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RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 31/8/2013 9:09:11 PM   
Whistler


Posts: 3124
Joined: 22/11/2006
Yeah I'm hoping to catch You're Next within the next few days. To be honest I didn't think the trailer was that great, but the strong reviews have made me excited. I doubt it will top The Conjuring (for me anyway), but I'm really looking forward to it.

(in reply to paul.mccluskey)
Post #: 15121
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 1/9/2013 12:25:43 AM   
Platter

 

Posts: 113
Joined: 14/8/2010
House of Wax (2004) 4 out of 10
For a slasher it was okay. It was a bit boring in places and it wasn't scary. Also the kills weren't that good. It was serviceable enough with a few creepy images. The ending with the melting house was odd and surreal with some vividly peculiar images. Not bad but still below average. Paris Hilton's death scene was the best part of the movie with a bit of the brutal more reminiscent of the Final Destination films.



Oblivion (2013) 8
It's been heavily criticised as just being a compilation of other sci-fi movie ideas stitched together. That's harsh and unfair. Perhaps it has no original ideas of its own, but it artfully puts the ideas together with a different visual look (the Icelandic landscape and the clean luxury plastic and glass technology) to become something solid and with a personality of its own. I didn't predict much of what happened in the movie. It was a very strong film that I thought was in the 9 out of 10 region. Then the weak ending took place. It was unimaginative (strongly recalls the worst part of Independence Day) and silly. It knocked the film down to 8 out of 10. I thought the pacing was good and brisk and the visuals impressive. I really enjoyed the movie. It might not be very original, but what is?



Drive (2011) 7
Style over substance, but the style isn't that impressive. The visuals and the music are nice but they don't knock me out. For such a director controlled movie I felt it was filmed in a strangely anonymous way - the director didn't stamp that much personality on it. The story is very straightforward and well paced with a few slower moments, but I had no issues at all with the speed of the storytelling. It's a good movie but it's nothing remarkable.



The Brood (1979) 6
It's a rather clunky and silly story with mildly depressing subject matter. The few murders are poorly and unconvincingly staged. There are a few questions of logic, or more specifically characters under reacting to events. The ending is weak as the baddie is very easily killed. Visually there are echoes of The Shining in the camera work and in the late 70s architecture and decor (bright yellow doors in the police station). Perhaps the same wide lenses were used that give the two films their similar chunky look as the camera moves through the spaces. The movie doesn't quite hold together very convincingly but it works just about. It's very much a cult film that would probably still be well remembered even if the director wasn't so notable.



Psycho (1960) 10
Great ideas written and directed with assured, confident clarity. The film hasn't dated much beyond the restraint of censorship - the killings could all do with a bit more blood and guts. The acting wasn't overly mannered, with maybe only a few lapses such as the cop. The famous shower scene is good, but now with blood drenched slashers and MTV editing it looks very standard and pedestrian. It's easy to imagine the impact it would have had, but it can't still have that shock to it after more than fifty years. The buying the used car and the cleaning up after the shower murder are two dead spots in the movie that could have been tightened. Beyond a few niggles there is almost nothing that could be changed to make it significantly better. A lot of people hate the final scene with the psychiatrist explaining everything. I like that scene and I'm glad it's there. I don't think he over explains things, and I like having the film maker lay it out solidly without expecting the audience to fill in all the blanks for themselves. A great movie. A proper classic.



Hitchcock (2012) 7
As a film buff I found it very interesting, but I'm not convinced there was much of a story there. Nothing really happens beyond they made a classic film (Psycho) that a lot of people had doubts about. It's not the most dramatic story ever told. They tried to make a story out of the Hitchcocks marriage, but again I'm not convinced there was any story worth telling there. I enjoyed it as the subject matter interests me, it was well made and the acting was very good. I just doubt if a non-film buff would care about any of it. All I can say is, it worked for me.



Lady in the Water (2006) 8
I was expecting it to be bad but I really enjoyed it. My inclination to like it may have been heavily influenced by reading the book The Man Who Heard Voices about the making of this film. I took to it quickly and I think it worked. The fairy tale elements are hard to swallow but if you think of it as surrealism it works well enough. Some of the rules are arbitrary and silly, but it mostly hangs together. I hate made up words so I would have preferred if he just used 'sea nymph' instead of 'nerf', 'giant eagle' instead of whatever he used. Made up names pop you out the film and just make you think how silly all this made up stuff is. I disliked the five minute section when the male lead has to go into the pool to find medicine for the girl - it felt like a contrived, stupid section that added nothing to the story. The critic gets a funny death scene (although the character feels like a petty joke by the writer). The casting of Shyamalan himself as the important writer worked okay in my opinion, but it did give his critics a lot of ammunition about his ego. The deliberate jokes often fell flat but the ideas were laugh out loud funny (I mean that in a good way). The assigning of roles and then switching later on was all very funny and clever. The various decoders of signs were funny. I laughed quite a lot. The acting was good, which was unexpected as I dislike his work with actors in general. I'm often aware of him directing every word and expression to the point were he drives out all naturalism and makes his actors look and sound like they are in a terrible play (everyone in The Happening was forced to give awful performances for example). The lead actress was given a boring character who never smiles or gets to crack a joke, so she is a weak, unappealing centre to the whole film. I honestly enjoyed the movie quite a lot. The fairy tale elements worked. I highly recommend the book about the making of the film.



Brake (2011) 10
I had zero expectations for this man in a box film. The packaging screamed third rate, straight to rental, B-movie knock off. It was way, way, way better than I could have hoped for. As far as one actor on screen in an enclosed location movies go, this is a masterpiece, and a lot better than Buried (2010). Dorff gave a performance that held my attention, with the extensive voice cast all being good as well. It was visually interesting throughout and the script was taut and eventful with plenty happening. I'm not saying it's a great movie, but considering its built in limitations it's about as good as it could be. This must be the pinnacle of the sub-genre. I can't imagine there being a better version of this type of story. The ending seemed a bit disappointing with a weak twist, but it then came up with an extra kick (predictable enough, but well played) that saved it from being a poor climax. I highly enjoyed this movie.



Ben Wheatley reviews:

Down Terrace (2009) 4
It's a slight idea (a gangster film as a domestic soap) and it's over extended at feature length. The first half is okay, but when the killings start I didn't buy into it as much as I should have. It was too casual. That might be realistic but as a film viewer I don't believe murder can be that sloppy and untroubling to the killers. I also struggled with the fact that a character gets knifed multiple times in the torso and yet doesn't seek medical attention and seems to walk away fine with only some blood stains on his clothes. I didn't accept the ending - both how casual and the deaths were and who did them and why. There are signs of it not quite holding together dramatically all the way to the end. The director has a problem with coming up with endings that people agree with as his later movies also show. It was okay, neither good or bad, 5 out of 10 stuff until the last half hour which didn't work as well. It's curious that his next film continued with this deliberately low-key domestic gangster style. The camera work was slightly annoying in that it was the clichéd hand held documentary look that was mostly filmed in close ups and medium shots. There are very few wide shots, which adds a claustrophobia to the film which is more visually boring than psychologically immersive. It held my attention at least despite the small scale of it just being mostly a few characters talking in the one house.



Kill List (2011) 6
It's deliberately banal in a soap style domestic rows sort of way. Just because it's deliberate doesn't stop it from actually being a bit banal. I knew going in that it has a weird ending that comes out of nowhere so I was primed for that. I'm surprised people are surprised by the ending. Even without knowing in advance there are plenty of hints that things are going to get weird. There are lots of odd moments (signing a contract in blood) and lots of occult references (the woman the Irish hit man is dating is clearly a witch of some sort). The Hammer horror ending does not come out of nowhere. It's very clearly sign posted. An attentive viewer should know things are going to get occult by the end. For me the ending isn't random, it is of a piece of what has gone before. For me the problem is: there is no explanation at the end for the events that have gone before. It makes the whole film feel like a shapeless string of scenes with little connection tying it all together (Full Metal Jacket style). Why were they hired to kill those people? Why did they say thank you when they were being killed? Why does it end with him being tricked into killing those people? Maybe there is a reason, or maybe it's so ambiguous the makers have no answers? There is a lack of an overall point. I'm just not convinced the first third has much to do with the second third and so on. The various parts of the movie seemed too disconnected from each other. I liked the film but it was no masterpiece.



Sightseers (2012) 4
I didn't like the lead characters. They were annoying as they struggled to communicate. I find characters who can't seem to talk with clarity to each other to be irritating. Apparently the lead actors-writers had been playing these people on stage for about a year, but I didn't pick up much actual character from them. They were blank and devoid of any particular life or quirk. The whole tone of the film stems directly from them, so I found the whole movie to be kind of annoying. It's incident packed but its the usual parochial banality of everyday domestic English life that dominates the film, like it does the directors two previous movies. It's a preoccupation the director has that I can't say I share. The kills aren't well filmed (the attack on the author in the early morning being particularly poor). There are a few laughs in the movie. The ending is quite good and amusing. It was very watchable but I can't say I cared much for it.



