes you'll rue the day you crawled out of your mother's twat!

(in reply to Gkel)
Post #: 161
RE: Scars of Dracula - 13/4/2011 2:18:16 AM   
Gkel

 

Posts: 174
Joined: 29/3/2011
From what i gather Scars was something of  a reboot just like Horror of Frankenstein.
Lee has more dialogue than any of the previous ones combined or it seems that way.

The leads really are so dull although Michael Ripper has more to do than usual.
Its Troughton's weirdo assistant that stands out for me, whistling while he's cleaning up the bloodbath caused by Dracula.

But its the kind of movie you forget after you watch it.I tend to think-hey i should watch that again-then after I do I realize why I didnt watch it regularly.
The dvd has a commentary by Lee so I should check that out.

I can understand why Dracula bothered him so much-they made him such a background character. I liked Taste the Blood of Dracula-great intro-but he might as well have not been in it at all--4 lines of dialogue?
Perhaps they originally planned for Bates to become the vampire. But the characters were far more interesting than the ones in Scars. The brother who goes to the castle first was ok but what the hell happened with the others? Bad bad casting.




< Message edited by Gkel -- 13/4/2011 2:24:53 AM >


_____________________________


"Eat recycled food. Recycled food is good for the environment and ok for you."

(in reply to DazDaMan)
Post #: 162
RE: Scars of Dracula - 13/4/2011 8:04:00 AM   
DazDaMan


Posts: 10109
Joined: 8/9/2006
From: Penicuik - a right shithole
Taste the Blood of Dracula was the first one I saw - and I bloody loved it! But yeah, Dracula seems to be a supporting character rather than the lead. But Christopher Lee dominates every scene he's in, regardless. That is, unless he's up against Peter Cushing....!

_____________________________

You fucking fuckers are gonna do what I say or I'm going to stick my foot so far up your assholes you'll rue the day you crawled out of your mother's twat!

(in reply to Gkel)
Post #: 163
RE: Scars of Dracula - 13/4/2011 1:17:25 PM   
paul.mccluskey


Posts: 5182
Joined: 15/4/2007
From: Port Glasgow, Scotland, UK
Scars of Dracula was the first Hammer film I seen... aged 9 ! I was so engrossed, lots of gore, and Christopher Lee was just awesome. It's the most violent of the series, but the best sequel is definitely Taste the Blood of Dracula. That film is truly dark.

(in reply to DazDaMan)
Post #: 164
RE: Scars of Dracula - 13/4/2011 4:54:07 PM   
DazDaMan


Posts: 10109
Joined: 8/9/2006
From: Penicuik - a right shithole
The first one (Horror of Dracula for our transatlantic cousins!) is still by far the best one, though...

_____________________________

You fucking fuckers are gonna do what I say or I'm going to stick my foot so far up your assholes you'll rue the day you crawled out of your mother's twat!

(in reply to paul.mccluskey)
Post #: 165
RE: Scars of Dracula - 13/4/2011 5:28:57 PM   
Gkel

 

Posts: 174
Joined: 29/3/2011
Many Hammer movies I only knew through books and magazines until about a decade ago when a guy started sending me vhs copies of  ones he had collected. He had left England for Canada at an early age and was obsessed with the culture so he collected all sorts of movies and tv shows. I would make a little  sculpture of the Reptile or Grymdyke from Tales From the Crypt in return for movies.I also painted him a Steptoe and Son picture(I didnt know Sanford and Son was inspired by that) I think he got more value out of trade since I replaced all my copies with dvds.

I had seen Curse of the Werewolf, Phantom of the Opera (Lom totally aces that part: "You think you can be great without suffering? Do you think that I  have not suffered?") a few times on tv, and a couple of later Hammers like TTBOD and Frankenstein Must be Destroyed, Dracula AD 72 (might have been the first I remembered seeing) but many werent aired on tv where I was.
The first Dracula I didnt care for much-the dialogue drove me crazy at times-I think the writer had started out as a set decorator? There was an anecdote I heard in which Lee complained he didnt have much dialogue and Cushing replied: be thankful for small mercies.
Although it had a good death scene for Dracula.

The Frankenstein series was way better I thought--not sure if there is any of them that I dont care for. I didnt see Monster From Hell until last and I think it was a decent ending. Not so serious but had one ugly David Prowse monster.







< Message edited by Gkel -- 13/4/2011 7:11:58 PM >


_____________________________


"Eat recycled food. Recycled food is good for the environment and ok for you."

(in reply to DazDaMan)
Post #: 166
RE: Scars of Dracula - 15/4/2011 10:42:14 PM   
rich


Posts: 5189
Joined: 30/9/2005
From: Neo Kobe
quote:

ORIGINAL: DazDaMan

The first one (Horror of Dracula for our transatlantic cousins!) is still by far the best one, though...


