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RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 23/7/2013 7:17:52 PM   
Dr Lenera

 

Posts: 3980
Joined: 19/10/2005
I love that review, and tell me how many times have you bought The Beyond Bill?

_____________________________

check out more of my reviews on http://horrorcultfilms.co.uk/

(in reply to evil bill)
Post #: 15031
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 23/7/2013 7:49:41 PM   
evil bill


Posts: 6721
Joined: 19/7/2006
From: mordor/ uk
quote:

ORIGINAL: Dr Lenera

I love that review, and tell me how many times have you bought The Beyond Bill?

 Two versions on VHS tape, Three versions on DVD, and soon hopefully the final one on Blu Ray which I did hold off for as there is a Blu-Ray of this one out there now.  Now A L I E N that's another story, 400Ft Super 8mm version, Laserdisc, VHS single disc, 3 Tape of the Alien Trilogy VHS, Single DVD disc, 4 Disc of the Quadologoy DVD, then the Directors cut DVD, and finally the Blu Ray box set. 

_____________________________

"You listen to me now,i will find you and i will kill you!"

(in reply to Dr Lenera)
Post #: 15032
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 25/7/2013 6:51:15 PM   
Dr Lenera

 

Posts: 3980
Joined: 19/10/2005
And there was me thinking me having bought Suspiria four times was excessive..........

Anyway, don't need to ask if you've seen these two Bill.




In the late 16th century, Rabbi Loew, the head of Prague’s Jewish community, reads the stars and predicts disaster for his people. The next day the Holy Roman Emperor Luhois signs a royal decree declaring that the Jews must leave the city by the end of the month. Luhois sends the knight Florian to deliver the decree, but Florian falls in love with Miriam, Loew’s daughter. Loew talks Florian into reminding Luhois that it is he who predicts disasters and tells the horoscopes of the emperor, and requests an audience with him. Loew begins to create a large man out of clay….

Germany saw an amazing output of strange, compelling and highly artistic horror classics after World War 1. The extremely influential style of these films with their use of things like bizarre sets and forced perspective to give a nightmarish feel became known as German Expressionism. The best known of these pictures are probably The Cabinet Of Dr Caligari and Nosferatu. The Golem isn’t too well known now, though it is a good example of German Expressionism and a very enjoyable combination of historical drama and horror in its own right. Yes, it’s a silent film, but one that is very striking and almost doesn’t even need the few inter-titles that it has. I think a modern viewer will be surprised at how fun it is, and any horror fan will see how influential it was. The Universal horror cycle of the 30’s and 40’s especially was much inspired by The Golem and often used bits and pieces of it.

In Jewish folklore, a golem is an animated anthropomorphic being created entirely from inanimate matter. Golems turn up quite often in Jewish legends. The most famous tale is called The Golem Of Prague and involves a rabbi called Judah Loew Ben Bezalel who brings to life a clay man to defend the Jewish ghetto in Prague against oppression. In 1915 Paul Wegener wrote, directed and starred in The Golem, both a modern day adaptation of the story and a kind of sequel where it’s made clear that the Golem is the same one that Rabbi Loew brought to life four centuries before. Sadly both it and a comedic semi-sequel called The Golem And The Dancing Girl seem to be lost [though fragments survive of the former]. Wegener felt budget restrictions meant that his 1915 version didn’t meet his expectations, so he decided to have another go at the story, this time setting it in the 16th century and retelling it more faithfully, though are so many variants of this particular tale anyway. It did well both in Germany and overseas, and was remade in France as Le Golem in 1935.

Now one of the most difficult things to get one’s head round involving silent films is running times. The DVD of The Golem I purchased very cheaply last week runs 64 min, which seems quite short. Movies were randomly hacked about in the silent days far more than they are now. However, a cursory bit of research reveals that Starlight Digital’s DVD is probably not missing very much, in fact it may even be complete. Longer versions exist on DVD, but this seems to be because silent pictures were and are often projected at different speeds. The tendency in the silent days was to project them fast, but to modern eyes this often seems unnatural and even annoying, so they are often slowed down. The version of The Golem I have is a little speeded up, but in a very stylised picture like this it doesn’t seem to matter so much. You can pick up the Starlight Digital DVD for a two or three pounds and it is worth every penny. More silent films like this should be available on the cheaper labels as many of them are public domain.

The Golem opens with the words “the learned rabbi reads in the stars that misfortune will befall the Jews”, and this film really reminds us throughout of the fact that the Jews were persecuted all through history and not just by the Nazis; the Holocaust was just the most extreme example. The Jews are portrayed in a rather ‘exotic’ way in this movie, though that was the norm for most non-white cultures at the time it was made, and the Christians are not portrayed in the best light either. The film actually seems to be detailing a very extreme sect of Judaism like kabballah with its black magic and mysticism. The Golem is brought to life when the rabbi, who is also a magician, has to summon the demon Astaroth. He first conjures up first smoke with flaming brands flying around, then a large demonic head looms [the bloody thing almost made me jump], and the goblin-like features are quite scary. The head spits out smoke which form the letters comprising the word that will bring the Golem to life. This really vivid sequence is immensely effective, but almost as interesting is one that follows soon after when Leow visits the Emperor’s court and, saying he will show his people to all those there, conjures up a kind of huge TV screen. The Golem himself though is perhaps a little laughable to modern eyes. Though he looks imposing and actor Paul Wegener shows an ability to make his face look really twisted and evil at choice moments, his walk has a tendency to become a funny slow scurry and he never really looks like he is actually made out of clay.

Never mind, the sets are superbly dreamlike in design, mixing the medieval and the surreal in a really creative but very cohesive way. Buildings are misshapen, doors and bridges etc seem to exist at odd angles, yet this also feels, oddly, a very real and convincing world. Karl Freund’s cinematography uses darkness with amazing creativity. Unless you watch one of the tinted versions, this is a black and white film, and yet after a few minutes you won’t miss colour at all, so well thought out are all the shots. There’s a quick love story which is intriguing not just because you actually see them in bed together but because the man looks very much like a woman! Florian initially seems like he’s gay, prancing about and waving a flower around, but when he’s with Miriam in close-up he looks distinctly feminine with all his make-up, something which gives the moment when he places his hand on her breast a rather more erotic charge [if you’re male] than was probably intended. Not much time is spent on this though, and once the Golem is alive he’s rarely off screen. Of course you just know he’s going to go out of control, and the images and plotting become increasingly familiar because we’ve all seen so many films re-using it, with Frankenstein especially borrowing from it, even the final scene which involves a very poetic meeting between the Golem and a little girl.

This print suffers greatly from its music score, which strings together and repeats bits of classical music without thinking whether it’s appropriate for what is occurring at that time. Quiet music sometimes accompanies exciting scenes, and vice verse. The great conjuring of Astaroth scene has lush, melodic music, and I think this film would be more enjoyable if you turned the sound off and maybe put your own music on. Only the use of Holst’s Mars from The Planets really suits the tone and visuals, though it’s repeated endlessly in the second half. The performances are as melodramatic as they come, but that’s often the way it is with silent films. Certainly a minor classic, The Golem remains an important picture in the history of the horror film and quite an entertaining and certainly exciting watch, even if you’re not too partial to silent films. And The Golem himself remains a strong symbol of how a group of people can achieve power to overcome injustices that are done against them and turn that power into something that is damaging for themselves.

Rating: 7.5/10

_____________________________

check out more of my reviews on http://horrorcultfilms.co.uk/

(in reply to evil bill)
Post #: 15033
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 25/7/2013 6:55:15 PM   
Dr Lenera

 

Posts: 3980
Joined: 19/10/2005

Dr. Elson Po is a world famous wine maker, people paying up to $50,000 a bottle. He is actually several centuries old but drinks a magic potion which keeps him alive and restores some of his youth. Unfortunately he needs human bodies to make the potion from. He invites Jezebel, an actress, to his island to shoot a film, saying she can bring some friends with her. He throws a party for them all, but one of the guests, Jeremy, is convinced that there is something strange about Po, and another, Nancy, spots a corpse buried in the vineyard sticking out of the ground with his head and hand showing….

I used to be a total video freak, and during my long period of unemployment I would constantly be hiring videos. When I had gone through all the films of interest, which would include most of the horror films, in my local shop, I didn’t worry, because there were three others nearby. One film I distinctly remember picking up quite a few times, but never actually hiring, was The Vineyard. I suppose the problem was I had limited funds so some videos always ended up back on the shelf. Well hurray, I’ve finally got to see The Vineyard courtesy of Arrow films, and it’s an unashamedly trashy horror flick which absolutely screams the ‘80’s. It’s a bit of a mess to be honest, but that doesn’t really matter too much when the film obviously isn’t intended to be taken seriously. It’s not an out-and out comedy, but any film which boasts exchanges like the following clearly has some of its tongue in its cheek.

I hate to tell you but there’s no string for that bow
I know that Nancy, I know that. Why do you think I haven’t fired it yet?