A Field in England (2013) 5
[This is an older review I've already posted]
After I got past the ropey and unappealing first ten minutes it became okay. I eventually bought into it and the plot was developing at a decent pace. When they start digging the plot grinds to a halt as they run out of story. So they resort to a lot of time wasting meandering. Then the climax is just a lot of weird, psychedelic, quickly edited abstract nonsense in the place of much actual content. I imagine the script could have simply read, 'Ten minutes of random, weirdly edited images that don't mean much.' The ending is not outright bad as it's watchable and not tiresome, but it's still not much of a climax to reduce everything to someone farting around in the editing room with experimental cutting. What is here is quite good, and there are a few flashes of wit and insight in some of the dialogue, but they gave up on telling a coherent story all the way up to the last third. It's not a great film but I think it will be as well remembered, and perhaps even as critically admired, as The Witchfinder General and The Wicker Man in the years to come - if for no other reason than there aren't a lot of other movies like these. It also reminded me of The Seventh Seal (1957). The black and white cinematography was annoying as the blacks were so deep that they sucked up all visual information and became black holes without any detail.

< Message edited by Platter -- 1/9/2013 12:27:31 AM >


_____________________________

My novel:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/This-Cuckoo-Island-ebook/dp/B00EIP4ZVS/ref=sr_1_4?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1377097535&sr=1-4

(in reply to paul.mccluskey)
Post #: 15122
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 1/9/2013 10:21:54 AM   
Whistler


Posts: 3124
Joined: 22/11/2006


Directors: Nat Faxon, Jim Rash
Cast: Steve Carell, Sam Rockwell, Toni Collette, Allison Janney, Liam James, Maya Rudolf, AnnSophia Robb, Rob Corddry, Amanda Peet
Running time: 103 minutes
Certification: 12A

While spending the summer away from home, socially awkward teenager Duncan (James) struggles to fit in anywhere. Growing fed-up with his demeaning new dad (Carell), his wicked half-sister, his increasingly distant mother (Collette) and all of their laissezfaire friends, he finds welcome at a nearby water park where he befriends one of the staff members, the free-spirited, father-like figure Owen (Rockwell).

I’m a bit of a sucker for touching indie comedy dramas. The Descendants (written by our Way, Way Back writer/directors Nat Faxon and Jim Rash) was one of my favourite films of 2011. Stuck In Love., from earlier this year, is one of my favourite films of this year, and Little Miss Sunshine is one of my favourite films of all time. There’s a pattern there, clearly. It’s a genre I just warm to. Something about their simplicity and down-to-earth nature, the telling of real stories and real characters in real settings provides such satisfying arcs, and it’s something I aspire to as a writer.

The Way, Way Back brings us into the world of Duncan, a shy, awkward, slightly oppressed young boy struggling to find happiness with his new family, played wonderfully by the young actor Liam James with the perfect mix of awkward but cool, totally sympathetic and completely lovable. His mother’s new boyfriend, Trent, is a jerk – played marvelously against type by an unusually bearded and ripped Steve Carell – who masquerades as a character-building type who’s trying to improve Duncan, but in reality just berates and puts him down at every turn, and whom Duncan knows is always trying to embarrass him. We open with the scene that opened all the trailers: Trent asking Duncan what he rates himself out of ten, before offering a rating himself; an insulting, spirit-destroying three. If you want to know how to set-up a character quickly without any fuss, look no further than here. Within one minute of the film starting, Trent is one of the biggest assholes we’ve ever known, and Duncan is one of the most sympathetic protagonists.

The vehement attributes of their relationship being cemented so early on is essential in building the future relationship between Duncan and Owen, as it acts as a sort of catalytic bridge to everything Duncan is looking for in not just a father, but a friend. Sam Rockwell is fantastic. Really fantastic. He’s impressed me in everything he’s done and sure enough it’s no different here. He brings such energy and charisma to every frame, filling the audience with the same sense of inspiration and awe that Duncan so clearly feels. Being the two standout performances of the film, the scenes with he and Duncan together sparkle and shine.

Rash and Faxon’s film taps into the often tremulous and arduous trials of childhood expertly. It brings to fruition that feeling that you don’t fit it, that you can’t speak your mind, that everyone’s laughing at you, and plays on the smallest childhood embarrassments like having to wear a bulky, stupid-looking life jacket when no-one else done. I imagine we’ve all felt similar at one point or another. It even plays on the excruciating awkwardness that seems so defectively inherent with board games, using it as a device to break down the relationships once and for all. They’re supposed to be harmless fun for the family, and often they are, but we’ve all experienced the awkward heat when playing with the wrong people. There’s distinctly nothing less fun than that very moment.

What ultimately wins us over in The Way, Way Back is its believability. We don’t just watch Duncan’s frustration, we feel it, like Pacino in Serpico when he smashes up the office, and at times it’s excruciating. Furthermore, we don’t simply witness the bond forming between Duncan and Owen, but we almost feel a part of it – explicitly because we were instantly so connected and sympathetic towards Duncan, and won over by Owen’s guardian-like charm. Credit to the marvelous writing, bringing us characters we know and care about (or don’t care about in Trent and his daughter’s case) and delivering a story that plays so skillfully, and at times, reverently, on the childhood experience.

This is a really touching, funny and emotive little drama that wins us over in one minute and doesn’t stop for the next hundred. Leaving us completely and totally satisfied without feeling the need to wrap things up in too perfect a bundle, The Way, Way Back is an often surprising, wonderfully inspiring and really quite beautiful film.

(in reply to Platter)
Post #: 15123
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 1/9/2013 8:55:33 PM   
Dr Lenera

 

Posts: 3980
Joined: 19/10/2005

quote:

ORIGINAL: Whistler

Yeah I'm hoping to catch You're Next within the next few days. To be honest I didn't think the trailer was that great, but the strong reviews have made me excited. I doubt it will top The Conjuring (for me anyway), but I'm really looking forward to it.


I would say don't bother. I HATED You're Next. I mean, the first 20 mins was good, fine suspenseful build-up, then the kid with Parkinson's disease took over the camera and it became virtually unwatchable for me. Most of the time the director didn't even show you the kills properly. Awful, and it gave me another fucking headache too. I've seen better filmmaking in your average Friday The 13th movie. I'm sure there are good aspects about it, but I lost interest half an hour in, stopped caring, and almost walked out. I'm not doing a review [DJ on our website gave it 1 out of 10!], because once again I'll end up too annoyed doing it. Not for the first time this year, I'm seriously worried about cinema. 3.5/10 at the most.

_____________________________

check out more of my reviews on http://horrorcultfilms.co.uk/

(in reply to Whistler)
Post #: 15124
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 1/9/2013 8:58:28 PM   
Dr Lenera

 

Posts: 3980
Joined: 19/10/2005
quote:

ORIGINAL: Platter

House of Wax (2004) 4 out of 10
For a slasher it was okay. It was a bit boring in places and it wasn't scary. Also the kills weren't that good. It was serviceable enough with a few creepy images. The ending with the melting house was odd and surreal with some vividly peculiar images. Not bad but still below average. Paris Hilton's death scene was the best part of the movie with a bit of the brutal more reminiscent of the Final Destination films.



Oblivion (2013) 8
It's been heavily criticised as just being a compilation of other sci-fi movie ideas stitched together. That's harsh and unfair. Perhaps it has no original ideas of its own, but it artfully puts the ideas together with a different visual look (the Icelandic landscape and the clean luxury plastic and glass technology) to become something solid and with a personality of its own. I didn't predict much of what happened in the movie. It was a very strong film that I thought was in the 9 out of 10 region. Then the weak ending took place. It was unimaginative (strongly recalls the worst part of Independence Day) and silly. It knocked the film down to 8 out of 10. I thought the pacing was good and brisk and the visuals impressive. I really enjoyed the movie. It might not be very original, but what is?



Drive (2011) 7
Style over substance, but the style isn't that impressive. The visuals and the music are nice but they don't knock me out. For such a director controlled movie I felt it was filmed in a strangely anonymous way - the director didn't stamp that much personality on it. The story is very straightforward and well paced with a few slower moments, but I had no issues at all with the speed of the storytelling. It's a good movie but it's nothing remarkable.



The Brood (1979) 6
It's a rather clunky and silly story with mildly depressing subject matter. The few murders are poorly and unconvincingly staged. There are a few questions of logic, or more specifically characters under reacting to events. The ending is weak as the baddie is very easily killed. Visually there are echoes of The Shining in the camera work and in the late 70s architecture and decor (bright yellow doors in the police station). Perhaps the same wide lenses were used that give the two films their similar chunky look as the camera moves through the spaces. The movie doesn't quite hold together very convincingly but it works just about. It's very much a cult film that would probably still be well remembered even if the director wasn't so notable.



Psycho (1960) 10
Great ideas written and directed with assured, confident clarity. The film hasn't dated much beyond the restraint of censorship - the killings could all do with a bit more blood and guts. The acting wasn't overly mannered, with maybe only a few lapses such as the cop. The famous shower scene is good, but now with blood drenched slashers and MTV editing it looks very standard and pedestrian. It's easy to imagine the impact it would have had, but it can't still have that shock to it after more than fifty years. The buying the used car and the cleaning up after the shower murder are two dead spots in the movie that could have been tightened. Beyond a few niggles there is almost nothing that could be changed to make it significantly better. A lot of people hate the final scene with the psychiatrist explaining everything. I like that scene and I'm glad it's there. I don't think he over explains things, and I like having the film maker lay it out solidly without expecting the audience to fill in all the blanks for themselves. A great movie. A proper classic.



Hitchcock (2012) 7
As a film buff I found it very interesting, but I'm not convinced there was much of a story there. Nothing really happens beyond they made a classic film (Psycho) that a lot of people had doubts about. It's not the most dramatic story ever told. They tried to make a story out of the Hitchcocks marriage, but again I'm not convinced there was any story worth telling there. I enjoyed it as the subject matter interests me, it was well made and the acting was very good. I just doubt if a non-film buff would care about any of it. All I can say is, it worked for me.