Agreed. The sequels are pretty much rubbish apart from Prince of Darkness and Scars Of Dracula.

Must watch some more of these again, in the mood for The Devil Rides Out...


_____________________________

Meanwhile...

(in reply to DazDaMan)
Post #: 167
RE: Scars of Dracula - 16/4/2011 7:57:00 AM   
DazDaMan


Posts: 10109
Joined: 8/9/2006
From: Penicuik - a right shithole
I've got The Devil Rides Out on DVD - but never gotten around to watching it!

_____________________________

You fucking fuckers are gonna do what I say or I'm going to stick my foot so far up your assholes you'll rue the day you crawled out of your mother's twat!

(in reply to rich)
Post #: 168
RE: Scars of Dracula - 16/4/2011 8:43:53 AM   
matty_b


Posts: 14582
Joined: 19/10/2005
From: Outpost 31 calling McMurtle.
quote:

ORIGINAL: rich

quote:

ORIGINAL: DazDaMan

The first one (Horror of Dracula for our transatlantic cousins!) is still by far the best one, though...


Agreed. The sequels are pretty much rubbish apart from Prince of Darkness and Scars Of Dracula.

Must watch some more of these again, in the mood for The Devil Rides Out...



It's a bit of a cheat, because he's not actually in it, but Brides of Dracula is pretty fantastic, too.

_____________________________

quote:

ORIGINAL: Cool Breeze
Mattyb is a shining example of what the perfect Empire Forum member is.


(in reply to rich)
Post #: 169
RE: The Gorgon, one of Terence Fisher's most undervalue... - 23/4/2011 7:49:47 PM   
Dr Lenera

 

Posts: 4038
Joined: 19/10/2005
quote:

ORIGINAL: JohnChard

...film's.

"Overshadowing the village of Vandorf stands the Castle Borski. From the turn of the century a monster from an ancient age of history came to live here. No living thing survived and the spectre of death hovered in waiting for her next victim."

Directed by Terence Fisher for Hammer Film Productions, The Gorgon stars Peter Cushing, Christopher Lee, Barbara Shelley and Richard Pasco. Photography is by Michael Reed, the design courtesy of Bernard Robinson and the unique score is by James Bernard (he blended Soprano with a Novachord). Very much a bit off kilter in terms of classical Hammer Horror, The Gorgon sees Hammer turn to Greek Mythology for its latest instalment.

The key issue here is that The Gorgon should be viewed more as a doomed love story featuring a legendary horror character. To call this a horror film is just wrong, and marketing it a such has done the film few favours over the years. Fisher always thought of The Gorgon as one of his best film's, and he was right to do so for it's a hauntingly beautiful piece of work, that is also one of Hammer's most visually accomplished efforts. Yes the effects of the Gorgon herself come the finale are low budgeted naffness, to which if it had been possible to never show close ups of her the film would have been greater. More so because all the prior long distance shots of her have gained maximum chill factor. A floaty green demon accompanied by eerie music, effectively shot in dreamy Technicolor by Michael Reed. But cest la vie, the story is such we have to have these close ups, so lets just embrace this minor itch for existing in a time before CGI and applaud its adherence to the Gothic tradition that the film faithfully captures.

Tho featuring the big Hammer Horror hitters Cushing & Lee, it's Barbara Shelley who really takes the honours. Her Carla Hoffman is the axis of the movie, an emotionally conflicted character, beautiful yet sorrowful, she gets an in-depth makeover from Shelley. Further lifting the film above the average jibes bestowed on it by cruel and unfair critics. Patrick Troughton also lends some good support as Inspector Kanof, wonderfully attired in Rosemary Burrows' Gothic European costumes. There's no bad performances in truth, all the cast are delivering good work to do justice to the material. There is no, if you pardon the pun, ham in this Hammer Horror.

A wonderfully told story is given a smart technical work over within the budget restrictions. Forget any hopes of a blood laden movie, for this is not the one. But if you yearn for Gothic atmosphere or prefer a hauntingly told tale, then this is for you. 7/10


One of my favourites!!


_____________________________

check out more of my reviews on http://horrorcultfilms.co.uk/

(in reply to JohnChard)
Post #: 170
RE: Scars of Dracula - 23/4/2011 7:51:40 PM   
Dr Lenera

 

Posts: 4038
Joined: 19/10/2005
quote:

ORIGINAL: DazDaMan

I've got The Devil Rides Out on DVD - but never gotten around to watching it!


Quite simply- one of their very best.  Really thrilling stuff that only goes a bit downhill towards the end.


_____________________________

check out more of my reviews on http://horrorcultfilms.co.uk/

(in reply to DazDaMan)
Post #: 171
RE: Scars of Dracula - 24/4/2011 10:03:36 PM   
DazDaMan


Posts: 10109
Joined: 8/9/2006
From: Penicuik - a right shithole
I'll watch it soon, then...