The main reason I think The Vineyard has reached cult status is that it gives James Hong a rare starring role. He is well known to film fans for memorable appearances in films like Big Trouble In Little China, Blade Runner and Chinatown. Most of his 500 film and TV roles are small but usually of note and certainly of great variety even if there’s never any mistaking his distinct voice. Even in his 80’s his career is still going strong, a career which began with dubbing characters in Asian movies , most notably the two main leads [well, the human ones] in Godzilla, King of The Monsters, the US re-cut of Godzilla. Dr. Elson Po is a part which is perfect for Hong. The guy is, to put it bluntly, a truly evil bastard, albeit one with torment and pain inside him, and doesn’t even seem to be a nice guy to work for considering the way he bosses his assistants about. A magician, he’s able to kill from a great distance with ease, and Hong suggests the frightening power of this character very well, as well as somehow making it believable that he is hundreds of years old.

Now Hong also co-wrote and directed this film, which is probably why right at the beginning, the sixty year old actor has a love scene with a woman a third of his age. Typical movie sexism maybe, but it I was directing a film I was in and I was that age, I might very well do the same. In any case, he is also shown to periodically age several hundred years, much like The Man Who Could Cheat Death [which seems to have informed this film in a few ways], Countess Dracula, and many other foolish but rather tragic characters who are able to keep themselves young, but have to take lives in order to do it. Po keeps a load of people chained in the basement so he can come and take their blood to use for his rejuvenating potion, but there are also a load of zombies buried in the earth, corpses that are still moving and that you just know are going to eventually rise up out of the ground. I think the idea is that once Po has taken all the blood he can from someone, that person is buried, and this fertilises the vineyard, but why still alive? The zombies actually feature in few scenes, but their resurrection is quite atmospheric. Sadly, they sport make-up which looks very rushed, and in fact Hong’s make-up for when he is really old is unconvincing and almost laughable, though I suppose we don’t know entirely what a 300 year old-plus gentleman who hasn’t been buried looks like.

The film very quickly manoeuvres its young victims-to-be into the place where they will be in danger, and we have already seen Po take a brutal revenge on a guy messing with his girlfriend. The pacing is really fast here, though the downfall of course is that we don’t really get to know any of these people very well. There’s an odd party scene where Po and his assistants wear Chinese ceremonial masks to receive their guests and Po prances about dancing weirdly, then we get into the horror [well, I say horror, but this isn’t a scary film really and doesn’t seem much like it’s trying to be one]. The guests start to be killed off in some quite unusual ways which show some invention at work, Po’s magic enabling him to make spiders [a good Deadly Blessing moment here] and flies go all over someone’s face, or needles go through a neck. There’s a bit of gore [though not really enough to warrant an '18'rating these days], quite a bit of violent fighting, a rather prettily flashback, and some random additions to the story including an old woman locked in a room to keep the film from ever getting dull, but it ends up being more about reincarnation than anything else, and actually ends up being remarkably similar to the 1932 The Mummy. Then again, I couldn’t stop thinking of Big Trouble In Little China either, right down to a girl who looks very much like Kim Cattrall.

It’s all rather confused, and attempts to explain matters, plus at least one daft revelation that makes no sense at all, usually just cause more confusion. While overall the script is not really a good job, it does attempt to bring in elements of Chinese culture which are not often seen in films of this type, while Po’s laboratory is a strange and interesting mixture of the old and the new, with things like a Chinese statue in amongst all the typical stuff you would expect to see. Effort has been made to make the island setting quite beautiful, courtesy of John Dirlam’s rather lush photography. Then there’s Paul Francis Witt’s music, which alternates typical moody synthesiser doodling with some of the cheesiest 80’s style rock music you’ll ever likely to hear. The acting except for Hong, is poor, though the dialogue often isn’t much cop either, and I lost count of the number of times “Jezebel” was said.

As you may have realised, The Vineyard is not a good film, its biggest problem I think stemming from the fact that in starring, directing and so-writing, Hong seems to have taken on too much, and that’s he’s only really good at one of the three jobs he gave himself. His other directorial credits are an ‘erotic’ thriller and a sex comedy, so I think it’s safe to say that he’s not much of a film-maker. Yet, despite its many flaws, I still rather enjoyed The Vineyard, as one can enjoy bad movies, and much as I like this kind of film, it is a bad movie really. But it’s certainly a fun one, and a fun bad movie is often worth two dull good ones in my book. I recommend that you buy one or even two bottles of really cheap vino to enjoy with it.

Rating: 5/10

_____________________________

check out more of my reviews on http://horrorcultfilms.co.uk/

(in reply to Dr Lenera)
Post #: 15034
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 25/7/2013 8:08:32 PM   
evil bill


Posts: 6721
Joined: 19/7/2006
From: mordor/ uk
quote:

ORIGINAL: Dr Lenera

And there was me thinking me having bought Suspiria four times was excessive..........

Anyway, don't need to ask if you've seen these two Bill.






This print suffers greatly from its music score, which strings together and repeats bits of classical music without thinking whether it's appropriate for what is occurring at that time. Quiet music sometimes accompanies exciting scenes, and vice verse. The great conjuring of Astaroth scene has lush, melodic music, and I think this film would be more enjoyable if you turned the sound off and maybe put your own music on. Only the use of Holst's Mars from The Planets really suits the tone and visuals, though it's repeated endlessly in the second half. The performances are as melodramatic as they come, but that's often the way it is with silent films. Certainly a minor classic, The Golem remains an important picture in the history of the horror film and quite an entertaining and certainly exciting watch, even if you're not too partial to silent films. And The Golem himself remains a strong symbol of how a group of people can achieve power to overcome injustices that are done against them and turn that power into something that is damaging for themselves.

Rating: 7.5/10

Yes I've seen this one, I think it was on Channel4 as part of a Silent Film season, and I have to say I loved the story more than the visuals, but it is up there with my favourite Silent Horror films. Lon Chaney's films are the best number one being Phantom Of The Opera 1925, but then I am a big fan of Gothic horror as you know, and just wish more people gave Silent films a chance. Great review again mate.
quote:


 
As you may have realised, The Vineyard is not a good film, its biggest problem I think stemming from the fact that in starring, directing and so-writing, Hong seems to have taken on too much, and that’s he’s only really good at one of the three jobs he gave himself. His other directorial credits are an ‘erotic’ thriller and a sex comedy, so I think it’s safe to say that he’s not much of a film-maker. Yet, despite its many flaws, I still rather enjoyed The Vineyard, as one can enjoy bad movies, and much as I like this kind of film, it is a bad movie really. But it’s certainly a fun one, and a fun bad movie is often worth two dull good ones in my book. I recommend that you buy one or even two bottles of really cheap vino to enjoy with it.

Rating: 5/10

Now this i'm not sure of I recognise the pictures but can't remember the film too well, must have seen it during a drink fuelled night with the mates.

_____________________________

"You listen to me now,i will find you and i will kill you!"

(in reply to Dr Lenera)
Post #: 15035
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 30/7/2013 10:42:13 AM   
Dr Lenera

 

Posts: 3980
Joined: 19/10/2005

quote:

ORIGINAL: evil bill

quote:

ORIGINAL: Dr Lenera

And there was me thinking me having bought Suspiria four times was excessive..........

Anyway, don't need to ask if you've seen these two Bill.






This print suffers greatly from its music score, which strings together and repeats bits of classical music without thinking whether it's appropriate for what is occurring at that time. Quiet music sometimes accompanies exciting scenes, and vice verse. The great conjuring of Astaroth scene has lush, melodic music, and I think this film would be more enjoyable if you turned the sound off and maybe put your own music on. Only the use of Holst's Mars from The Planets really suits the tone and visuals, though it's repeated endlessly in the second half. The performances are as melodramatic as they come, but that's often the way it is with silent films. Certainly a minor classic, The Golem remains an important picture in the history of the horror film and quite an entertaining and certainly exciting watch, even if you're not too partial to silent films. And The Golem himself remains a strong symbol of how a group of people can achieve power to overcome injustices that are done against them and turn that power into something that is damaging for themselves.

Rating: 7.5/10

Yes I've seen this one, I think it was on Channel4 as part of a Silent Film season, and I have to say I loved the story more than the visuals, but it is up there with my favourite Silent Horror films. Lon Chaney's films are the best number one being Phantom Of The Opera 1925, but then I am a big fan of Gothic horror as you know, and just wish more people gave Silent films a chance. Great review again mate.
quote:


 
As you may have realised, The Vineyard is not a good film, its biggest problem I think stemming from the fact that in starring, directing and so-writing, Hong seems to have taken on too much, and that’s he’s only really good at one of the three jobs he gave himself. His other directorial credits are an ‘erotic’ thriller and a sex comedy, so I think it’s safe to say that he’s not much of a film-maker. Yet, despite its many flaws, I still rather enjoyed The Vineyard, as one can enjoy bad movies, and much as I like this kind of film, it is a bad movie really. But it’s certainly a fun one, and a fun bad movie is often worth two dull good ones in my book. I recommend that you buy one or even two bottles of really cheap vino to enjoy with it.