Lady in the Water (2006) 8
I was expecting it to be bad but I really enjoyed it. My inclination to like it may have been heavily influenced by reading the book The Man Who Heard Voices about the making of this film. I took to it quickly and I think it worked. The fairy tale elements are hard to swallow but if you think of it as surrealism it works well enough. Some of the rules are arbitrary and silly, but it mostly hangs together. I hate made up words so I would have preferred if he just used 'sea nymph' instead of 'nerf', 'giant eagle' instead of whatever he used. Made up names pop you out the film and just make you think how silly all this made up stuff is. I disliked the five minute section when the male lead has to go into the pool to find medicine for the girl - it felt like a contrived, stupid section that added nothing to the story. The critic gets a funny death scene (although the character feels like a petty joke by the writer). The casting of Shyamalan himself as the important writer worked okay in my opinion, but it did give his critics a lot of ammunition about his ego. The deliberate jokes often fell flat but the ideas were laugh out loud funny (I mean that in a good way). The assigning of roles and then switching later on was all very funny and clever. The various decoders of signs were funny. I laughed quite a lot. The acting was good, which was unexpected as I dislike his work with actors in general. I'm often aware of him directing every word and expression to the point were he drives out all naturalism and makes his actors look and sound like they are in a terrible play (everyone in The Happening was forced to give awful performances for example). The lead actress was given a boring character who never smiles or gets to crack a joke, so she is a weak, unappealing centre to the whole film. I honestly enjoyed the movie quite a lot. The fairy tale elements worked. I highly recommend the book about the making of the film.



Brake (2011) 10
I had zero expectations for this man in a box film. The packaging screamed third rate, straight to rental, B-movie knock off. It was way, way, way better than I could have hoped for. As far as one actor on screen in an enclosed location movies go, this is a masterpiece, and a lot better than Buried (2010). Dorff gave a performance that held my attention, with the extensive voice cast all being good as well. It was visually interesting throughout and the script was taut and eventful with plenty happening. I'm not saying it's a great movie, but considering its built in limitations it's about as good as it could be. This must be the pinnacle of the sub-genre. I can't imagine there being a better version of this type of story. The ending seemed a bit disappointing with a weak twist, but it then came up with an extra kick (predictable enough, but well played) that saved it from being a poor climax. I highly enjoyed this movie.



Ben Wheatley reviews:

Down Terrace (2009) 4
It's a slight idea (a gangster film as a domestic soap) and it's over extended at feature length. The first half is okay, but when the killings start I didn't buy into it as much as I should have. It was too casual. That might be realistic but as a film viewer I don't believe murder can be that sloppy and untroubling to the killers. I also struggled with the fact that a character gets knifed multiple times in the torso and yet doesn't seek medical attention and seems to walk away fine with only some blood stains on his clothes. I didn't accept the ending - both how casual and the deaths were and who did them and why. There are signs of it not quite holding together dramatically all the way to the end. The director has a problem with coming up with endings that people agree with as his later movies also show. It was okay, neither good or bad, 5 out of 10 stuff until the last half hour which didn't work as well. It's curious that his next film continued with this deliberately low-key domestic gangster style. The camera work was slightly annoying in that it was the clichéd hand held documentary look that was mostly filmed in close ups and medium shots. There are very few wide shots, which adds a claustrophobia to the film which is more visually boring than psychologically immersive. It held my attention at least despite the small scale of it just being mostly a few characters talking in the one house.



Kill List (2011) 6
It's deliberately banal in a soap style domestic rows sort of way. Just because it's deliberate doesn't stop it from actually being a bit banal. I knew going in that it has a weird ending that comes out of nowhere so I was primed for that. I'm surprised people are surprised by the ending. Even without knowing in advance there are plenty of hints that things are going to get weird. There are lots of odd moments (signing a contract in blood) and lots of occult references (the woman the Irish hit man is dating is clearly a witch of some sort). The Hammer horror ending does not come out of nowhere. It's very clearly sign posted. An attentive viewer should know things are going to get occult by the end. For me the ending isn't random, it is of a piece of what has gone before. For me the problem is: there is no explanation at the end for the events that have gone before. It makes the whole film feel like a shapeless string of scenes with little connection tying it all together (Full Metal Jacket style). Why were they hired to kill those people? Why did they say thank you when they were being killed? Why does it end with him being tricked into killing those people? Maybe there is a reason, or maybe it's so ambiguous the makers have no answers? There is a lack of an overall point. I'm just not convinced the first third has much to do with the second third and so on. The various parts of the movie seemed too disconnected from each other. I liked the film but it was no masterpiece.



Sightseers (2012) 4
I didn't like the lead characters. They were annoying as they struggled to communicate. I find characters who can't seem to talk with clarity to each other to be irritating. Apparently the lead actors-writers had been playing these people on stage for about a year, but I didn't pick up much actual character from them. They were blank and devoid of any particular life or quirk. The whole tone of the film stems directly from them, so I found the whole movie to be kind of annoying. It's incident packed but its the usual parochial banality of everyday domestic English life that dominates the film, like it does the directors two previous movies. It's a preoccupation the director has that I can't say I share. The kills aren't well filmed (the attack on the author in the early morning being particularly poor). There are a few laughs in the movie. The ending is quite good and amusing. It was very watchable but I can't say I cared much for it.



A Field in England (2013) 5
[This is an older review I've already posted]
After I got past the ropey and unappealing first ten minutes it became okay. I eventually bought into it and the plot was developing at a decent pace. When they start digging the plot grinds to a halt as they run out of story. So they resort to a lot of time wasting meandering. Then the climax is just a lot of weird, psychedelic, quickly edited abstract nonsense in the place of much actual content. I imagine the script could have simply read, 'Ten minutes of random, weirdly edited images that don't mean much.' The ending is not outright bad as it's watchable and not tiresome, but it's still not much of a climax to reduce everything to someone farting around in the editing room with experimental cutting. What is here is quite good, and there are a few flashes of wit and insight in some of the dialogue, but they gave up on telling a coherent story all the way up to the last third. It's not a great film but I think it will be as well remembered, and perhaps even as critically admired, as The Witchfinder General and The Wicker Man in the years to come - if for no other reason than there aren't a lot of other movies like these. It also reminded me of The Seventh Seal (1957). The black and white cinematography was annoying as the blacks were so deep that they sucked up all visual information and became black holes without any detail.


Totally disagree with your views on the poor Oblivion, the awful Lady In The Water, he superb The Brood, and Ben Wheatley's fine films, but hey, that's films for you. I always enjoy reading your reviews and still hope you will post your Evil Dead ones

_____________________________

check out more of my reviews on http://horrorcultfilms.co.uk/

(in reply to Platter)
Post #: 15125
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 1/9/2013 9:00:48 PM   
Dr Lenera

 

Posts: 3980
Joined: 19/10/2005

quote:

ORIGINAL: Whistler



Directors: Nat Faxon, Jim Rash
Cast: Steve Carell, Sam Rockwell, Toni Collette, Allison Janney, Liam James, Maya Rudolf, AnnSophia Robb, Rob Corddry, Amanda Peet
Running time: 103 minutes
Certification: 12A

While spending the summer away from home, socially awkward teenager Duncan (James) struggles to fit in anywhere. Growing fed-up with his demeaning new dad (Carell), his wicked half-sister, his increasingly distant mother (Collette) and all of their laissezfaire friends, he finds welcome at a nearby water park where he befriends one of the staff members, the free-spirited, father-like figure Owen (Rockwell).

I’m a bit of a sucker for touching indie comedy dramas. The Descendants (written by our Way, Way Back writer/directors Nat Faxon and Jim Rash) was one of my favourite films of 2011. Stuck In Love., from earlier this year, is one of my favourite films of this year, and Little Miss Sunshine is one of my favourite films of all time. There’s a pattern there, clearly. It’s a genre I just warm to. Something about their simplicity and down-to-earth nature, the telling of real stories and real characters in real settings provides such satisfying arcs, and it’s something I aspire to as a writer.

The Way, Way Back brings us into the world of Duncan, a shy, awkward, slightly oppressed young boy struggling to find happiness with his new family, played wonderfully by the young actor Liam James with the perfect mix of awkward but cool, totally sympathetic and completely lovable. His mother’s new boyfriend, Trent, is a jerk – played marvelously against type by an unusually bearded and ripped Steve Carell – who masquerades as a character-building type who’s trying to improve Duncan, but in reality just berates and puts him down at every turn, and whom Duncan knows is always trying to embarrass him. We open with the scene that opened all the trailers: Trent asking Duncan what he rates himself out of ten, before offering a rating himself; an insulting, spirit-destroying three. If you want to know how to set-up a character quickly without any fuss, look no further than here. Within one minute of the film starting, Trent is one of the biggest assholes we’ve ever known, and Duncan is one of the most sympathetic protagonists.

The vehement attributes of their relationship being cemented so early on is essential in building the future relationship between Duncan and Owen, as it acts as a sort of catalytic bridge to everything Duncan is looking for in not just a father, but a friend. Sam Rockwell is fantastic. Really fantastic. He’s impressed me in everything he’s done and sure enough it’s no different here. He brings such energy and charisma to every frame, filling the audience with the same sense of inspiration and awe that Duncan so clearly feels. Being the two standout performances of the film, the scenes with he and Duncan together sparkle and shine.