_____________________________

You fucking fuckers are gonna do what I say or I'm going to stick my foot so far up your assholes you'll rue the day you crawled out of your mother's twat!

(in reply to Dr Lenera)
Post #: 172
RE: Hammer Horror - 13/5/2011 10:13:03 AM   
filmburner30

 

Posts: 1556
Joined: 5/12/2006
From: guildford
For me growing up as a kid Hammer and it rival Amicus made top drawer Brit Horror.

Fear In the Night was one i remeber with a nasty performance from Joan Collins and a very odd one From Peter Cushing.

But my absolute fave is Quatermass and The Pit the 1967 classic directed by Roy Ward Baker and written by the great Nigel Kneale.

Its not tecnically a horror film but it has sevevral scary Moments and in my View Andrew Keir was the perfect Quatermass.

Also these are not Hammer films but they arestill great 70s Brit Horror

And Soon the Darkness the orginal 70s missing girl classic

Pshycomania -Don Sharps mega weird Biker movie

Deathline -Terror on the Underground

_____________________________

"Where are you calling from Milo?"
"The bottom of the pool?"

"Im The Anti Christ.You got me in a Vendetta kind of mood"

"Come back Alan , You Wanker!"

"Your a Doctor,Deal with it"

(in reply to paul.mccluskey)
Post #: 173
RE: Hammer Horror - 19/5/2011 5:24:43 AM   
Gkel

 

Posts: 174
Joined: 29/3/2011
quote:

ORIGINAL: filmburner30

For me growing up as a kid Hammer and it rival Amicus made top drawer Brit Horror.

Fear In the Night was one i remeber with a nasty performance from Joan Collins and a very odd one From Peter Cushing.


Also these are not Hammer films but they arestill great 70s Brit Horror

And Soon the Darkness the orginal 70s missing girl classic


Deathline -Terror on the Underground


*havent seen these ones-especially curious about Fear in the Night.
but I dont want anything spoiled so I will have to seek it blindly. Interesting how everyone and their cousin was making a horror movie back then--another Cushing one---name escapes me for a moment-think it was Corruption, where he plays a doctor who murders for his wife, and they get caught up with weird hooligans in a country house.



_____________________________


"Eat recycled food. Recycled food is good for the environment and ok for you."

(in reply to filmburner30)
Post #: 174
RE: Hammer Horror - 23/5/2011 3:19:58 PM   
Wes Moynihan

 

Posts: 7
Joined: 15/3/2010
From: Vermillion Sands, Ireland
Great review of Vampire Circus Dr Lenera. I must admit, I was underwhelmed by the film but after reading your post I may seek it out again...

One of the most impressive Hammers I've recently seen is The Damned, American blacklisted film maker Joseph Losey's one-shot gig at Hammer. The Damned is a mind-bending mash-up of apocalyptic sci-fi, fairy-tale fantasy, Government conspiracy thriller and JD's on bikes. Oliver Reed plays the head of the gang with all the swagger of a prototype Alex de Large, with some incestous designs on his sister. Dazzling stuff...

I kinda have a soft spot of Legend of the 7 Golden Vampires as well...

< Message edited by Wes Moynihan -- 23/5/2011 3:21:09 PM >


_____________________________

Check out my blog - http://plutoniumshores.blogspot.com - currently reviewing all 39 Video Nasties !

(in reply to Gkel)
Post #: 175
RE: Hammer Horror - 30/5/2011 10:49:02 AM   
Dr Lenera

 

Posts: 4038
Joined: 19/10/2005
I agree, The Damed is a fascinating and highly underrated film, thought provoking and with some great performances, even if it's not typically Hammer in approach and style! And Legend Of The 7 Golden Vampires is such fun!


_____________________________

check out more of my reviews on http://horrorcultfilms.co.uk/

(in reply to Wes Moynihan)
Post #: 176
RE: Hammer Horror - 6/6/2011 6:36:44 PM   
evil bill


Posts: 6742
Joined: 19/7/2006
From: mordor/ uk
quote:

ORIGINAL: Dr Lenera

I agree, The Damed is a fascinating and highly underrated film, thought provoking and with some great performances, even if it's not typically Hammer in approach and style! And Legend Of The 7 Golden Vampires is such fun!



Just watched Village of the Dammed over the weekend along with my old favorite Dracula film.