Rating: 5/10

Now this i'm not sure of I recognise the pictures but can't remember the film too well, must have seen it during a drink fuelled night with the mates.


Ha ha same as, I know what you mean, back in the late 80's/early 90's there must have been quite a few horrors etc that I watched but now have little recollection of because of my, um, state at the time!!


_____________________________

check out more of my reviews on http://horrorcultfilms.co.uk/

(in reply to evil bill)
Post #: 15036
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 30/7/2013 7:30:18 PM   
evil bill


Posts: 6721
Joined: 19/7/2006
From: mordor/ uk
Well folks got to see MANIAC 2012 at last, also watched Bullet To The Head, with Sly Stallone which was entertaining with a good body count, felt like a sort of Grindhouse cop revenge flick, in fact a real 80's throw back, a lot of the scenes where stolen from old 80's action films, but worth watching for the fun factor. Now lets talk:
MANIAC 2012

Just when the streets seemed safe, a serial killer with a fetish for scalps is back and on the hunt. Frank (Elijah Wood) is the withdrawn owner of a mannequin store, but his life changes when young artist Anna (Nora Arnezeder) appears asking for his help with her new exhibition. As their friendship develops and Frank's obsession escalates, it becomes clear that she has unleashed a long-repressed compulsion to stalk and kill.

Most will se this film as a 21st century re boot of Jack the Ripper story,set in present day LA, but in fact Franck Khalfoun's Maniac is a re-boot of the William Lustig cult film. Which I consider to be one of the most suspenseful disturbing slasher films ever made. A real hard act to follow but the good news is on the whole we still get an intimate, visually daring, psychologically complex and horrific trip into the downward spiral of a killer's twisted mind.Khalfoun with the help of the producers of  The Hills Have Eyes remake, gives us an unflinchingly brutal film that has that Neon modern lit look of Drive, and also places the viewer in the role of accomplice with the viewer seeing through the killers eyes right from the start. The violence when unleashed is disturbingly effective, but for all this it never beats the original for it's far darker feel, and the air of menace that leaves you chilled to the bone.

Now the main problem is the killer, when we finally get to see him Mr Wood, well he's just not threating in looks or even chilling in manner, now don't get me wrong, I was highly impressed by Elijah Wood in Sin City, his cold calculated cannibalistic killer portrayal was awesome and weird. Here he looks like he's wandered on to the wrong film set, maybe this is due to the lack of real screen time, but I feel he lacks that something the great bad guys of the big screen have. It's all in the eyes folks, that piercing chilling evil look that makes you want to run, and scream out "run for your life or your in a body bag". In Sin City we never get a real look at the killers eyes,and the great CGI and use of colour covered up and short falls in Wood's boyish looks, here he has the boyish in fact sheepish look that would not scare a baby. Sorry it was bad casting, and a script that steals a lot from the original but never delivers the shocks that so marked the original as a Slasher classic.

Now overall it is a decent remake, and has enough gore to keep us fans of slasher/splatter films happy, and looks real slick, well produced and directed, it also moves a good pace never forgetting it is a horror film, which is a bonus, as so many try to inject comedy at the wrong moments. It is also well acted by all the cast, and though Elijah Wood is wrongly cast, he makes a valiant effort to portray a man struggling with inner demons, who in the end is not just a mindless killer, but far worse a deranged psycho with a twisted view of the world around him. I liked the way it also pays homage to the original, which is very evident in the opening titles and song, but all the talk of it being one of the great remakes of are time, well no, but it is a good remake, that comes close to the deranged terror of the 80's classic. But in the end even with a second watch i'll be re watching the William Lustig cult classic, for it still stands out as one of the greatest slashers of all time, and yet I feel like the killer's split personality. There's a lot to like about the film, and if you have not seen the 80's classic version, this will be a real cool slasher to watch, if like me you have seen, then you'll struggle to score it highly, so to be fair I started at ten then deducted it's weak points.7/10

< Message edited by evil bill -- 30/7/2013 7:31:02 PM >


_____________________________

"You listen to me now,i will find you and i will kill you!"

(in reply to evil bill)
Post #: 15037
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 30/7/2013 8:49:09 PM   
dannyfletch


Posts: 645
Joined: 25/5/2008
From: Bromley
Actually in real life a lot of killers don't come across or look like killers so was it a bad choice to cast Elijah Wood in the main role of Maniac or was it actually a more realistic approach rather then cast the same old actors who play bad guys, i.e your Mark Strong's or your Javier Bardem's???

(in reply to evil bill)
Post #: 15038
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 31/7/2013 4:18:50 PM   
evil bill


Posts: 6721
Joined: 19/7/2006
From: mordor/ uk
quote:

ORIGINAL: dannyfletch

Actually in real life a lot of killers don't come across or look like killers so was it a bad choice to cast Elijah Wood in the main role of Maniac or was it actually a more realistic approach rather then cast the same old actors who play bad guys, i.e your Mark Strong's or your Javier Bardem's???

Yes I see your point, but I still feel he was just not in the right role, though I did think he gave it his all, maybe he'd be better in a PSYCHO remake, he's more like Perkin's, and would work in a role like that.


_____________________________

"You listen to me now,i will find you and i will kill you!"

(in reply to dannyfletch)
Post #: 15039
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 31/7/2013 5:17:48 PM   
Dr Lenera

 

Posts: 3980
Joined: 19/10/2005

quote:

ORIGINAL: evil bill

Well folks got to see MANIAC 2012 at last, also watched Bullet To The Head, with Sly Stallone which was entertaining with a good body count, felt like a sort of Grindhouse cop revenge flick, in fact a real 80's throw back, a lot of the scenes where stolen from old 80's action films, but worth watching for the fun factor. Now lets talk:
MANIAC 2012

Just when the streets seemed safe, a serial killer with a fetish for scalps is back and on the hunt. Frank (Elijah Wood) is the withdrawn owner of a mannequin store, but his life changes when young artist Anna (Nora Arnezeder) appears asking for his help with her new exhibition. As their friendship develops and Frank's obsession escalates, it becomes clear that she has unleashed a long-repressed compulsion to stalk and kill.

Most will se this film as a 21st century re boot of Jack the Ripper story,set in present day LA, but in fact Franck Khalfoun's Maniac is a re-boot of the William Lustig cult film. Which I consider to be one of the most suspenseful disturbing slasher films ever made. A real hard act to follow but the good news is on the whole we still get an intimate, visually daring, psychologically complex and horrific trip into the downward spiral of a killer's twisted mind.Khalfoun with the help of the producers of  The Hills Have Eyes remake, gives us an unflinchingly brutal film that has that Neon modern lit look of Drive, and also places the viewer in the role of accomplice with the viewer seeing through the killers eyes right from the start. The violence when unleashed is disturbingly effective, but for all this it never beats the original for it's far darker feel, and the air of menace that leaves you chilled to the bone.

Now the main problem is the killer, when we finally get to see him Mr Wood, well he's just not threating in looks or even chilling in manner, now don't get me wrong, I was highly impressed by Elijah Wood in Sin City, his cold calculated cannibalistic killer portrayal was awesome and weird. Here he looks like he's wandered on to the wrong film set, maybe this is due to the lack of real screen time, but I feel he lacks that something the great bad guys of the big screen have. It's all in the eyes folks, that piercing chilling evil look that makes you want to run, and scream out "run for your life or your in a body bag". In Sin City we never get a real look at the killers eyes,and the great CGI and use of colour covered up and short falls in Wood's boyish looks, here he has the boyish in fact sheepish look that would not scare a baby. Sorry it was bad casting, and a script that steals a lot from the original but never delivers the shocks that so marked the original as a Slasher classic.

Now overall it is a decent remake, and has enough gore to keep us fans of slasher/splatter films happy, and looks real slick, well produced and directed, it also moves a good pace never forgetting it is a horror film, which is a bonus, as so many try to inject comedy at the wrong moments. It is also well acted by all the cast, and though Elijah Wood is wrongly cast, he makes a valiant effort to portray a man struggling with inner demons, who in the end is not just a mindless killer, but far worse a deranged psycho with a twisted view of the world around him. I liked the way it also pays homage to the original, which is very evident in the opening titles and song, but all the talk of it being one of the great remakes of are time, well no, but it is a good remake, that comes close to the deranged terror of the 80's classic. But in the end even with a second watch i'll be re watching the William Lustig cult classic, for it still stands out as one of the greatest slashers of all time, and yet I feel like the killer's split personality. There's a lot to like about the film, and if you have not seen the 80's classic version, this will be a real cool slasher to watch, if like me you have seen, then you'll struggle to score it highly, so to be fair I started at ten then deducted it's weak points.7/10


Now this I still haven't seen, I have a feeling I'll agree with you on this like I did with I Spit On Your Grave and Evil Dead, decent, but falling short of the original. Did you know it's just been banned in New Zealand?!