Rash and Faxon’s film taps into the often tremulous and arduous trials of childhood expertly. It brings to fruition that feeling that you don’t fit it, that you can’t speak your mind, that everyone’s laughing at you, and plays on the smallest childhood embarrassments like having to wear a bulky, stupid-looking life jacket when no-one else done. I imagine we’ve all felt similar at one point or another. It even plays on the excruciating awkwardness that seems so defectively inherent with board games, using it as a device to break down the relationships once and for all. They’re supposed to be harmless fun for the family, and often they are, but we’ve all experienced the awkward heat when playing with the wrong people. There’s distinctly nothing less fun than that very moment.

What ultimately wins us over in The Way, Way Back is its believability. We don’t just watch Duncan’s frustration, we feel it, like Pacino in Serpico when he smashes up the office, and at times it’s excruciating. Furthermore, we don’t simply witness the bond forming between Duncan and Owen, but we almost feel a part of it – explicitly because we were instantly so connected and sympathetic towards Duncan, and won over by Owen’s guardian-like charm. Credit to the marvelous writing, bringing us characters we know and care about (or don’t care about in Trent and his daughter’s case) and delivering a story that plays so skillfully, and at times, reverently, on the childhood experience.

This is a really touching, funny and emotive little drama that wins us over in one minute and doesn’t stop for the next hundred. Leaving us completely and totally satisfied without feeling the need to wrap things up in too perfect a bundle, The Way, Way Back is an often surprising, wonderfully inspiring and really quite beautiful film.


God your reviews are getting so good now, I will say I couldn't stand Little Miss Sunshine, but did enjoy The Descendants so I will check this out soon, even if it doesn't seem like my cup of tea.

_____________________________

check out more of my reviews on http://horrorcultfilms.co.uk/

(in reply to Whistler)
Post #: 15126
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 1/9/2013 11:03:38 PM   
Whistler


Posts: 3124
Joined: 22/11/2006

quote:

ORIGINAL: Dr Lenera


quote:

ORIGINAL: Whistler



Directors: Nat Faxon, Jim Rash
Cast: Steve Carell, Sam Rockwell, Toni Collette, Allison Janney, Liam James, Maya Rudolf, AnnSophia Robb, Rob Corddry, Amanda Peet
Running time: 103 minutes
Certification: 12A

While spending the summer away from home, socially awkward teenager Duncan (James) struggles to fit in anywhere. Growing fed-up with his demeaning new dad (Carell), his wicked half-sister, his increasingly distant mother (Collette) and all of their laissezfaire friends, he finds welcome at a nearby water park where he befriends one of the staff members, the free-spirited, father-like figure Owen (Rockwell).

I’m a bit of a sucker for touching indie comedy dramas. The Descendants (written by our Way, Way Back writer/directors Nat Faxon and Jim Rash) was one of my favourite films of 2011. Stuck In Love., from earlier this year, is one of my favourite films of this year, and Little Miss Sunshine is one of my favourite films of all time. There’s a pattern there, clearly. It’s a genre I just warm to. Something about their simplicity and down-to-earth nature, the telling of real stories and real characters in real settings provides such satisfying arcs, and it’s something I aspire to as a writer.

The Way, Way Back brings us into the world of Duncan, a shy, awkward, slightly oppressed young boy struggling to find happiness with his new family, played wonderfully by the young actor Liam James with the perfect mix of awkward but cool, totally sympathetic and completely lovable. His mother’s new boyfriend, Trent, is a jerk – played marvelously against type by an unusually bearded and ripped Steve Carell – who masquerades as a character-building type who’s trying to improve Duncan, but in reality just berates and puts him down at every turn, and whom Duncan knows is always trying to embarrass him. We open with the scene that opened all the trailers: Trent asking Duncan what he rates himself out of ten, before offering a rating himself; an insulting, spirit-destroying three. If you want to know how to set-up a character quickly without any fuss, look no further than here. Within one minute of the film starting, Trent is one of the biggest assholes we’ve ever known, and Duncan is one of the most sympathetic protagonists.

The vehement attributes of their relationship being cemented so early on is essential in building the future relationship between Duncan and Owen, as it acts as a sort of catalytic bridge to everything Duncan is looking for in not just a father, but a friend. Sam Rockwell is fantastic. Really fantastic. He’s impressed me in everything he’s done and sure enough it’s no different here. He brings such energy and charisma to every frame, filling the audience with the same sense of inspiration and awe that Duncan so clearly feels. Being the two standout performances of the film, the scenes with he and Duncan together sparkle and shine.

Rash and Faxon’s film taps into the often tremulous and arduous trials of childhood expertly. It brings to fruition that feeling that you don’t fit it, that you can’t speak your mind, that everyone’s laughing at you, and plays on the smallest childhood embarrassments like having to wear a bulky, stupid-looking life jacket when no-one else done. I imagine we’ve all felt similar at one point or another. It even plays on the excruciating awkwardness that seems so defectively inherent with board games, using it as a device to break down the relationships once and for all. They’re supposed to be harmless fun for the family, and often they are, but we’ve all experienced the awkward heat when playing with the wrong people. There’s distinctly nothing less fun than that very moment.

What ultimately wins us over in The Way, Way Back is its believability. We don’t just watch Duncan’s frustration, we feel it, like Pacino in Serpico when he smashes up the office, and at times it’s excruciating. Furthermore, we don’t simply witness the bond forming between Duncan and Owen, but we almost feel a part of it – explicitly because we were instantly so connected and sympathetic towards Duncan, and won over by Owen’s guardian-like charm. Credit to the marvelous writing, bringing us characters we know and care about (or don’t care about in Trent and his daughter’s case) and delivering a story that plays so skillfully, and at times, reverently, on the childhood experience.

This is a really touching, funny and emotive little drama that wins us over in one minute and doesn’t stop for the next hundred. Leaving us completely and totally satisfied without feeling the need to wrap things up in too perfect a bundle, The Way, Way Back is an often surprising, wonderfully inspiring and really quite beautiful film.


God your reviews are getting so good now, I will say I couldn't stand Little Miss Sunshine, but did enjoy The Descendants so I will check this out soon, even if it doesn't seem like my cup of tea.


Thanks, Dr. I'm sure not everyone will love it as much as I did, but I definitely recommend giving it a go. It's probably closer to The Descendants than LMS, so you might just be pleasantly surprised.

Sure hope I like You're Next more than you, though!

(in reply to Dr Lenera)
Post #: 15127
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 2/9/2013 1:43:30 PM   
losthighway


Posts: 3248
Joined: 25/1/2006
From: Manchesterford
I've been to the cinema...

LOVELACE... A very good film that does feel a bit straight to DVD for the most part but then a swap in character/narrative POV about a 2/3 of the way through really lifts it above that. I really enjoyed it (if that's the right adjective!). It's a sad film but one that certainly deserves more recognition than it's getting on what appears to be a very limited cinematic release. I suspect the DVD/BR won't be far away as Amazon already have the cover art. It's well worth catching. Overall: 4/5

YOU'RE NEXT... I'm almost with the good Dr on this one. A lot of hype and very little originality. I'm not sure who thought this was the next generation of horror and a game changer like Scream but god forbid if this is the future. The tone is all over the place with some moments of humour which don't particularly sit well and aren't actually that funny. A central female character who is cartoonish in the extreme (what the fuck was all that Home Alone style shit about... I mean really!!). The twist is blatantly obvious about 30mins into the film due to the aforementioned lack of originality and a slip of the tongue during a car scene. Yes, it's gory but it's just not scary and the Home Alone moment is just sat there waiting to be used for a good 20mins towards the end so there's no real excitement about it. Also, the score changes to synth-based in the final third and just seems to have been thrown in for the sake of saying, look we're real horror fans who can pay homage rather than it actually having any relevance to the film you're watching. I wouldn't say I hated it but I think the weight of expectation the reviews have placed upon it do it no favours. Once you get past the fact this film is basically a straight to DVD feature that has somehow made its way onto the big screen then it's enjoyable enough but an instantly forgettable one. Overall: 2.5/5

Oh and Whistler, start doing scores out of 5 or 10...

(Oh and the one positive I would give You're Next is that the bearded brother was one of the few pleasures within the film! )

< Message edited by losthighway -- 2/9/2013 1:46:58 PM >


_____________________________

The secret to becoming a star is knowing how to behave like one.

(in reply to Whistler)
Post #: 15128
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 3/9/2013 10:58:25 PM   
Mister Coe

 

Posts: 1561
Joined: 20/10/2012
quote:

ORIGINAL: Dr Lenera


Dave Lizewski is having a break from being Kick-Ass, but is being trained to be tougher by Hit-Girl, aka Mindy Macready. Then Mindy decides to retire from her Hit-Girl persona at the request of her new guardian, and bored Dave gets back into his superhero career, joining a team of fellow vigilantes called 'Justice Forever' and getting involved in a physical relationship with one of them, Night-Bitch. However, Chris d'Amico wants revenge on Kick-Ass for killing his dad. Unfortunately, his mother doesn't seem to care, his bodyguard Javier just does as told, and his uncle Ralph just wants to take back control of the family business and have everyone lay low. Accidently killing his mother, he decides to follow in his father's footsteps and become a super-villain known as The Mother ******, hiring his own gang in the process…….