Brought back from his dead moldering remains with blood drooled on them by one of the bats he commands, Count Dracula once again spreads his evil from his mountaintop castle. When libertine Paul Carlson disappears one night, his more sober brother Simon and his girlfriend trace him to the area, discovering a terrified populace. Thrown out of the inn, they make their way, like Paul before them, towards the sinister castle and its undead host.
Dracula is back, bloodier and darker than usual, the shocks are more explicit,and so is the sexual activity,this is well directed by Roy Ward Baker and starring Christopher Lee in his fifth outing as Dracula.Scars Of Dracula is one of the better efforts in the Hammer Horror Dracula cycle of the 70′s,far more sadistic and erotic,with buckets of blood.We have are sexy buxom wenches,not afraid to show off there ample bosoms, who are ripe for slaughter and the guys are a mixture of village yokels and posh gentlemen. Lee as ever is at his best as the famous Vampire,both charming and carrying off his air of nastiness,in what is by far the closest version to the book by Bram Stoker,Hammer have ever released.There’s also some nice visual dark moments and memorable Gothic scenes along the way,with some good suspense,even if it’s a bit patchy at times. Blood drips onto white candles that segue into red ones and Dracula walks up walls,he impales his enemy with a burning sword,and his death in the final sequence in this film is spectacular,the inspiration and the for Jerry Dandridges fiery death sequence in Fright Night?? . While the reds and blacks in this piece of Gothic cinema art has never more been so vivid thanks to Moray Grant’s impacting photography.

The cast reads like a who’s who of British television, you got a Doctor Who,Patrick Troughton(he would star in The Omen which for me should have been a Hammer movie) , Minder,Dennis Waterman, a Bond girl and presenter of Magpie,the lovely Jenny Hanley and Lord Melbury from Fawlty Towers ,Michael Gwynn.By no means a perfect horror/Vampire movie,but if you want plenty of blood you could do worse.


_____________________________

"You listen to me now,i will find you and i will kill you!"

(in reply to Dr Lenera)
Post #: 177
RE: Hammer Horror - 15/6/2011 8:14:43 PM   
Dr Lenera

 

Posts: 4038
Joined: 19/10/2005


1794, Austria.  Following the death of his sister, Baron Joaqcum von Hartog vows to destroy the vampiric Karnstein family, and stakes them all except for Mircalla.  Several years later, General Speilsdorf is holding a birthday party and one of the guests is a Countess who has moved into a castle nearby.  She is called away to attend to a sick friend, so her supposed daughter Marcilla replaces her and stays on in the house as a guest.  Marcilla and Speilsdorf's niece Laura become the best of friends, but Laura has nightmares of a cat strangling her, keeps growing paler and weaker, and is eventually found dead with two puncture marks in her neck.  Marcilla disappears.  Nearby, Emma and her father encounter the Countess and Marcilla, though she now calls herself Carmilla, whilst out riding, and, because the Countess has to attend a sick friend, invites Carmilla to stay………


  The Vampire Lovers is probably Hammer's most enduring movie of the 70s and was such a hit that it must have seemed for a while that the company, who were struggling to keep up with the way the horror genre was going, was having a major revival.  Alas, it was not to be, though they put up a good fight with some sometimes interesting productions like Vampire Circus and Dr Jekyll And Sister Hyde.  The trouble was that they usually flopped.  The Vampire Lovers, the first film Hammer made in 1970, doesn't quite, to me, rank up there with some of their true classics and there are three or four of their films from that decade I prefer.  Still, it remains an enjoyable and quite intriguing effort, a very traditional Gothic tale spiced up with a little 'modern' permissiveness.  It was based on the1871 novella Carmilla by Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu, which had already been filmed in 1963 as Blood and Roses, and was a co-production with American International Pictures and Fantale Films, a partnership between producers Harry Fine and Micheal Styles and writer Tudor Gates.   They were sure they could get away with a vampire story with lesbianism because the 'X' certificate's minimum age restriction was about to be raised from sixteen to eighteen.  Gates' script actually stuck quite close to the novella, in which lesbianism was certainly hinted at.  As usual with Hammer, they sent the script to the censors before any filming to avoid wasted footage, and amazingly it was passed, with only a dream orgasm ending in a scream removed, though upon release the BBFC removed an opening decapitation and Mircalla kissing Emma's breasts.  The US censors the MPAA cut far more for an 'R' rating, though that didn't stop it from being a major success.