_____________________________

check out more of my reviews on http://horrorcultfilms.co.uk/

(in reply to evil bill)
Post #: 15040
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 31/7/2013 6:03:57 PM   
paul.mccluskey


Posts: 5159
Joined: 15/4/2007
From: Port Glasgow, Scotland, UK
Seen a couple of movies over the past few weeks while I was on holiday. Managed to catch World War Z at the cinema. I'm aware that the film is nothing like the book, but I found it compelling, even though it lacked intelligent social commentary. It was funny to see Glasgow substituting for Philadelphia, I remember being in Glasgow one night and seeing the set.

Also watched The Crazies. I'm sorry to admit, but I prefer the remake. George A. Romero's film got lost in its own ideas, and wasn't as thrilling or smart as his Dead series.

(in reply to Dr Lenera)
Post #: 15041
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 31/7/2013 7:28:19 PM   
evil bill


Posts: 6721
Joined: 19/7/2006
From: mordor/ uk
quote:

ORIGINAL: Dr Lenera


quote:

ORIGINAL: evil bill

Well folks got to see MANIAC 2012 at last, also watched Bullet To The Head, with Sly Stallone which was entertaining with a good body count, felt like a sort of Grindhouse cop revenge flick, in fact a real 80's throw back, a lot of the scenes where stolen from old 80's action films, but worth watching for the fun factor. Now lets talk:
MANIAC 2012


Now overall it is a decent remake, and has enough gore to keep us fans of slasher/splatter films happy, and looks real slick, well produced and directed, it also moves a good pace never forgetting it is a horror film, which is a bonus, as so many try to inject comedy at the wrong moments. It is also well acted by all the cast, and though Elijah Wood is wrongly cast, he makes a valiant effort to portray a man struggling with inner demons, who in the end is not just a mindless killer, but far worse a deranged psycho with a twisted view of the world around him. I liked the way it also pays homage to the original, which is very evident in the opening titles and song, but all the talk of it being one of the great remakes of are time, well no, but it is a good remake, that comes close to the deranged terror of the 80's classic. But in the end even with a second watch i'll be re watching the William Lustig cult classic, for it still stands out as one of the greatest slashers of all time, and yet I feel like the killer's split personality. There's a lot to like about the film, and if you have not seen the 80's classic version, this will be a real cool slasher to watch, if like me you have seen, then you'll struggle to score it highly, so to be fair I started at ten then deducted it's weak points.7/10


Now this I still haven't seen, I have a feeling I'll agree with you on this like I did with I Spit On Your Grave and Evil Dead, decent, but falling short of the original. Did you know it's just been banned in New Zealand?!

It's worth the rental, even though it falls short of the original, and no I didn't know it was banned in NZ, though I do know it has caused the Violence against women debate to rear up it's ugly head again. But then with so many slasher films being re made this is no surprise, as the blood and violence is toned down very little in most, and the sex turned up.

_____________________________

"You listen to me now,i will find you and i will kill you!"

(in reply to Dr Lenera)
Post #: 15042
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 31/7/2013 7:42:37 PM   
evil bill


Posts: 6721
Joined: 19/7/2006
From: mordor/ uk
quote:

ORIGINAL: paul.mccluskey

Seen a couple of movies over the past few weeks while I was on holiday. Managed to catch World War Z at the cinema. I'm aware that the film is nothing like the book, but I found it compelling, even though it lacked intelligent social commentary. It was funny to see Glasgow substituting for Philadelphia, I remember being in Glasgow one night and seeing the set.

Also watched The Crazies. I'm sorry to admit, but I prefer the remake. George A. Romero's film got lost in its own ideas, and wasn't as thrilling or smart as his Dead series.

Belfast on a weekend night is full of Zombies.
The Crazies 2010 I found petty decent with great production, and yes well scripted, but I still prefer George Romero's film, it made me jump a couple of times, and for it's time was pretty violent.

_____________________________

"You listen to me now,i will find you and i will kill you!"

(in reply to paul.mccluskey)
Post #: 15043
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 1/8/2013 8:54:37 PM   
Dr Lenera

 

Posts: 3980
Joined: 19/10/2005

The Ulam tribe are early humans who who possess fire in the form of a carefully guarded small flame which they use to start larger bonfires. Obtained from a natural source, the flame is kept in a makeshift bone satchel and must be fed constantly to keep it alive because the Ulam don’t know how to start a fire. Driven out of their home after a bloody battle with the apelike Wagabu, some Ulam survive to escape but are chased into a marsh by a pack of wolves. The Ulam’s fire tender escapes with the tribe’s remaining fire; however, while crossing a marsh, he all but douses the embers, leaving the tribe doomed to die from exposure and starvation. The Ulam elder decides to send three men on a quest to find fire….

There haven’t been very many films about primitive man, or at least films which have reached a wide audience [one day I might rave on this site about Ten Canoes and even defend The Clan Of The Cave Bear, but that is, as they say, for another day]. I reckon most people, on thinking of cinematic descriptions of our distant ancestors, would either think of the very disappointing 10 000 BC from a few years back, the Dawn Of Man section from 2001: A Space Odyssey or Rachel Welch being carried off by a Pteranodon in One Million Years B.C. In 1981, two very different caveman pictures were released to cinemas which found decent audiences and are still sometimes mentioned today. One was Caveman, a wonderfully stupid comedy where Dennis Quaid pees ice and a dinosaur gets stoned when eating a plant. The other, and much better known, was the French-Canadian production Quest For Fire, a film I never got around to seeing, yet a film which, as I watched it, I realised has actually seeped into popular culture quite a bit, from Family Guy to an Iron Maiden song. There’s even a Jackie Chan film, Operation Condor: Armour Of God 2, where Chan is chased by people looking just like one of the tribes in Quest For Fire [the masks look exactly the same].

It was directed by Jean-Jacques Annaud, a filmmaker who, from Enemy At The Gates to Two Brothers, has a knack for immersing the viewer in an environment with a feeling of great realism while still making something that is great to look at. One day I’ll write for this website a review of his hugely underrated 1986 film The Name Of The Rose, a great picture which is worth ten Da Vinci Codes. Quest For Fire was an adaptation of a 1911 novel, and actually certain details can be found to be inaccurate if you’re so inclined. The important thing was that the movie gave the impression of realism, and for that effect Annaud got Anthony Burgess [no stranger at this sort of thing, as fans of A Clockwork Orange will know] to create the language of the Ulam, who are what we now call Neanderthal Man, and zoologist Desmond Morris to create their body languages and gestures. The more advanced Ivaka actually speak Cree Indian, though Crees viewing the film apparently found it both amusing and confusing to watch a film where some of the characters were saying things which made no sense in the context of what was going on. The film was apparently hell to make, with cast members having to endure five hour make-up sessions every morning, ran barefoot through forests and over volcanic rocks, trudge through near-freezing lakes with leeches, and fight real animals. But it was worth it.

Quest For Fire should immediate immerse the viewer in its world, or at least a viewer who doesn’t need everything simplified. I reckon that this film would have trouble getting a decent release in US and UK cinemas if it were made today, or at least in its original form. I can imagine studio executives fretting about the fact that nobody speaks English, or that the Ulam male’s way of choosing a mate is to grab the nearest female and insert himself into her whether she likes it or not, or whether a narration should be put in to make it clearer what was going on. Quest For Fire seems to have had no studio interference whatsoever [though the director’s first cut was four hours long and if it’s ever released I want to see it] and is so much the better for it. Though it does turn into a somewhat familiar quest story, it mostly refuses to compromise. Despite this, what I expected to be a fascinating but somewhat cold and distant viewing experience became more and more immersive. Small factual mistakes aside, I felt I really was in the world of the very first humans.

The intelligence of this film is clear from the first few minutes, when we first meet the Ulams. It almost feels like a documentary as the camera observes these creatures, one third ape, two thirds man, in their everyday existence, and it’s a dirty and rough one. Then suddenly they are attacked by Wagabu. They are more two thirds ape, one third man, and cannibals into the bargain. The ensuring battle is pretty brutal with some gruesome details as a spear going through a mouth and hands and heads bashed in with rocks. The UK cinema release was cut slightly to get an ‘AA’ [equivalent to the ‘15’ we have now] rating, and slightly more to retain the rating on video, mostly losing a rape which was probably considered problematic because one of the heroes commits the act and the victim seems pleased after it has occurred, though the scene perfectly illustrates how different values are in the world of the film, or at least amongst the Ulams. The rapist has no idea he’s doing something wrong, because that’s how mating happens in his tribe. The victim comes from a tribe which is more advanced and civilised and probably realises her attacker doesn’t mean to do wrong. Throughout, Quest For Fire is bloody and sexually frank, but not in a gratuitous way, while technically it holds up except for the masks of the Wagabu, which don’t look very flexible. Today, the scenes of fire and the mastodons, which are elephants with lots of hair on, would probably be accomplished with CGI, but I doubt would look as good.