Kick-Ass was a real breath of fresh air, a wonderfully anarchic, often down-to-earth yet still often outrageous take on the superhero genre that was sometimes insanely funny, but also had heart when it needed it. Though David Gillespie sings its praises elsewhere on this website, I felt that, whilst overall a success, it did have its problems. Too many situations and even lines came from other films, while the idea of an eleven year old girl swearing like a trouper, even if the actress is thirteen in real life [which hardly makes a difference really], has surely got to be questionable, even in this day and age where foul language is sadly the province of the very young almost as much as it is of the young. Nonetheless, with its often razor-sharp script which parodied conventions as well as providing believable characters, outstanding direction by Matthew Vaughn especially during the action scenes, and excellent performances, it was a film which all involved could be proud of, and it also proved that you don't need a huge amount of money to make a good film of this type.

So onto Kick-Ass 2, and the first movie ended with the possibility of a sequel, while since then writer Mark Millar, whose graphic novel of the same name provided the basis for Kick-Ass, wrote not just Kick-Ass 2 but Hit-Girl, continuing the story of Mindy. Unfortunately, even if you bear those factors in mind, Kick-Ass 2, which is based on both of the sequel graphic novels, still feels like one of those sequels that are made because the first film made money, not because the people involved really wanted to continue the story and cared about the characters. It was the director of Kick-Ass Matthew Vaughn who picked Jeff Wadlow to write and direct this sequel, and I bet he regrets it now. It has little of the humour, charm, heart and idealism of the first, just mechanically rehashing most of its 'beats', often to a tedious level. In this film Kick-Ass and Hit-Girl both decide to take off their masks and leave being superheroes four or five times and it becomes laughable, but not in a good way. The characters fail to be rounded as they were before, while most of the comedy seems to revolve around people saying rude sexual insults to each other. The story is even more derivative and is further hampered by far too many scenes, even important ones, lasting just a few seconds, as if the film was hastily cut down. Actually, I think it seems unfinished.

After the first few minutes we have our first action scene, and straight-away it's obvious that you're not watching a film that is anywhere near the first one in quality. One of the best things about the original is that each action scene was different and even filmed in a different manner. Here, with one exception, all you get is a load of martial arts fights which is appallingly shot with the camera being waved around trying to keep up with what is happening and hyper-fast cutting. Here's an idea for all those incompetent directors and cinematographers who feel it is 'cool' and 'edgy' to shoot action this way: how about pulling back, letting shots last more than a second and keeping the bloody camera still so we can see what the hell is going on? The Wolverine had that problem, and before that World War Z [though that film was bad in many other ways too], and so forth. What is especially sad about the employment of this style in Kick-Ass 2 is that the film contains one really good action sequence involving Hit-Girl assaulting a van that is shot properly. Silly but very exciting, it's probably the highlight of the film.

Much of the first half alternates almost like clockwork between three plot lines. There's Mindy trying to settle in at high school and clashing with the' royalty', many scenes reminiscent of Mean Girls but without that film's wit. There's Dave forming a band of superheroes in scenes which are occasionally amusing but were done much better in Mystery Men. Then there's Chris becoming the first super-villain and also forming a group of like-minded folk, which leads to a vile bit of business where he begins to rape someone but can't 'get it up'. I'm assuming this scene is supposed to be funny. It would have been better if the rape had actually gone ahead than it being used as an attempt to get a laugh. The film also attempts to have its cake and eat it several times like having Chris give his hench-people racist names. I laughed a couple of times, but too much of the script consists of either would-be funny stuff which falls flat or dialogue which is almost the same being repeated from scene to scene. And there is one scene which is just totally bad on all levels. It involves 'Mother Russia' and some cops in cars, and the combination of bad staging, awful editing, inept special effects and pure stupidity results in truly atrocious filmmaking which is painful to watch. The effects are often amazingly shoddy throughout. We're all used to crappy CGI blood, but why on earth was it thought okay to show people vomiting when you can see a gap between the mouth and the vomit?

Most of the time, Kick-Ass 2 is not as bad as all that. In fact, it's generally average viewing that passes the time reasonably enough if you switch your brain off and don't want to care about what is happening on-screen. It's probably more brutal than the first film, though the violence usually has less impact. It's actually been considerably toned down from the comics and almost as much happens off-screen as on it, which brings me to Jim Carrey. I wonder if his decision not to publicise Kick-Ass 2 was not so much because of a reaction to the Sandy Hook killings, but because he took one look at his performance and felt ashamed. I consider Carrey to be an excellent actor in both comic and serious roles, but he seems lost here, never getting a handle on his character. Thankfully almost every other major member of the cast does a very good job. Aaron Taylor-Johnson emits considerable sensitivity and looks like he's done a considerable amount of working out since the last film to boot, while Chloe Grace Moretz seems to be getting better and better and I can't wait for her take on Carrie White. The stunningly gorgeous Lindy Booth, whom I can't understand isn't a big star by now, puts in what is easily her most memorable film appearance so far.

Watching Kick-Ass 2, I developed an even better appreciation of Kick-Ass then I had before. It was a delicate balancing act and navigated some difficult waters, but somehow, for the most part, they pulled it off. Consequently, Kick-Ass 2 feels like the movie Kick-Ass could have been if things hadn't gone so right. Even the soundtrack, which reuses some of the original score themes but includes far less other music, isn't anywhere near as good. It partially entertains, but is sunk by laziness [example: why bring back two strong characters from the first film and do nothing with them?], callousness and just plain poor filmmaking. The spark is gone.

Rating: 4.5/10


Sorry to be late to the party, but I watched Kick-Ass 2 today and here's my opinion...

Mostly disappointing.  I loved the original KA, but this was just a cash-grab.  No real story, just someone writing enough scenes and lines until they had a long enough script to make a movie out of it.  And, yes, I know it was a comic book before it was a movie, but can someone please tell me what was missed out so it would be a coherant sequel?

I really hated the Mindy trying-to-fit-in-with-the-cool girls storyline.  Really hated it.  But not as much as I hated the sick-stick ending.  So awful and not funny... CGI vomiting and diarrhoeah... yeah, hilarious...

The ending... yeah, they're setting up a HIT GIRL movie just as soon as CGM turns 18 ...shame it won't be as amusing as when she was a little girl, killing people left right and centre and swearing like a sailor... it'll be just another cute -girl-killing -people movie... I predict a flop.

Jim Carrey was great, but all his best bits were in the trailer.  Night Bitch was pretty cute, though... hey, I'm a man, what can I say? 

All in all, a pretty disappointing experience, IMO. 



_____________________________

Say what now?

(in reply to Dr Lenera)
Post #: 15129
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 4/9/2013 9:59:50 AM   
UTB


Posts: 9872
Joined: 30/9/2005
Haven't seen KA2 but from the reviews I've read it sounds exactly like the first one

(in reply to Mister Coe)
Post #: 15130
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 4/9/2013 10:24:26 AM   
Whistler


Posts: 3124
Joined: 22/11/2006

quote:

ORIGINAL: losthighway

Oh and Whistler, start doing scores out of 5 or 10...



You're not the first person to say that. We actually sort of had this discussion a bit earlier, about how I do use ratings on my website but would prefer not to 'cause I often find them too restrictive. I know it's nice for the reader to have a quick idea of how the reviewer feels about the film, but sometimes I genuinely can't decide what score to give it because maybe I really love some of it and dislike other bits etc. It's so much easier to explain that through words than just giving a 3/5 or 5/10.

...But I guess I could start doing it here if people would prefer.

(For the record, I gave The Way, Way Back 9/10 )

(in reply to losthighway)
Post #: 15131
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 4/9/2013 12:33:08 PM   
paul.mccluskey


Posts: 5159
Joined: 15/4/2007
From: Port Glasgow, Scotland, UK
Watched the remake of The Amityville Horror at the weekend. More creepy than actually scary. It plays out like a typical haunted house movie, although several films before have done it better, for example, The Haunting (not the version with Liam Neeson!). Ryan Reynolds and Melissa George were convincing as George and Kathy Lutz. I've always been intrigued by the story, I don't know whether to believe it.

For Hammer Horror fans, Frankenstein and the Monster from Hell will air on the Horror Channel on Friday at 10.55pm. No word on whether it's uncut though.

(in reply to Whistler)
Post #: 15132
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 4/9/2013 12:49:32 PM   
Whistler


Posts: 3124
Joined: 22/11/2006

quote:

ORIGINAL: paul.mccluskey

Watched the remake of The Amityville Horror at the weekend. More creepy than actually scary. It plays out like a typical haunted house movie, although several films before have done it better, for example, The Haunting (not the version with Liam Neeson!). Ryan Reynolds and Melissa George were convincing as George and Kathy Lutz. I've always been intrigued by the story, I don't know whether to believe it.



Well The Haunting is the benchmark, but I really like the remake of Amityville. Thoroughly creepy and Reynolds is great.

(in reply to paul.mccluskey)
Post #: 15133
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 5/9/2013 11:39:37 AM   
losthighway


Posts: 3248
Joined: 25/1/2006
From: Manchesterford
I saw KICK ASS 2 yesterday and really enjoyed it. Way better than the original and nowhere near as horrendous as a lot of the reviews suggested. It was what a sequel should be... bigger, better and from the looks of it with a definitive ending. Overall: 4/5

I also saw ELYSIUM the day before and I do not wish to discuss the film other than say... what a major fucking disappointment!!! Overall: 2/5

_____________________________

The secret to becoming a star is knowing how to behave like one.