The film opens in great fashion, despite having a shot of a matted castle which this time I recognised from Scars Of Dracula!  As Douglas Wilmer's Baron von Hartog's doom-laden voice narrates what are flash-back events, we have a tremendously eerie and atmospheric shot of a shrouded, hooded figure rising out of the fog, though I think this would have been even more eerie and atmospheric without the narration.  Anyway, after another great shot of the figure moving down the busy village street and the discovery of a bitten corpse, the Baron decapitates the creature, who is revealed to be a beautiful woman who almost has the Baron under her power and nearly bites him.  Wonderful stuff, but now we move forward a decade or two [it's not specified, but when von Hartog returns near the end he's considerably older] and the film becomes quite a slowly paced Gothic tale, more a dark romance than anything else.  There's little blood or even horror except for the dreams that Laura and Emma have, effectively represented by quick black and white shots of a cat and Carmilla's teeth.  The film almost repeats itself as Carmilla does the same things in the second house she gets into  as in the first, and it's fair to say that excitement is considerably lacking.  Still, the film does just about remain engrossing, especially when Carmilla actually appears to fall in love with Emma.  After about an hour, Von Hartog returns, and the pace picks up as three guys are hunting down Carmilla. I'm sure Bram Stoker was heavily influenced by Carmilla when he wrote Dracula and nowhere is it more obvious in the final segments.   Even if you haven't seen this movie, I doubt it's much of a spoiler to tell you that Carmilla is dispatched, and this vampire isn't just staked but has her head cut off too [very unconvincingly - why did every single decapitation in Hammer films always look crap]!  I think that, as they had done with Dracula, they could have made the climax more exciting – killing off the main villain while she is asleep hardly cuts it!

The lesbianism is actually very tame by today's standards, mostly consisting of Carmilla undressing in front of various women, some kissing and cuddling, and Carmilla 'going down' on Emma off screen,  but Sapphic sexuality was still a fairly new thing in commercial cinema, with The Killing Of Sister George the year before the film that maybe opened things up.  Before that lesbianism was mostly either treated as a joke or just hinted at, and even The Vampire Lovers was unable to show Carmilla biting people on the breast, as she sometimes does.   What's interesting about Carmilla is that not only does she also use men when she needs to, she genuinely seems to fall for Emma, and has to take out her vampiric desires on other poor, unrelated victims to keep her going.  She's a really great character, is Carmilla, sometimes scary, presenting a gloriously inhibited sexuality [her clothes just won't stay on], but at times somewhat sad.  There's one touching bit where she sees a funeral carriage pass by, shudders and says forlornly to Emma,  "you must die, everybody must die”.   On a lighter note, there's also a wonderful pub scene, of the kind you've seen in a hundred similar films, where a man mentions the word "vampire” in saying the vampire is a myth.  Suddenly the music, laughter and chatter stops and the land lord says in his best doom laden manner, "not round here it isn't, Mr Renton”.  The scene loses a point for the landlord not being Michael Ripper though.  The Vampire Lovers generally looks good, with the usual fine eye for period detail on a small budget, though you can see tennis courts in the background of one scene, and the actual script suffers from having a few too many characters, in particular a pointless, Dracula-like 'Man In Black' [played by John Forbes-Robertson, who would later play Dracula in The Legend Of The 7 Golden Vampires] , who just seems to follow Carmilla around on a horse and sometimes look menacing.  This character was originally supposed to disintegrate but AIP wanted him to survive to pave the way for a possible sequel.

Despite pacing problems which are more as a result of the overstuffed, talky script, director Roy Ward Baker proves himself totally at home with Gothic horror.  His horror films of the 70s tend to be neglected in favour of his earlier films like A Night To Remember but they have a vibrancy and use of colour that at times almost approximates the great Terence Fisher.  Ingrid Pitt is fantastic as Carmilla, in a role that Shirley Eaton was considered for.  She's not much of an actress but has a hypnotic presence and striking carnality in every scene, even when she's not doing anything.  Hammer surrounded her and the other nubile young women [who include Kate O'Mara, Pippa Steel and Madeline Smith], with a strong array of older actors such as Peter Cushing  [in what is almost a cameo], Douglas Wilmer and George Cole, and Jon Finch is a stronger young male lead than normal, though his character doesn't really need to be in the film.  Harry Robinson provides a lush, rich score, emphasising dark beauty over intense horror, though this critic's ears this time noted a few bars from the score to Taste The Blood Of Dracula shoehorned in during one scene and a waltz that had previously been used in The Curse Of Frankenstein.  I don't think that The Vampire Lovers is quite as good a film as its' fame and reputation; I remember the first time I saw it I found it a little dull and said to myself "is that it?” afterwards.  It does grow on you though, has plenty of interesting things in it, and stands as a fascinating footnote in the history of horror cinema, where, as it was dying a slow and painful death, the old fashioned, Gothic horror film tried to fight back against the more relevant, modern and frightening new wave of scary movies that was replacing it in cinemas during the 70s.
6.5/10

< Message edited by Dr Lenera -- 30/6/2011 12:09:31 PM >


_____________________________

check out more of my reviews on http://horrorcultfilms.co.uk/

(in reply to evil bill)
Post #: 178
RE: Hammer Horror - 15/6/2011 8:18:04 PM   
Dr Lenera

 

Posts: 4038
Joined: 19/10/2005
 

1830, forty years after the last manifestation of the vampiric Karnstein family.  A young woman is captured and taken to the Karnstein castle, where Count Karnstein and two aides are waiting to revive Carmilla.  The girl's throat is slit and her dripping blood revives the beautiful vampire.  Meanwhile a writer called Richard LeStrange has come to the village to do some research for his latest horror novel.  Upon exploring the castle, he is startled by some hooded, cloaked figures who are actually students at the finishing school nearby.  When he sees a new arrival at the school, calling herself Mircalla, he impersonates another teacher so he can stay there, but in the village, a dead girl is found with bites on her neck………..  