The three main characters are constantly filmed being dwarved by the rugged [this film was filmed in Canada, Iceland, Kenya and Scotland] locations lensed evocatively by cinematographer Claude Agostini as they proceed on their quest. There is a great deal of action, not just involving humans/ near-humans, and even some humour. At one point the three are so scared by two lions that they spend two days and one night up a tree [I guess relieving themselves wasn’t a problem] until a branch one is on falls to the ground. One of the themes of the film is learning. We see the evolving of language, the birth of humour, compassion, the missionary position, and others. A romantic element is somewhat forced and it’s silly that all this development happens so quickly. There is something life-affirming though in seeing traits which seem second-nature to us being virtually born on screen. The actors, who include Ron Perlman in his first ever role and a sadly unrecognisable, though usually naked, Rae Dawn Chong, play their parts with such eloquence that after a while I didn’t miss hearing the English language one bit. Everett McGill has a fantastic moment when he witnesses the creation of fire. The look of awe on his face belongs in a Steven Spielberg film.

The proceedings are enhanced immensely by the diverse music score by Philip Sarde, which often cleverly conveys primitivism with very complex orchestral writing. The almost religious-sounding chorale cues for the scenes involving fire are especially effective in invoking the emotions of the characters who are witnessing what is basically their god. Quest For Fire has its aspects which feel contrived but they mostly feel that way as I write this review, not during the actual film. Unusual yet still entertaining and never dull, it’s quite a unique experience, raw and savage, but captivating and oddly uplifting.

8/10

_____________________________

check out more of my reviews on http://horrorcultfilms.co.uk/

(in reply to evil bill)
Post #: 15044
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 1/8/2013 9:45:19 PM   
Mister Coe

 

Posts: 1561
Joined: 20/10/2012
OK, so where to you fellow lovers of WEIRD / STRANGE movies stand on GWENDOLINE?

This was a video favourite of mine back in the 80's, mainly because Tawny Kitaen, who I had a bit of a thing for after all those Whitesnake videos, got all nudey and I was an impressionable young boy.  Don't judge me! 

Just got delivery of an uncut copy, apparently with nearly four minutes of cuts restored (was the original movie that shocking?), haven't got time to watch it tonight but will do so tomorrow... Dr L and Evil Bill (or anyone else who remembers this flick), whaddya reckon?

Here's the trailer if you need a reminder...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DaEMk3lyFdw

_____________________________

Say what now?

(in reply to Dr Lenera)
Post #: 15045
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 2/8/2013 11:46:45 AM   
evil bill


Posts: 6721
Joined: 19/7/2006
From: mordor/ uk
quote:

ORIGINAL: Mister Coe

OK, so where to you fellow lovers of WEIRD / STRANGE movies stand on GWENDOLINE?

This was a video favourite of mine back in the 80's, mainly because Tawny Kitaen, who I had a bit of a thing for after all those Whitesnake videos, got all nudey and I was an impressionable young boy.  Don't judge me! 

Just got delivery of an uncut copy, apparently with nearly four minutes of cuts restored (was the original movie that shocking?), haven't got time to watch it tonight but will do so tomorrow... Dr L and Evil Bill (or anyone else who remembers this flick), whaddya reckon?

Here's the trailer if you need a reminder...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DaEMk3lyFdw

Wow!!! well done another film i'd forgotten about, this erotic/Sci/Fi film, Jaeckin  director of films like Emmanuelle, and Lady Chatterley's Lover full of enough female nudity and fetish imagery to satisfy the most demanding of lovers of films like Barbed wire ,Flesh Gordon and Baberalla. This is one, way out of this world cult fantasy films, with yes Tawny Kitaen once married to David Coverdale(Whitesnake, Deep Purple) who starred in Bachelor Party and those legendary Whitesnake music videos in the lead role, heres a quick word on the story, as if you care;

When sweet,sexy and innocent Gwendoline travels as a stowaway to the Far East with her sexy friend Beth (played by French actress and model Zabou) on a mission to track down her father, who has mysteriously disappeared whilst on a mission to find a mythical butterfly. They are captured by a group of lecherous seamen, but luckly rescued by the hunky adventurer Willard (actor and male model Brent Huff), Gwendoline persuades him to make up their trio and embark on a daring journey to the land of the Yek Yeik, a country ruled by a diabolical dominant Amazon queen and army of female fetish-clad Amazonian warriors!(Ohhh i'm breaking into a sweat just thinking of them.) There, Gwendoline must defeat the evil queen and prevent Wilard from being forced to spawn a new race of female warriors or face certain death.

Gwendoline 1984 like Baberalla 1960 is a bizarre erotic comic adventure adapted from John Willie's acclaimed erotic comic strip of the same name, and once seen you'll never forget this one. Now as far as I know or remember it was more Flesh Gordon to be honest, and the cuts made where for the sex scenes, though more soft porn than some story's made it out to be.Worth the watch, in fact I see I can get it on DVD for a decent price, so it's time to get this one added to my collection, thanks for the trailer, and reminding me of this cult classic, well more guilty pleasure to be honest.

< Message edited by evil bill -- 2/8/2013 11:55:13 AM >


_____________________________

"You listen to me now,i will find you and i will kill you!"

(in reply to Mister Coe)
Post #: 15046
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 2/8/2013 12:03:01 PM   
evil bill


Posts: 6721
Joined: 19/7/2006
From: mordor/ uk
quote:

ORIGINAL: Dr Lenera


The Ulam tribe are early humans who who possess fire in the form of a carefully guarded small flame which they use to start larger bonfires. Obtained from a natural source, the flame is kept in a makeshift bone satchel and must be fed constantly to keep it alive because the Ulam don't know how to start a fire. Driven out of their home after a bloody battle with the apelike Wagabu, some Ulam survive to escape but are chased into a marsh by a pack of wolves. The Ulam's fire tender escapes with the tribe's remaining fire; however, while crossing a marsh, he all but douses the embers, leaving the tribe doomed to die from exposure and starvation. The Ulam elder decides to send three men on a quest to find fire….



The proceedings are enhanced immensely by the diverse music score by Philip Sarde, which often cleverly conveys primitivism with very complex orchestral writing. The almost religious-sounding chorale cues for the scenes involving fire are especially effective in invoking the emotions of the characters who are witnessing what is basically their god. Quest For Fire has its aspects which feel contrived but they mostly feel that way as I write this review, not during the actual film. Unusual yet still entertaining and never dull, it's quite a unique experience, raw and savage, but captivating and oddly uplifting.

8/10

Good God!!! another mad Sci/Fi film from my past, has come back to hunt me from the 80's, and what a review, we two need locked away, we seem to have watched every crazy film you can name. Totally agree mate a great film that shows how well you can make a film without CGI, and yet every bloody film is now awash with CGI, just to get bums on seats, along with the not so good 3D gimmick, that no body seems to be able to do without.

_____________________________

"You listen to me now,i will find you and i will kill you!"

(in reply to Dr Lenera)
Post #: 15047
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 2/8/2013 1:03:07 PM   
losthighway


Posts: 3248
Joined: 25/1/2006
From: Manchesterford
There are very few true psychopaths in the world as they have to meet a specific criteria. I've worked with a guy who hit 4 out of the (if I recall correctly!?) 5 points of psychopathy, plus other people diagnosed with personality disorder and trust me Elijah Wood wasn't miscast at all imho. As for the film, I've got the BR but haven't rewatched it as yet... I recall being slightly disappointed by it at the cinema but at the same time impressed by its photography and score. It's £5 on DVD at Sainsburys at the minute so definitely worth picking up at that price.

I've been to see THE WORLD'S END which was very good but essentially Shaun with robots. It was nice to see Pegg playing an arsehole/against type. 3.5/5

I watched UNHAPPY BIRTHDAY last night which was a twist on The Wicker Man but ultimately rather boring. Plus, I'm working my way through THE FALL with Gillian Anderson who was also in HANNIBAL which finished this week and was nothing short of excellent. Can't wait to own the season on BR from 2nd Sept. I've also got the following films to watch (I've got a serious backlog! ...RED (the sequel looks pretty decent); JUDAS KISS; WRONG TURN 5; JUAN OF THE DEAD; STRAW DOGS remake (still!!!)).

I'm going to see THE HEAT tonight and plan to see THE CONJURING and ONLY GOD FORGIVES before the weekend is out. Will post my thoughts when I get chance!

< Message edited by losthighway -- 2/8/2013 1:04:44 PM >


_____________________________

The secret to becoming a star is knowing how to behave like one.

(in reply to evil bill)
Post #: 15048
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 2/8/2013 4:05:43 PM   
paul.mccluskey


Posts: 5159
Joined: 15/4/2007
From: Port Glasgow, Scotland, UK
LH, did you catch the finale of The Returned? WTF?! Can't wait for the second series!