(in reply to Whistler)
Post #: 15134
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 5/9/2013 4:17:33 PM   
evil bill


Posts: 6721
Joined: 19/7/2006
From: mordor/ uk
quote:

ORIGINAL: Dr Lenera

quote:

ORIGINAL: Platter

House of Wax (2004) 4 out of 10
.
Oblivion (2013) 8
.
Drive (2011) 7
.
The Brood (1979) 6
.
Psycho (1960) 10
.
Hitchcock (2012) 7
.
Lady in the Water (2006) 8
.
Brake (2011) 10
.Ben Wheatley reviews:

Down Terrace (2009) 4
.
Kill List (2011) 6
.
Sightseers (2012) 4
.
A Field in England (2013) 5
..


Totally disagree with your views on the poor Oblivion, the awful Lady In The Water, he superb The Brood, and Ben Wheatley's fine films, but hey, that's films for you. I always enjoy reading your reviews and still hope you will post your Evil Dead ones

Agree with the Dr , but would add I found DRIVE to be a superb film, well made and with a fine cast, also worth a mention is HITCHCOCK (2012) which I watched the other day, it was well acted and very entertaining, just wish it had of been a proper movie of Hitchcock's career and life. But it did come up with some great facts about the making of his greatest film, and felt like a real tribute to the greatest British director ever.

quote:




quote:

ORIGINAL: Whistler

Yeah I'm hoping to catch You're Next within the next few days. To be honest I didn't think the trailer was that great, but the strong reviews have made me excited. I doubt it will top The Conjuring (for me anyway), but I'm really looking forward to it.



I would say don't bother. I HATED You're Next. I mean, the first 20 mins was good, fine suspenseful build-up, then the kid with Parkinson's disease took over the camera and it became virtually unwatchable for me. Most of the time the director didn't even show you the kills properly. Awful, and it gave me another fucking headache too. I've seen better filmmaking in your average Friday The 13th movie. I'm sure there are good aspects about it, but I lost interest half an hour in, stopped caring, and almost walked out. I'm not doing a review [DJ on our website gave it 1 out of 10!], because once again I'll end up too annoyed doing it. Not for the first time this year, I'm seriously worried about cinema. 3.5/10 at the most.


Watched this sad excuse of a slasher on Tuesday, and yeah decent build up then all down hill, and now wish I had not bothered to spend my hard earned cash on this CRAP!!!! film. I would never compare it to Friday The 13TH, not even the remake, which looks like a classic compared to this god awful film, and the shaky camera, for F**k sake give me a break, it's noting new it's been done to death , it's only good for covering up shit direction. Ahh!!! that's it that's why they used it, it is the worse movie I've paid to see this year in fact this decade, i'm usually good at avoiding this shit.

_____________________________

"You listen to me now,i will find you and i will kill you!"

(in reply to Dr Lenera)
Post #: 15135
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 5/9/2013 4:26:28 PM   
evil bill


Posts: 6721
Joined: 19/7/2006
From: mordor/ uk
quote:

ORIGINAL: Whistler



Directors: Nat Faxon, Jim Rash
Cast: Steve Carell, Sam Rockwell, Toni Collette, Allison Janney, Liam James, Maya Rudolf, AnnSophia Robb, Rob Corddry, Amanda Peet
Running time: 103 minutes
Certification: 12A
.

This is a really touching, funny and emotive little drama that wins us over in one minute and doesn't stop for the next hundred. Leaving us completely and totally satisfied without feeling the need to wrap things up in too perfect a bundle, The Way, Way Back is an often surprising, wonderfully inspiring and really quite beautiful film.

Great review just don't know if it's my kind of film. maybe a Sunday night sort of film.

quote:


quote:

ORIGINAL: paul.mccluskey

Watched the remake of The Amityville Horror at the weekend. More creepy than actually scary. It plays out like a typical haunted house movie, although several films before have done it better, for example, The Haunting (not the version with Liam Neeson!). Ryan Reynolds and Melissa George were convincing as George and Kathy Lutz. I've always been intrigued by the story, I don't know whether to believe it.




Well The Haunting is the benchmark, but I really like the remake of Amityville. Thoroughly creepy and Reynolds is great.


The Haunting was a bench mark, and both the original and remake of Amityville Horror failed to impress me, they never learned from that classic, how to make you jump out of your skin. The acting was only slightly better in the remake, but being a remake it never out classed the first film, which it should have done as it never captured the fear and chills of the book, which still needs a proper film made of it.

_____________________________

"You listen to me now,i will find you and i will kill you!"

(in reply to Whistler)
Post #: 15136
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 5/9/2013 4:37:33 PM   
evil bill


Posts: 6721
Joined: 19/7/2006
From: mordor/ uk
quote:

ORIGINAL: losthighway

I saw KICK ASS 2 yesterday and really enjoyed it. Way better than the original and nowhere near as horrendous as a lot of the reviews suggested. It was what a sequel should be... bigger, better and from the looks of it with a definitive ending. Overall: 4/5

I also saw ELYSIUM the day before and I do not wish to discuss the film other than say... what a major fucking disappointment!!! Overall: 2/5
I've been to the cinema...

LOVELACE... A very good film that does feel a bit straight to DVD for the most part but then a swap in character/narrative POV about a 2/3 of the way through really lifts it above that. I really enjoyed it (if that's the right adjective!). It's a sad film but one that certainly deserves more recognition than it's getting on what appears to be a very limited cinematic release. I suspect the DVD/BR won't be far away as Amazon already have the cover art. It's well worth catching. Overall: 4/5

YOU'RE NEXT... I'm almost with the good Dr on this one. A lot of hype and very little originality. I'm not sure who thought this was the next generation of horror and a game changer like Scream but god forbid if this is the future. The tone is all over the place with some moments of humour which don't particularly sit well and aren't actually that funny. A central female character who is cartoonish in the extreme (what the fuck was all that Home Alone style shit about... I mean really!!). The twist is blatantly obvious about 30mins into the film due to the aforementioned lack of originality and a slip of the tongue during a car scene. Yes, it's gory but it's just not scary and the Home Alone moment is just sat there waiting to be used for a good 20mins towards the end so there's no real excitement about it. Also, the score changes to synth-based in the final third and just seems to have been thrown in for the sake of saying, look we're real horror fans who can pay homage rather than it actually having any relevance to the film you're watching. I wouldn't say I hated it but I think the weight of expectation the reviews have placed upon it do it no favours. Once you get past the fact this film is basically a straight to DVD feature that has somehow made its way onto the big screen then it's enjoyable enough but an instantly forgettable one. Overall: 2.5/5



Well there is a real split with Kick Ass 2, I think i'll wait for the rental Blu-Ray now, and surprised you felt Elysium was a disappointment, though I understand as I felt it fell short of District 9, but is one of the better Sci/Fi films of this year. As far as YOUR NEXT, well I had my rant and can only give it 1/10 for it's first few minutes that worked, but after watching the wonderful Conjuring noting was going to scare me as much as that, or look as good, horror wise. LOVELACE, now this is a film I would like to see, but no sign of it over here, so will have to wait for the DVD/Blu-Ray, or it might still turn up in our own QFT arthouse cinema.

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Post #: 15137
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 5/9/2013 9:22:54 PM   
Whistler


Posts: 3124
Joined: 22/11/2006
Woah, you guys weren't lying about You're Next. Will write a review tomorrow.

(in reply to evil bill)
Post #: 15138
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 6/9/2013 4:33:08 PM   
evil bill


Posts: 6721
Joined: 19/7/2006
From: mordor/ uk
quote:

ORIGINAL: Whistler

Woah, you guys weren't lying about You're Next. Will write a review tomorrow.

You see you don't listen, anyway look forward to your review, as I just can't be bothered with this piece of trash cinema, but some one has to do it for at least a warning to those who dare go to see it.


_____________________________

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Post #: 15139
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 6/9/2013 8:34:04 PM   
Whistler


Posts: 3124
Joined: 22/11/2006
I'll probably touch this up later as I just whipped it together in a few minutes with a beer, but here goes... (and yes, there's a rating on it )



Director: Adam Wingard
Cast: Sharni Vinson, Nicholas Tucci, Wendy Glenn, AJ Bowen, Joe Swanberg, Ti West, Barbara Crampton
Running time: 94 minutes
Certification: 18

A large, slightly disconnected family, while at an awkward reunion in a house in the middle of the woods, is brutally attacked by a group of masked men and individually picked off. What the attackers didn’t count on, however, was the survival skills of the beautiful, seemingly innocent Erin (Vinson).

My approach to You’re Next was a strange one. Having seen and been thoroughly unimpressed by the trailer shortly before release, I was soon herded in the opposite direction and filled with anticipation once the reviews began pouring in. Quotes like “unique”, “darkly comic” and “stylish and entertaining” were being thrown around like a frisbees, and it currently sits at a healthy 74% on Rotten Tomatoes. So I was really in two minds about before going in. From a personal point of view I didn’t expect much, but from a critical point of view I was ready to see something quite special. Something special never came.

Let’s start with the good things – or rather, the less bad things. The idea is fairly unique. Perhaps not the premise (we’ve seen the cabin – or in this case, house – in the woods horror movie a bunch of times) but the utilization of that premise is a rather refreshing take on the genre. Instead of a group of rowdy, sex-obsessed teens partying in the woods (there is still a bit of unnecessary nudity, mind you), we focus on a large family, detached from each other through time spent apart and old arguments, with each of the siblings introducing their respective partners to the family for the first time to create some fabulously awkward moments. I really liked the idea of that as the template for a slasher movie because we haven’t really seen it before. We know how the teens react to it, but how would they react to what’s happening?