It's probably obvious by now that I'm a big fan of Hammer horror, but I'll certainly admit there were some films which missed the mark, especially during the 70s, where the studio basically a died a slow, painful death.  Lust For A Vampire is often mentioned as one of their worst, and it isn't especially good, though I think there are elements of a interesting film in there.  It's just that they are sunk by laziness and, at times, simple ineptitude.  It also borders on being boring at times, and that is not a word I like to use when describing a film.  It was a one of several co-productions between Hammer and EMI, and it's undoubtedly odd that AIP, who had helped make the commercially successful The Vampire Lovers, passed on a sequel.  Tudor Gates' script was originally called To Love A Vampire, and at first had several references to The Vampire Lovers, but for some reason most of these ended up being deleted from the script.  Ingrid Pitt, who of course had made such a great impression in The Vampire Lovers, turned the film down because she thought the script was terrible [she was at least 75% right].  The film had a troubled production, including director Terence Fisher having a car accident and having to be replaced at short notice by Jummy Sangster, and Peter Cushing having to drop out because his wife was ill [sadly she died soon after].  His role, that of schoolmaster Giles Barton, was filled in by Ralph Bates.  One sequence where Carmilla seduces and feeds on a schoolgirl called Judy was drastically shortened from the script version at the instruction of the BBFC, and the same scene lost a few seconds of nudity when the film was released though it was restored many years later.  Lust For A Vampire was a flop, though it wasn't helped that the studio disliked the film and had little faith in it, resulting it having a limited release especially in the US, where the sex was predictably toned down considerably.

The film certainly opens well, with Carmilla's bloody revival staged like a black mass and heavily reminiscent of Dracula's unforgettable resurrection in Dracula Prince Of Darkness while being just about different enough to stand out on its' own.  We are treated to some unrealistic but rather interesting shots of the blood seeping around Carmilla's bones and a body forming, then a creepy shot of the totally shrouded Carmilla jerking to life under the sheet.  We then switch to our 'hero' Richard LeStrange, and he's introduced as a boozy skirt-chaser who isn't especially likeable but is  certainly more interesting than many of Hammer's other dull young male characters.  When we arrive at the school though, it's fair to say that the pace drags to a halt and remains incredibly slow.  Now a slow moving horror film can be great, in fact there are probably more great horror films that are slow moving then there are fast, but Lust For A Vampire has little suspense, atmosphere or even horror, and therefore just sits there not really doing anything while the script wastes times on stuff like the search for a missing body.  The potentially interesting romantic aspect dominating the story just doesn't work, being sunk by awful scripting [though I'd take this movie over all the entire Twilight series any day].  The first time Richard is alone with Carmilla, he tells her he loves her despite hardly knowing her, then the second time,  after he has found out she's a vampire, he says "prove to me that you're not”,  assuming she'll have sex with him despite her having shown no feelings for him whatsoever either of the romantic or the carnal variety.  Then of course, she does have sex with him immediately!  Little then really happens until the climax, where torch bearing villagers head for Karnstein castle and at last we get some gore with some nicely gruesome stakings and a rather good downbeat final scene.

I've made much of this movie sound awful, but for the patient there are pleasures to be had, especially if you're male [or lesbian!].  There are less scenes of Sapphic groping then in The Vampire Lovers, but the few there are are slightly more explicit, and have an air of casual eroticism, such as when one girl starts to massage Carmilla's neck, Carmilla's top falls off seemingly naturally, and the girl kisses her on the neck in what looks like a gentle variation of the way Carmilla normally bites her victims.  Unfortunately the sex scene between Richard and Carmilla is laughably staged, reveals Hammer's often obvious sexism by having Carmilla naked but Richard fully clothed, and has a rather sweet but ridiculously out of place song called 'Strange Love' played over it.  Gates' script is incredibly poor narrative-wise, and totally ignores traditional lore with vampires walking about in daylight and not being harmed by fire, but bizarrely does pepper the film with far more rounded characters then was usual for Hammer.  Aside from Carmilla, who this time seems more unfeeling and evil, we have our flawed hero Richard, who becomes more and more sympathetic as the film goes on as he genuinely falls in love, can't really deal with it and drowns his pain in more and more drink.  There's Janet Playfare [who sounds like a Bond girl!], the outwardly cold school girl who inside is passionately in love with Richard, and schoolmaster Giles Barton, who on the surface is a typical repressed schoolmaster most happy amidst the dust of old books, but has a secret interest in witchcraft and possibly sexual desires.  Even minor characters like a police inspector are well sketched out, it's just that they all belong in a better film.  The slightly enhanced role for the Man In Black doesn't work though because the film keeps throwing in shots of Christopher Lee's eyes in Scars Of Dracula!