(in reply to losthighway)
Post #: 15049
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 4/8/2013 1:08:52 PM   
evil bill


Posts: 6721
Joined: 19/7/2006
From: mordor/ uk
quote:

ORIGINAL: losthighway

There are very few true psychopaths in the world as they have to meet a specific criteria. I've worked with a guy who hit 4 out of the (if I recall correctly!?) 5 points of psychopathy, plus other people diagnosed with personality disorder and trust me Elijah Wood wasn't miscast at all imho. As for the film, I've got the BR but haven't rewatched it as yet... I recall being slightly disappointed by it at the cinema but at the same time impressed by its photography and score. It's £5 on DVD at Sainsburys at the minute so definitely worth picking up at that price.

I've been to see THE WORLD'S END which was very good but essentially Shaun with robots. It was nice to see Pegg playing an arsehole/against type. 3.5/5

I watched UNHAPPY BIRTHDAY last night which was a twist on The Wicker Man but ultimately rather boring. Plus, I'm working my way through THE FALL with Gillian Anderson who was also in HANNIBAL which finished this week and was nothing short of excellent. Can't wait to own the season on BR from 2nd Sept. I've also got the following films to watch (I've got a serious backlog! ...RED (the sequel looks pretty decent); JUDAS KISS; WRONG TURN 5; JUAN OF THE DEAD; STRAW DOGS remake (still!!!)).

I'm going to see THE HEAT tonight and plan to see THE CONJURING and ONLY GOD FORGIVES before the weekend is out. Will post my thoughts when I get chance!

Elijah Wood did a fair job of the part, I did say "he makes a valiant effort to portray a man struggling with inner demons, who in the end is not just a mindless killer, but far worse a deranged psycho " my problem is that Joe Spinell in the original 1980 film nailed the part so well, I found it hard to get round the fact at no time did I feel a chill in Wood's psycho, as well made as the film is it just fell short. I maybe expected to much of it as I thought it would like THE HILLS HAVE EYES remake it would beat the original, which by the way I scored a 7/10 as well, where as Hills Have Eyes remake was an 8/10.The best Psycho film is still PSYCHO 1960 with the awesome Perkins, with Peeping Tom a very close second, and as for Maniac it  is a out and out Slasher not a look into the crazy world of psycho killers.  
HANNIBAL was awesome fully agree there with you.

_____________________________

"You listen to me now,i will find you and i will kill you!"

(in reply to losthighway)
Post #: 15050
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 5/8/2013 5:28:51 PM   
Whistler


Posts: 3124
Joined: 22/11/2006


Ed and Lorraine Warren, real life paranormal researchers, claim to have investigated over 10,000 cases in their careers, the most (in)famous being the Amityville haunting. But before that came one of their most dark, malevolent cases; the case depicted in The Conjuring. Rhode Island, 1971. When Ed and Lorraine (Wilson & Farmiga) get called to investigate strange disturbances at a farm house recently inhabited by the Perron family, they soon realize that this is no simple case of creaky floorboards – there’s something truly evil in the house. Based on a “true” story.

My already super-high expectations for The Conjuring were increased even further after the critical reception it got from its US release. There are too few genuinely scary horror films released these days - Insidious, director James Wan’s previous effort, was the last to really creep me out, and as a result he’s swiftly become my favourite contemporary horror director. Those who follow my twitter feed will know I’ve been banging on about The Conjuring for months now, about how great it looks, so it’s wonderful to report, finally, that my excitement was not misplaced.

Whether you choose to believe in the truth of this case or not makes no difference. Personally, I’m fairly open-minded about the possibility of life after death, but when it comes to demons and hell – which much of The Conjuring centres on – I’m completely out. Ironically, though, I always find demons far scarier than a serial killer, even though the latter actually has the possibility to happen. Maybe part of the reason is because I can feel safe after it’s finished with the knowledge that I'm not going to be haunted by a demon, but I have to admit, this one did plague me long into the night…

From the opening sequence of The Conjuring, where two girls recite a creepy story about their supposedly possessed doll, Annabelle (the one on all the posters and another “true” case), to Ed and Lorraine, right through to the spine-tingling climax, everything just works. It’s horror unlike most, in that it doesn’t rely solely on jump scares or seeing every single little thing. It lets your mind torture you as much as the lens. Wan is masterful at building suspense and dread, but the real genius comes with his payoffs. Where most horror films would end the long, silent trek through the house with a big jump, or show us the ghost at the end of the hallway, Wan might instead simply imply that there’s something or someone behind the door, where it’s particularly dark, or have a gloomy shadow creep down the stairs towards a little girl, or show us the ghoul but not necessarily make it a jump. The hide and clap sequence (that you may have seen in the trailer) is a perfectly spooky example. I can’t imagine anyone ever playing this game again. Mrs. Perron, stumbling through her new house blindfolded, playing the game with her youngest daughter (the searcher must find the hider with the help of three claps), finds herself in a bedroom when a closet clicks open behind her and a pair of hands creep out and clap in the most sinister way you would ever believe it’s possible to clap, drawing her towards them. It’s such a simple idea, but it’s completely terrifying. I could feel every single person in the audience squirming back into their chairs when those hands popped out. For me, that’s scarier than a jump because it’s lasting terror. Of course, there are plenty of jump scares dotted in there as well, as is a horror’s wont, but they don’t dictate the show.

Similar to how I felt with Insidious, The Conjuring feels like more than just a scary haunted house movie; it genuinely feels evil throughout. The constant presence in the house, the feeling that you know they’re being watched, that whatever’s lurking really means to cause harm. It barely allows you a second to catch your breath and regroup. You never feel safe, and it’s horrendously invigorating. The score, too, is fantastically chilling, using old-school horror strings and plucks that pierce right into you and riddle you with goosebumps. When that’s coupled with a creepy, evil witch lurking on top of a wardrobe, you know you’re in trouble.

Portraying a real person will always bear a certain hindrance on an actor; having to rein themselves in with particular tropes and idiosyncrasies, yet at the same time it can also be liberating; they can study the person and (hopefully) talk to them (though not, sadly, in Wilson’s case as Ed has passed away) to really embody the character with first-hand insight. Farmiga chatted at length with Lorraine (who is, by the way, a fascinating woman to listen to) to get inside her head and understand how she felt during this case, and I think it paid off massively. She’s a fantastic actress anyway, but there’s a real authenticity about this performance. The rest of the cast is equally as good – particularly the five young actresses playing the daughters. To play scared so believably impressive, but at such a young age is incredible.

The Conjuring, contrary to a few comments I’ve read, doesn’t steal scares from previous entries in the genre like The Exorcist, The Omen, The Haunting etc., it simply pays homage to them and finds its own voice. I even read a comment that said something along the lines of “seasoned horror fans will be unable to find it scary because we’ve seen all the scares before”, but that’s complete nonsense. I’m a seasoned horror fan – it scared the pants off me. If anything, I’d say it was the exact opposite; it creates new scares in a way that we’ve rarely seen, with the old-school ’70s vibe lending to the impression that it was made during the glory days of aforementioned horror classics, at a time when the fear of possession and the occult was rife.

This is a benchmark in modern horror. Stylized, atmospheric and masterfully-handled. I sincerely hope James Wan doesn’t abandon the genre completely because at the moment he seems to be one of the few people who knows how to do it properly. Heart-pumping, tense, sinister and genuinely frightening, The Conjuring is the 2013 horror film to beat. Take a bow, Mr. Wan.

(in reply to evil bill)
Post #: 15051
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 5/8/2013 5:33:30 PM   
Whistler


Posts: 3124
Joined: 22/11/2006


While moonlighting at a boxing club in Bangkok, drug-dealer Julian (Gosling) is persuaded by his mother (Scott Thomas) to hunt down and kill those responsible for murdering her son and Julian’s brother, which leads to confrontation with the brutal and ruthless Chang (Pansringarm).

What on earth to make of this film. I absolutely loved Drive, the previous Gosling/Refn team-up, so much so that it was my joint top film of 2011 (with Melancholia). That being the case, the prospect of this follow-up was tantalizing, particularly so after the mesmerizing trailer. It was probably too much to hope that it would top Drive, or even equal it, but one thing’s for certain: I did not expect what I saw.

I think it’s important to make a disconnect from Drive completely if you want to have any chance of finding the payload of this movie. Only God Forgives is much closer in tone to Valhalla Rising than anything else Refn’s done; very experimental, esoteric, subverts expectations, the story is propelled through striking visuals rather than expositionary dialogue, every scene is extremely slow-burning, the atmosphere grumbles and broods, the sudden bursts of extreme violence take you aback (although that’s just Refn to be fair). Some of it works, some of it doesn’t. Take Gosling’s character, Julian. He may not be a mute like Rising’s lead character, but he might as well be. If you thought The Driver didn’t talk much, you ain’t seen nothing yet. He barely says a word throughout this, and on those rare occasions when he does, it is literally just a few words, soft and quiet. Obviously it plays to the character, and clearly Refn enjoys using that particular type of silent, reflective lead, but I must admit that on occasion I was just pleading for him to say something, anything, instead of just stare and stare and stare… It gets quite uncomfortable, but then I’d be shocked if that’s what Refn didn’t intend.