If only the script was good enough to tell us. Yes it has the ideas, but it sure doesn’t have the skill or panache to pull them off. So much of the dialogue is woeful, and the acting is probably worse. It does get better as the film wears on, but the during the opening half hour or so it’s next to laughable. Take the mother (Crampton – who looks exactly like an older Alison Brie) hearing a noise upstairs and instantly going into erratic crying mode and being herded from the house. You really have to see the scene to understand the criticism, but it just lacks so much conviction. I really don’t know if it’s the acting or the script or an amalgamation of both, but it was truly awful.

And there are so, so many stupid decisions from characters. Now look, I’ve watched my share of slasher movies over the years and I know as well as anyone that the main characters generally lack basic common sense, but deary me, it just gets ridiculous in You’re Next. “Oh look, I’ve just killed a guy with a meat tenderizer, but instead of taking his axe I’ll just stick with this tiny little thing and get everyone to find a different weapon.” ”Oh look, I’ve just escaped the house full of bad guys and I’m now running into the woods. Better stop and take out my torch. I’ll wave it around a little, too, just in case they don’t see me the first time.” You get the idea.

You can see the film, at least some of the time, is trying really hard to be self-aware and genre-literate, in the way that, for example, Scream so effortlessly was. It’s trying to make light of itself while still providing the proper frights and sense of dread, but the problem is that instead of coming off as darkly comic in the way that it so wants to, it comes off as misplaced humour in a below average and extremely straight-played slasher flick. Once you wade your way through the bucket-loads of blood and countless number of gruesome deaths, you'll find yourself at the final scene where someone tries to make light of the whole situation with a joke. It's a scene that sort of epitomizes the tone of the whole movie, in that it's trying to parody itself but it really just comes off as gratuitous and misjudged. If done in the right way with the right respect this kind of flippancy can work - sometimes brilliantly (again, see Scream) - but in You're Next few things are done in the right way.

The overriding problem, really, is that it’s a film lacking in confidence. Sure on the surface it looks all gleaming and knowing and self-referential, but underneath it really creaks and wobbles. The director doesn’t know how he wants to handle the action sequences so he just clouds them in infamous shaky cam (it is literally horrible), and he seems so afraid that the scares aren't going to work that he SCREAMS them at us rather than letting them play out on their own. I did jump a few times, I’m not denying it, but I jumped because of a sound effect shouting at me, not because of what happened in the drama. Nothing about it scared me or even creeped me out just a little.

Compared to just a month ago when we were being terrified by the The Conjuring, You’re Next is a huge disappointment. In a year lacking in entries to the genre we expect and demand so much more than this. A couple of decent moments and a cool soundtrack aren’t enough to quench the parched mouths of the horror masses. Please do better.

3/10

< Message edited by Whistler -- 6/9/2013 10:54:02 PM >

(in reply to evil bill)
Post #: 15140
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 6/9/2013 8:34:42 PM   
losthighway


Posts: 3248
Joined: 25/1/2006
From: Manchesterford
Just booked to see the National Theatre production of LET THE RIGHT ONE IN at the Royal Court in December. Now many of you know from my years of ranting that I love the book, the original film was good but did the novel zero justice and the US remake is fantastic hitting the tone of the novel spot on (although still no sign of zombie Hakan!). I'll admit I still get annoyed at Eli being referred to as a 'girl' when this is not the case but hey I'm older and less angry these days, plus this production has had very goods reviews so roll on December!

My copy of HANNIBAL: COMPLETE SEASON ONE on BR arrived today. Sadly the UK has been totally shafted on extras compared with the forthcoming US release but it's such sheer class I can manage without and I am sure some kind soul will upload the extras onto YouTube eventually!

Neither weird or strange but you know I always veer off the path on this thread... I'm also dying to see ANY DAY NOW with Alan Cumming. It has landed here in Manchester but only two evening screenings a day(!!) so going to have to get my ass over to the Odeon before it disappears next Thursday. If it's showing near you then go cos apparently it's well worth checking out.

< Message edited by losthighway -- 6/9/2013 8:38:51 PM >


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Post #: 15141
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 6/9/2013 11:35:22 PM   
Mister Coe

 

Posts: 1561
Joined: 20/10/2012
quote:

ORIGINAL: losthighway

I saw KICK ASS 2 yesterday and really enjoyed it. Way better than the original and nowhere near as horrendous as a lot of the reviews suggested. It was what a sequel should be... bigger, better and from the looks of it with a definitive ending. Overall: 4/5

I also saw ELYSIUM the day before and I do not wish to discuss the film other than say... what a major fucking disappointment!!! Overall: 2/5




Agree with you about Elysium, though...

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Say what now?

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Post #: 15142
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 7/9/2013 2:52:38 PM   
evil bill


Posts: 6721
Joined: 19/7/2006
From: mordor/ uk
quote:

ORIGINAL: Whistler

I'll probably touch this up later as I just whipped it together in a few minutes with a beer, but here goes... (and yes, there's a rating on it )




Compared to just a month ago when we were being terrified by the The Conjuring, You're Next is a huge disappointment. In a year lacking in entries to the genre we expect and demand so much more than this. A couple of decent moments and a cool soundtrack aren't enough to quench the parched mouths of the horror masses. Please do better.

3/10

Awesome  review that makes it seem a lot better film than it was,, and you're on the money, what a HUGE disappointment, from what has been a dull year for horror films, except THE CONJURING.

_____________________________

"You listen to me now,i will find you and i will kill you!"

(in reply to Whistler)
Post #: 15143
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 7/9/2013 11:21:57 PM   
Whistler


Posts: 3124
Joined: 22/11/2006

quote:

ORIGINAL: Mister Coe

quote:

ORIGINAL: losthighway

I saw KICK ASS 2 yesterday and really enjoyed it. Way better than the original and nowhere near as horrendous as a lot of the reviews suggested. It was what a sequel should be... bigger, better and from the looks of it with a definitive ending. Overall: 4/5

I also saw ELYSIUM the day before and I do not wish to discuss the film other than say... what a major fucking disappointment!!! Overall: 2/5




Agree with you about Elysium, though...


Agree with both. Kick-Ass 2 was great fun, Elysium was a disappointment.

(in reply to Mister Coe)
Post #: 15144
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 7/9/2013 11:24:06 PM   
Whistler


Posts: 3124
Joined: 22/11/2006

quote:

ORIGINAL: evil bill

quote:

ORIGINAL: Whistler

I'll probably touch this up later as I just whipped it together in a few minutes with a beer, but here goes... (and yes, there's a rating on it )




Compared to just a month ago when we were being terrified by the The Conjuring, You're Next is a huge disappointment. In a year lacking in entries to the genre we expect and demand so much more than this. A couple of decent moments and a cool soundtrack aren't enough to quench the parched mouths of the horror masses. Please do better.

3/10

Awesome  review that makes it seem a lot better film than it was,, and you're on the money, what a HUGE disappointment, from what has been a dull year for horror films, except THE CONJURING.


I think I disliked it a jot less than you, but only a jot...

(in reply to evil bill)
Post #: 15145
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 8/9/2013 6:50:07 PM   
Whistler


Posts: 3124
Joined: 22/11/2006
A rather small review for a rather good film.



Director: Drew Lowery
Cast: Casey Affleck, Rooney Mara, Ben Foster, Keith Carradine, Nate Parker, Robert Longstreet, Charles Baker, Augustine Frizzell
Running time: 96 minutes
Certification: 15

When Bob (Affleck) escapes from prison and attempts to reunite with his wife Ruth (Mara) and the daughter he’s never seen, he’s tracked by both the law that separated them in the first place and the revenge-seeking men that Bob double-crossed years before.

Ain’t Them Bodies Saints is the most naturalistic and modest film you’ll see this year. It’s just beautiful and down-to-earth storytelling. There’s nothing flashy or showy here, nothing attention-grabbing or gut-punching or shock-inducing. There’s nothing that will make you run out of the cinema smiling or crying, nothing that will change your world. It’s just a sad story about love, revenge and consequences, that plays out a little like a Shakespearean tragedy.

Director Drew Lowery’s approach to capturing the earthy feel of rural 70s Texas – the backdrop on which our film is set and balances so delicately on – is to first hire an excellent cinematographer (Bradford Young) and then forgo conventional lighting techniques to the point where our actors’ faces are often completely consumed by shadows. During night sequences, or even just rides in a car when the sun isn’t searing down, we regularly can’t see anyone because there’s a very conscious effort to avoid the artificiality that inherently comes with lighting up a set. This would rarely be allowed in mainstream Hollywood. ”Cover up the star’s face? Never. We paid millions to get them in this thing, you light the crap outta them, dammit!”. Here, though, it pays off wonderfully. We almost don’t need to see their faces because we feel their emotion. There’s a strange ethereal quality to the drama that negates the necessity of such conventional tropes and techniques, and it benefits greatly from it.

There’s a strong resemblance here to There Will Be Blood. It lacks the scope and sheer corporeal power of Paul Thomas Anderson’s masterpiece, but right down to the font used for the titles, it feels as if we’re in a similar place – and that is no bad place to be. If Ain’t Them Bodies Saints doesn’t have the powerhouse performance of Daniel Day Lewis, it has the effortless, brooding presence of Casey Affleck, the younger brother of our new Batman and an astonishing actor who I’ve been a big fan of ever since his small but standout turn in Good Will Hunting. That was really the first time I took notice of him, and he’s just continued to impress me ever since (see The Assassination Of Jesse James By The Coward Robert Ford for further proof of how brilliant this guy is). Rooney Mara also puts in a wonderful turn, and Ben Foster is magnetic as a conflicted, empathetic Sheriff who tries to comfort Ruth and her child despite being shot by Bob just before he was arrested, sparking some truly engaging and reflective moments between the two.