Director Jimmy Sangster was mainly a writer for Hammer responsible for writing many of their early classics, but his three directorial efforts for Hammer show only moderate skill in that area. With the exception of a dream scene shot through various coloured filters  [actually an especially pointless scene consisting of earlier shots in the movie], he directs this movie with little interest.  Yutte Stensgaard as Carmilla doesn't even come up to Ingrid Pitt in acting ability, but she still has a presence and does effectively display a callous evilness.  Ralph Bates, who said that the film was tasteless and that he regretted having anything to do with it, gives probably his best performance for Hammer as Giles, hinting at repressed desires but also being rather funny [just look at the way he runs], but Micheal Johnson is not good enough an actor to show Richard's emotional journey convincingly and is sometimes unintentionally funny in his expressions.  Likewise Micheal Raven doesn't have a strong enough presence as the Man in Black, now renamed Count Karnstein.  I must mention Harry Robinson's fantastic score, which seems to have been written for a very good film indeed.  He employs a variety of musical instruments and styles from 18th century harpsichord music to choral hymns, really gets into the emotional heart of the story and provides a beautiful love theme which certainly didn't need a song played over it!  I've tried to be positive about Lust For A Vampire for probably more of this review than the film deserves, because it is a poor effort, there's no getting away from that.  There are interesting elements though, so maybe this is one film Hammer [who of course have started making films again] could successfully remake!
4/10

< Message edited by Dr Lenera -- 30/6/2011 12:15:07 PM >


_____________________________

check out more of my reviews on http://horrorcultfilms.co.uk/

(in reply to Dr Lenera)
Post #: 179
RE: Hammer Horror - 15/6/2011 8:20:37 PM   
Dr Lenera

 

Posts: 4038
Joined: 19/10/2005


Karnstein village and the surrounding area are being terrorised by a group of witch hunters called the Brotherhood, whose zealous, puritanical leader Gustav Weil seems to need little reason to burn women at the stake.   After they have harassed the rakish Count Karnstein, who is protected by the Emperor, the Count swears revenge.  During a black magic ceremony, the evil Carmilla’s ghost is accidently summoned and turns Karnstein into a vampire.  Meanwhile Gustav’s recently orphaned nieces, identical twins Frieda and Maria Gellborn, arrive in Karnstein.  Maria is a prim virtuous girl, but Frieda is wild and cruel and sneaks off one night to Karnstein castle………..



  Twins Of Evil, the last film in the Hammer Karnstein trilogy, is, despite only having Carmilla [the main villain in The Vampire Lovers and Lust For A Vampire] in one scene, the best of the three movies.  It’s a tightly plotted tragedy with very strong characters that would have actually worked just as well without the vampire part of the plot, and it’s intelligent script certainly doesn’t seem like the work of the same guy who wrote Lust For A Vampire!  It was originally intended to be called The Vampire Virgins and was to star Peter Cushing, in his comeback role for Hammer after spending two months grieving over the death of his wife, as the vengeful Count Karnstein spreading terror through the village.  Of course it was also to feature the return of Carmilla.  This script was rejected, possibly due to the commercial failure of Lust For A Vampire, so Tudor Gates reworked it, all but removed Carmilla from the story and added a character who was perhaps even more of a villain than Karnstein, that of cruel witchfinder Gustav Weil.  Supported by Rank, Hammer decided to use John Hough, a relative newcomer, to direct.  He filled the cast list with alumni from his TV movie Wolfshead:The Legend Of Robin Hood, though of course most of the publicity concerned the twin ladies who were starring!  Released in the UK on a double bill above Hands Of The Ripper, the film did fair business but didn’t really halt Hammer’s declining fortunes.  The film suffered only a couple of fleeting trims in the UK, but in the US, the film was cut by almost three minutes, removing most of the gore and sex, though considering there wasn’t actually much sex anyway in this one, the MPAA must have just been in a fussy mood.