I decided to sleep on it before I made a final verdict, because there’s something weirdly alluring about the film, something that subtly bleeds promise, or potential. Something that makes you less certain that you didn’t enjoy it. I thought that by taking a day, that something might shine through…yet I woke up feeling exactly the same. I think the overarching problem is its incoherence. It doesn’t really seem to have a purpose or direction. The plot is threadbare (it only reaches ninety minutes because of how long and draw-out the shots are) and scenes are thrown in which just don’t seem make any sense – at least not to me. Perhaps I just missed something completely. Regardless, it all just feels a bit tacked together; there’s no conventional narrative to cling to. Again, I’d be shocked if that’s not what Refn intended, but it doesn’t mean I have to like it.

On the flip side, this thing looks absolutely gorgeous. Every single shot is vibrant and fluid. The striking lighting rivals Citizen Kane, which in my mind still holds the candle in that department (pun intended). Somehow Bangkok’s seedy, urban criminal underworld looks alluring and beautiful. The cinematography alone is enough to win you over, albeit if it’s only temporarily, but regardless of your end verdict, this is the one constant that cannot be faulted.

Gosling is great, in his staring, pensive role. To be honest, he doesn’t really have all that much to do, but he does it well. He has a magnetism and real charisma on-screen, and I think he’s just getting better and better. An Oscar surely looms in the near future (although I doubt it will be for an uber-violent art house flick like this). Scott Thomas is fantastic, too, as the completely despicable mother. Her scenes with Gosling are wonderfully awkward and uncomfortable.

Yet alas, these were only dots on the wide canvas. I really wanted to love Only God Forgives, but in the end the stunning visuals weren’t enough to override the complete mind-melt that is the narrative. Refn is experimenting and knows exactly what he’s doing, but those experiments become too intrusive and end up leaving the audience in the dust. It forgets to connect on any emotional or physical level (apart from the odd “yikes!” of violence), and while I genuinely did like some of the weirdness, as a piece of cinematic drama, it stumbles and falls.

(in reply to Whistler)
Post #: 15052
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 5/8/2013 5:58:08 PM   
paul.mccluskey


Posts: 5159
Joined: 15/4/2007
From: Port Glasgow, Scotland, UK
Arrow have announced a couple of new Blu-ray releases. First up, on 14th October, is a 3-disc steelbook edition of The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2. Extras include:

- High Definition Blu-ray (1080p) presentation from a digital transfer supervised by Director of Photography Richard Kooris
- Optional English SDH subtitles for the deaf and hard of hearing
- Audio commentary with director and co-writer Tobe Hooper, moderated by David Gregory
- Audio commentary with stars Bill Moseley, Caroline Williams and special-effects legend Tom Savini, moderated by Michael Felsher
- “It Runs in the Family” – A documentary looking at the genesis, making-of and enduring appeal of Hooper’s film. With interviews including star Bill Johnson, co-writer L. M. Kit Carson, Richard Kooris, Bill Moseley, Caroline Williams, Tom Savini, Production Designer Cary White and more
- Alternate opening sequence with different musical score
- Deleted scenes
- “Still Feelin' the Buzz” - Interview with horror expert Stephen Thrower, author of Nightmare USA
- Original Trailer
- The Heisters (1964) Tobe Hooper’s early short film restored in HD from original elements [10 mins]
- Eggshells (1969) Tobe Hooper’s debut feature restored in HD from original elements [90 mins]
- Audio Commentary on Eggshells by Tobe Hooper
- In Conversation with Tobe Hooper - The legendary horror director speaks about his career from Eggshells to The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2
- Trailer Reel of all the major works by Tobe Hooper
- 100 page book - limited steelbook exclusive



Then, on 21st October, Arrow will release Brian De Palma's The Fury. Special features are:

- Brand new digital transfer of the film from the original camera negative
- Original uncompressed mono 2.0 PCM audio
- Optional English SDH subtitles for the deaf and hard of hearing
- Blood on the Lens: An interview with Cinematographer Richard H. Kline
- Spinning Tales: Fiona Lewis on starring in The Fury
- The Fury Revisited – An interview with Sam Irvin, intern on The Fury, author of the film’s shooting diary and then correspondent for Cinefantastique magazine
- Original archive interviews from the 1978 promotional tour, featuring Brian De Palma, producer Frank Yablans and stars Carrie Snodgress and Amy Irving
- “Double Negative” [20 mins] – A short film tribute to De Palma by Sam Irvin, starring William Finley
- Gallery of behind-the-scenes production images
- Reversible sleeve featuring original and newly commissioned artwork by Jay Shaw
- Booklet featuring new writing on the film by Chris Dumas, author of Un-American Psycho: Brian De Palma and the Political Invisible, as well as a re-print of a contemporary interview with De Palma, illustrated with original stills and posters, with more to be announced



Arrow are also working on Blu-ray editions of Invasion of The Bodysnatchers and Big Trouble in Little China. More news as I get it !

(in reply to Whistler)
Post #: 15053
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 5/8/2013 6:57:42 PM   
evil bill


Posts: 6721
Joined: 19/7/2006
From: mordor/ uk
quote:

ORIGINAL: Whistler




The Conjuring, contrary to a few comments I've read, doesn't steal scares from previous entries in the genre like The Exorcist, The Omen, The Haunting etc., it simply pays homage to them and finds its own voice. I even read a comment that said something along the lines of "seasoned horror fans will be unable to find it scary because we've seen all the scares before”, but that's complete nonsense. I'm a seasoned horror fan – it scared the pants off me. If anything, I'd say it was the exact opposite; it creates new scares in a way that we've rarely seen, with the old-school '70s vibe lending to the impression that it was made during the glory days of aforementioned horror classics, at a time when the fear of possession and the occult was rife.

This is a benchmark in modern horror. Stylized, atmospheric and masterfully-handled. I sincerely hope James Wan doesn't abandon the genre completely because at the moment he seems to be one of the few people who knows how to do it properly. Heart-pumping, tense, sinister and genuinely frightening, The Conjuring is the 2013 horror film to beat. Take a bow, Mr. Wan.

Great review of a film I've been looking forward too, like yourself I was well impressed with Insidious, so I really want to see this on the big screen, where for me great horror films need to be seen. In fact it's on at the local flicks, so it's crazy Tuesday tomorrow, so you guess where i'll be tomorrow night, and i'll let you know if the film delivers on the same level s it seems to have for you.
quote:


 


Gosling is great, in his staring, pensive role. To be honest, he doesn’t really have all that much to do, but he does it well. He has a magnetism and real charisma on-screen, and I think he’s just getting better and better. An Oscar surely looms in the near future (although I doubt it will be for an uber-violent art house flick like this). Scott Thomas is fantastic, too, as the completely despicable mother. Her scenes with Gosling are wonderfully awkward and uncomfortable.

Yet alas, these were only dots on the wide canvas. I really wanted to love Only God Forgives, but in the end the stunning visuals weren’t enough to override the complete mind-melt that is the narrative. Refn is experimenting and knows exactly what he’s doing, but those experiments become too intrusive and end up leaving the audience in the dust. It forgets to connect on any emotional or physical level (apart from the odd “yikes!” of violence), and while I genuinely did like some of the weirdness, as a piece of cinematic drama, it stumbles and falls.

This is on my hit list too, and might just work better for me than yourself, for as you know the Weirder the better, I love ye old mind melt, it gives it that repeated viewing bonus for me, plus this is one awesome visual director.


_____________________________

"You listen to me now,i will find you and i will kill you!"

(in reply to Whistler)
Post #: 15054
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 5/8/2013 7:48:15 PM   
evil bill


Posts: 6721
Joined: 19/7/2006
From: mordor/ uk
quote:

ORIGINAL: paul.mccluskey





Then, on 21st October, Arrow will release Brian De Palma's The Fury. Special features are:

- Brand new digital transfer of the film from the original camera negative
- Original uncompressed mono 2.0 PCM audio
- Optional English SDH subtitles for the deaf and hard of hearing
- Blood on the Lens: An interview with Cinematographer Richard H. Kline
- Spinning Tales: Fiona Lewis on starring in The Fury
- The Fury Revisited – An interview with Sam Irvin, intern on The Fury, author of the film's shooting diary and then correspondent for Cinefantastique magazine
- Original archive interviews from the 1978 promotional tour, featuring Brian De Palma, producer Frank Yablans and stars Carrie Snodgress and Amy Irving
- "Double Negative” [20 mins] – A short film tribute to De Palma by Sam Irvin, starring William Finley
- Gallery of behind-the-scenes production images
- Reversible sleeve featuring original and newly commissioned artwork by Jay Shaw
- Booklet featuring new writing on the film by Chris Dumas, author of Un-American Psycho: Brian De Palma and the Political Invisible, as well as a re-print of a contemporary interview with De Palma, illustrated with original stills and posters, with more to be announced



Arrow are also working on Blu-ray editions of Invasion of The Bodysnatchers and Big Trouble in Little China. More news as I get it !