Modest, naturalistic and profoundly affecting. Ain’t Them Bodies Saints is no world-changer, but it’s a beautiful, melancholic piece of work, and one of the unexpected standouts of the year.

8/10

(in reply to Whistler)
Post #: 15146
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 8/9/2013 10:06:59 PM   
Nexus Wookie


Posts: 2326
Joined: 24/9/2011
From: the Godcity
Heavy Metal (1981) One bad-ass animated fantasy rollercoaster! I can understand why it was my (ex-forum) buddy, Snake-Eyes' favourite animated film! The story centres around the Loc-Nar; a green glowing orb which is basically the sum of all evils. It's basically like a macguffin, an object to move the plot forward and entertain us with some brilliant short animated stories. My favourite was 'Harry Canyon', set in a futuristic New York with a Chandler-esque cabbie coming to the aid of a mysterious and seductive damsel in distress. The animation looks very dated, having been released in 1981 (The film is based on the adult comics anthology 'Heavy Metal' originally titled 'Metal Hurlant').'Den' was also great fun, an abridged version of Richard Corben's Neverwhere, with a more comedic tone. The main character Den is voiced by the late John Candy and he does a marvellous job. "So beautiful, so dangerous" was also a lot of fun with some wicked humour, robot and human coupling being one and the 'Jewish wedding/ circumcision' line was a cracker. The last story 'Taarna' was also brilliant, Elmer Bernstein's magnificent score really shines through in this concluding chapter and there are some awesome visuals on show, not least the (computer assisted?) shot of Taarna flying on her petrodactyl-like stead through some mesmerising scenery. It was very evocative of Moebius' silent comic, Arzach. Along with Harry Canyon this was the standout piece for me, it was like a perfect blend of fantasy, sorcery and sci-fi with some topless shots of Taarna thrown in for good measure. By the end, I was awed by this excellent film and hoped it would've lasted a little longer! 4/5

Conan the Barbarian (2011) The re-make starring Jason Momoa as the titular character Conan was also great fun - much more than I expected it to be. I'm a fan of the original film, but I thought Momoa's Conan was more faithful to the original stories by Robert E. Howard. The film was quite unflinching in places, especially violence, although a little tame in the frolicking department. There were some fun turns from the supporting cast, Stephen Lang and Rose McGowan being the standout as the father and daughter duo intent on capturing Tamara (a sassy Rachel Nichols) who carries the bloodline of Acheronian Necromamcers. McGowan in particular looked scary as fuck with her shaved eyebrows and sharp bladed fingers. The scene of her disfiguring and stabbing the maidens from the monastery was very shocking. Ron Perlman as Conan's heavily bearded father was also good, it's always a pleasure to see Perlman on screen as I'm a big fan of his. Saïd Taghmaoui as the thief Ela-Shan was also great fun, like Perlman I'm a fan of Taghmaoui and have followed his career closely since his excellent turn in Matthieu Kossovitz's visceral masterpiece, La Haine. There were some memorable set pieces in the film, such as Conan's fight with the 'sand demons' and the escape from the tentacled 'H.P Lovecraft' monster near the end. As it was filmed on a lower budget than most Hollywood blockbusters, the visual effects do seem poor in a few places, but on the whole it was a great job. There were some great scenic shots such as Conan's entrance into the Kingdom of thieves, and Khalar Zym's palace, scenes which evoke Robert E. Howard's prose to great effect. It's not a perfect film, far from it in fact, but Marcus Nispel's attempts at trying to potray a more faithfil Conan to screen is admirable. I see a certain similarity between this film and John Carter; both films flopped, both are based on famous works from prominent writer's of fantasy and adventure, and both are films which contrary to their poor critical reponses, I enjoyed immensely. 3.5/5

_____________________________

My blog: http://nexuswookie.wordpress.com/

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Post #: 15147
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 9/9/2013 12:06:35 PM   
losthighway


Posts: 3248
Joined: 25/1/2006
From: Manchesterford
ANY DAY NOW

I saw this last night. Heartbreaking and excellent, this film is as important for gay rights as Milk was a few years back. It does have the odd whiff off of Sunday matinee issues special about it but definitely don't let that put you off. The film is based on a true story, the performances by Cumming, Dillahunt and Leyva are fantastic and I really wouldn't be surprised if this gets an Oscar nod next year. It's on a limited release so may need to hunt it out but it is so worth it. Overall: 5/5

Here's the trailer (which doesn't really do it justice with the cheesy music but will give you an idea of what it's about!): http://youtu.be/7ghwGOuuNy0

< Message edited by losthighway -- 9/9/2013 12:08:03 PM >


_____________________________

The secret to becoming a star is knowing how to behave like one.

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Post #: 15148
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 9/9/2013 12:32:29 PM   
paul.mccluskey


Posts: 5159
Joined: 15/4/2007
From: Port Glasgow, Scotland, UK
quote:

ORIGINAL: evil bill

The Haunting was a bench mark, and both the original and remake of Amityville Horror failed to impress me, they never learned from that classic, how to make you jump out of your skin. The acting was only slightly better in the remake, but being a remake it never out classed the first film, which it should have done as it never captured the fear and chills of the book, which still needs a proper film made of it.

I preferred the remake of The Amityville Horror Bill, watched the original on Friday night. Disappointing. Apart from the stellar performances from James Brolin, Margot Kidder and Rid Steiger, the film lacked atmosphere, tension and genuine scares.

(in reply to evil bill)
Post #: 15149
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 9/9/2013 7:43:19 PM   
evil bill


Posts: 6721
Joined: 19/7/2006
From: mordor/ uk
quote:

ORIGINAL: Nexus Wookie

Heavy Metal (1981) One bad-ass animated fantasy rollercoaster! I can understand why it was my (ex-forum) buddy, Snake-Eyes' favourite animated film! The story centres around the Loc-Nar; a green glowing orb which is basically the sum of all evils. It's basically like a macguffin, an object to move the plot forward and entertain us with some brilliant short animated stories. My favourite was 'Harry Canyon', set in a futuristic New York with a Chandler-esque cabbie coming to the aid of a mysterious and seductive damsel in distress. The animation looks very dated, having been released in 1981 (The film is based on the adult comics anthology 'Heavy Metal' originally titled 'Metal Hurlant').'Den' was also great fun, an abridged version of Richard Corben's Neverwhere, with a more comedic tone. The main character Den is voiced by the late John Candy and he does a marvellous job. "So beautiful, so dangerous" was also a lot of fun with some wicked humour, robot and human coupling being one and the 'Jewish wedding/ circumcision' line was a cracker. The last story 'Taarna' was also brilliant, Elmer Bernstein's magnificent score really shines through in this concluding chapter and there are some awesome visuals on show, not least the (computer assisted?) shot of Taarna flying on her petrodactyl-like stead through some mesmerising scenery. It was very evocative of Moebius' silent comic, Arzach. Along with Harry Canyon this was the standout piece for me, it was like a perfect blend of fantasy, sorcery and sci-fi with some topless shots of Taarna thrown in for good measure. By the end, I was awed by this excellent film and hoped it would've lasted a little longer! 4/5

Conan the Barbarian (2011) The re-make starring Jason Momoa as the titular character Conan was also great fun - much more than I expected it to be. I'm a fan of the original film, but I thought Momoa's Conan was more faithful to the original stories by Robert E. Howard. The film was quite unflinching in places, especially violence, although a little tame in the frolicking department. There were some fun turns from the supporting cast, Stephen Lang and Rose McGowan being the standout as the father and daughter duo intent on capturing Tamara (a sassy Rachel Nichols) who carries the bloodline of Acheronian Necromamcers. McGowan in particular looked scary as fuck with her shaved eyebrows and sharp bladed fingers. The scene of her disfiguring and stabbing the maidens from the monastery was very shocking. Ron Perlman as Conan's heavily bearded father was also good, it's always a pleasure to see Perlman on screen as I'm a big fan of his. Saïd Taghmaoui as the thief Ela-Shan was also great fun, like Perlman I'm a fan of Taghmaoui and have followed his career closely since his excellent turn in Matthieu Kossovitz's visceral masterpiece, La Haine. There were some memorable set pieces in the film, such as Conan's fight with the 'sand demons' and the escape from the tentacled 'H.P Lovecraft' monster near the end. As it was filmed on a lower budget than most Hollywood blockbusters, the visual effects do seem poor in a few places, but on the whole it was a great job. There were some great scenic shots such as Conan's entrance into the Kingdom of thieves, and Khalar Zym's palace, scenes which evoke Robert E. Howard's prose to great effect. It's not a perfect film, far from it in fact, but Marcus Nispel's attempts at trying to potray a more faithfil Conan to screen is admirable. I see a certain similarity between this film and John Carter; both films flopped, both are based on famous works from prominent writer's of fantasy and adventure, and both are films which contrary to their poor critical reponses, I enjoyed immensely. 3.5/5

Good old Snake Eyes for getting you into this Cult Classic film, and your review shows it really did give you a kick, and what about those classic Heavy Metal tunes, just awesome. And I agree with you about CONAN remake, it has it's faults, but in no way is it as bad as it was painted by a lot of film critics, the same with JOHN CARTER which I liked big time.

_____________________________

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Post #: 15150
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