Twins Of Evil begins with the Brotherhood burning a woman as a witch, and it’s a nicely different opening, though automatically one thinks of Witchfinder General!  Soon we have the revival of Carmilla, and, out of all the effective, creepy shots of the shrouded, hooded vampire shuffling about you get in these films, this one has the best, as she almost glides around the main hall of the castle.  Unfortunately, she’s not in the film after this, and I really think it was pointless putting her in-yes I know it was to connect more with the previous two movies, but they still could have done without her.  I assumed from the other films that Count Karnstein was a vampire anyway, you’re certainly led to believe that, so they could have totally done away with the Carmilla scene.   Twins Of Evil moves at a slightly faster lick than it’s predeccessors and has considerably more going on in it’s plot, though it’s fair to say that the aspect of the story concerning Weil and the Brotherhood is actually more interesting than the vampire stuff.  Most of the violence, even the vampire biting, occurs mostly off screen until the last twenty minutes, where for once we are given an exciting final reel with lots of rushing about and tons of brutality with a machete in the face, a torch in the eyes, an axe in the back and even a reasonably convincing decapitation!  Because the film has made some attempt to build up its’ characters and their relationships, there is actually a genuine sense of tragedy towards the end, though the staging is a little rushed and clumsy.  Still, there’s more action in this final section than in probably the first two films put together.

The script for this one really is good, it takes the idea of repression versus libertarianism, a common Hammer subject, and runs with it.  It also refuses to take sides- yes, Karnstein might be a degenerate who murders and practices black magic, but at least he tries to enjoy himself, unlike the Puritanical Brotherhood.  Weil is a really interesting character-he’s single minded and misguided but at least he practises what he preaches and really believes he is doing the right thing.  “I’ve always tried….to be a good man” he says wearily to his wife during one effective little moment.  All the characters in the film are painted in shades of grey, as opposed to white, even the nominal young ‘hero, with one exception-Maria [a common name for Hammer heroines].  She’s extremely ‘good’, and honest and virtuous, but you want to slap her when she takes beatings intended for her sister and generally let’s herself be controlled by her.  Now I’ve praised this effort quite a bit so far, but, as with all the later Hammer entries, there are things which let it down.  Once again the ‘rules’ of vampirism are changed- for example, one can now be bitten by a vampire once, and become a vampire straight away.  The sets [which were reused for Vampire Circus] look especially cardboard this time, with little attempt to disguise this, while little effort seems to been made to create the atmosphere which played such a big part in shaping the Hammer classics of the 50s and 60s.  Of course the favourite wood location of Black Park makes an appearance, but it wouldn’t matter so much if Hammer didn’t keep shooting in the exact same areas each film!

Cushing is simply superb in this movie, it’s his coldest, harchest characterisation yet for Hammer, but one always senses that Wiel believes entirely in the correctness of his actions, and that he once had humanity but it’s almost all been stripped away by his obsessive desire to supposedly purge the world of witches.  As I’ve mentioned before this was his first role after the death of his wife, and this traumatic event appeared to change his appearance, giving him a very gaunt, pained look.  Compare to how looks here to how he is in The Vampire Lovers just a year before, and the difference is striking, not to mention extremely sad.  He threw himself into his work for the rest of the decade, averaging five or six films a year.  With Cushing at his very best none of the rest of the cast have a chance, but Damien Thomas is by far the best of the three incarnations of Count Karnstein, at times giving off a cruel charisma that might go some to way to explaining why women fall at his feet, and David Warbeck, in the first of several memorable cult movie roles, is a very likeable romantic interest for the twins.  They are played reasonably well by Madeleine and Mary Collinson.  The score this time is by Harry Williamson, another occasional composer for Hammer, and it’s a rather more conventional Hammer ‘blood and thunder’ score.  Though good in places, the music sounds very tinny and Williamson certainly didn’t have the knack that James Bernard  [the main composer for the studio] had, of being able to make a small orchestra sound like a big one!   If Twins Of Evil had been made, say, ten years before, by the original Hammer team in their original shooting place Bray Studios, with for example Terence Fisher directing, Christopher Lee as Karnstein, Jack Asher photographing, James Bernard doing the music, etc, I have little doubt that it would be a true Hammer masterpiece to go alongside films like Dracula and The Devil Rides Out. The trouble is, it wasn’t, and that’s a shame, because the ingredients are there, and it remains a highlight of the studio’s later years.
7/10



_____________________________

check out more of my reviews on http://horrorcultfilms.co.uk/

(in reply to Dr Lenera)
Post #: 180
Page:   <<   < prev  4 5 [6] 7 8   next >   >>
All Forums >> [Film Forums] >> Golden Oldies >> RE: Hammer Horror Page: <<   < prev  4 5 [6] 7 8   next >   >>
Jump to:





New Messages No New Messages
Hot Topic w/ New Messages Hot Topic w/o New Messages
Locked w/ New Messages Locked w/o New Messages
 Post New Thread
 Reply to Message
 Post New Poll
 Submit Vote
 Delete My Own Post
 Delete My Own Thread
 Rate Posts


 
Movie News  |  Empire Blog  |  Movie Reviews  |  Future Films  |  Features  |  Video Interviews  |  Image Gallery  |  Competitions  |  Forum  |  Magazine  |  Resources
 
Forum Software © ASPPlayground.NET Advanced Edition 2.4.5 ANSI

0.172