Not a fan of Texas Chainsaw II, but will be getting THE FURY on Arrows Blu-Ray, plus great to hear Big Trouble In Little China getting a make over, but the one I would really want on the Blu-Ray Invasion Of The Body Snatchers, as long as it is the 1978 version.IE this one I have on DVD:
INVASION OF THE BODY SNATCHERS 1978

In this remake of the 1956 cult classic, terror slowly and silently strikes San Francisco as the city is mysteriously covered by alien spores that produce strangely beautiful flowers. Unbeknownst to the people,the flowers are bearers of alien pods that shoot out a spiderlike webbing that captures victims as they sleep and replicates there human form. Although they still look human,the victims are transformed into emotionless creatures by a strange race of aliens out to consume and control humanity--and only four people are left to stop them.

Donald Sutherland stars as Matthew Bennel, a Department of Health inspector whose close friend and co-worker Elizabeth Driscoll (Brooke Adams) is overwhelmed by fear and paranoia when she begins to suspect her boyfriend, Geoffrey (Art Hindle), of no longer being human. Together, with friends Jack (Jeff Goldblum) and Nancy (Veronica Cartwright),they are out to stop the bizarre alien Invasion before they fall victim to the alien pods. Leonard Nimoy co-stars as Dr. David Kibner, a guru psychiatrist who might not be whom he seems. This haunting parable of human paranoia is a creepy glimpse of a city overrun with robot like yuppies threatening to wipe out all of humankind, and in this Sutherland gives a knockout performance as the leader of the last four humans left in San Francisco in this terrific blend of B-movie science fiction and modern terror
.
In my book the original 1956 film is one of best thrillers of it's time, and a very hard movie to top, and as most know I'm not a great fan of remakes of classic horror and Sci/Fi films, but this version by Philip Kaufman is much better than one would expect. In fact it is scarier, more tense, darker and far more atmospheric than the original, and this is now like John Carpenters The Thing 1983, one of the best remakes of all time. Director Kaufman weaves an increasingly sinister cityscape through prowling camerawork and a highly effective stereo score which chills you to the bone. I think Don Siegel's version is good because it really evokes small town life in middle America of the 1950's, and so makes the horror and suspense all the more effective for that time. Kaufman transplants the setting to San Francisco of the late 70's and thought big city location means it loses its sense of intimacy and community, it becomes a far darker movie and  has more of an alienated urban feel to it. You get more of a feeling of not belonging, and the being the odd one out in a city full of strangers which adds to the chill factor, with the great use of the city streets at night adding to the sheer overpowering feeling of no hope. Even in daylight the great City looks foreboding with the excellent camera work and the great cast, and at no time is there any relief from the growing suspense, and you feel for these four friends, but feel just as helpless at the on screen terror.

Along with Cronenberg's The Fly and Carpenters The Thing  this is became one of  the most successful remake's of a 1950s classic Sci/Fi to date. What really helps this movie is without doubt the superb cast, with Donald Sutherland the real shining star of this film, he was one of the 1970s most interesting and intelligent actors and this and Don't Look Now are for me two films he more than excelled in. And lovely Brooke Adams (The Dead Zone, The Unborn) is first rate as the main female lead, giving some real powerto  the emotional stress between herself and Donald rest of the supporting cast.And what a great supporting cast, led by the wonderful Jeff Goldblum, Veronica Cartwright, and of course Leonard Nimoy, in his most memorable non-Trek role. Also keep an eye out for cameos by the star and director of the original version (Kevin McCarthy and Don 'Dirty Harry' Siegel), and a very brief but eerie one by Robert Duvall! This is an awesome nail-biting superior sci-fi thriller that even make's raindrops, plants and electrical cords take on a sinister life of there own, also  there's a little something extra in virtually every frame,a superb example of how to remake a horror classic, and is one of the creepiest and most nerve-wracking thrillers of the1970s,and with a killer of an ending that will stay with you forever I Kidd you not.9/10

< Message edited by evil bill -- 5/8/2013 7:53:19 PM >


_____________________________

"You listen to me now,i will find you and i will kill you!"

(in reply to paul.mccluskey)
Post #: 15055
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 5/8/2013 9:51:11 PM   
UTB


Posts: 9872
Joined: 30/9/2005
God I love that movie (Body Snatchers). It's sublime from start to finish. Just picked up the US blu ray as it happens :)

(in reply to evil bill)
Post #: 15056
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 5/8/2013 10:54:14 PM   
Mister Coe

 

Posts: 1561
Joined: 20/10/2012
I fucking LOVE The Fury!  Almost as good as Carrie...

Consider my order placed...





_____________________________

Say what now?

(in reply to UTB)
Post #: 15057
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 6/8/2013 4:49:58 PM   
Art Decade

 

Posts: 87
Joined: 29/12/2012
Nightbreed - The Cabal Cut is being released by Scream Factory!

http://www.clivebarker.info/morenightbreed.html

(in reply to evil bill)
Post #: 15058
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 6/8/2013 8:34:13 PM   
Dr Lenera

 

Posts: 3980
Joined: 19/10/2005

quote:

ORIGINAL: Mister Coe

OK, so where to you fellow lovers of WEIRD / STRANGE movies stand on GWENDOLINE?

This was a video favourite of mine back in the 80's, mainly because Tawny Kitaen, who I had a bit of a thing for after all those Whitesnake videos, got all nudey and I was an impressionable young boy.  Don't judge me! 

Just got delivery of an uncut copy, apparently with nearly four minutes of cuts restored (was the original movie that shocking?), haven't got time to watch it tonight but will do so tomorrow... Dr L and Evil Bill (or anyone else who remembers this flick), whaddya reckon?

Here's the trailer if you need a reminder...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DaEMk3lyFdw


Now there's a movie I've never seen. After seeing that trailer I will be seeing it soon.

_____________________________

check out more of my reviews on http://horrorcultfilms.co.uk/

(in reply to Mister Coe)
Post #: 15059
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 6/8/2013 8:37:03 PM   
Dr Lenera

 

Posts: 3980
Joined: 19/10/2005

quote:

ORIGINAL: Whistler



Ed and Lorraine Warren, real life paranormal researchers, claim to have investigated over 10,000 cases in their careers, the most (in)famous being the Amityville haunting. But before that came one of their most dark, malevolent cases; the case depicted in The Conjuring. Rhode Island, 1971. When Ed and Lorraine (Wilson & Farmiga) get called to investigate strange disturbances at a farm house recently inhabited by the Perron family, they soon realize that this is no simple case of creaky floorboards – there’s something truly evil in the house. Based on a “true” story.

My already super-high expectations for The Conjuring were increased even further after the critical reception it got from its US release. There are too few genuinely scary horror films released these days - Insidious, director James Wan’s previous effort, was the last to really creep me out, and as a result he’s swiftly become my favourite contemporary horror director. Those who follow my twitter feed will know I’ve been banging on about The Conjuring for months now, about how great it looks, so it’s wonderful to report, finally, that my excitement was not misplaced.

Whether you choose to believe in the truth of this case or not makes no difference. Personally, I’m fairly open-minded about the possibility of life after death, but when it comes to demons and hell – which much of The Conjuring centres on – I’m completely out. Ironically, though, I always find demons far scarier than a serial killer, even though the latter actually has the possibility to happen. Maybe part of the reason is because I can feel safe after it’s finished with the knowledge that I'm not going to be haunted by a demon, but I have to admit, this one did plague me long into the night…

From the opening sequence of The Conjuring, where two girls recite a creepy story about their supposedly possessed doll, Annabelle (the one on all the posters and another “true” case), to Ed and Lorraine, right through to the spine-tingling climax, everything just works. It’s horror unlike most, in that it doesn’t rely solely on jump scares or seeing every single little thing. It lets your mind torture you as much as the lens. Wan is masterful at building suspense and dread, but the real genius comes with his payoffs. Where most horror films would end the long, silent trek through the house with a big jump, or show us the ghost at the end of the hallway, Wan might instead simply imply that there’s something or someone behind the door, where it’s particularly dark, or have a gloomy shadow creep down the stairs towards a little girl, or show us the ghoul but not necessarily make it a jump. The hide and clap sequence (that you may have seen in the trailer) is a perfectly spooky example. I can’t imagine anyone ever playing this game again. Mrs. Perron, stumbling through her new house blindfolded, playing the game with her youngest daughter (the searcher must find the hider with the help of three claps), finds herself in a bedroom when a closet clicks open behind her and a pair of hands creep out and clap in the most sinister way you would ever believe it’s possible to clap, drawing her towards them. It’s such a simple idea, but it’s completely terrifying. I could feel every single person in the audience squirming back into their chairs when those hands popped out. For me, that’s scarier than a jump because it’s lasting terror. Of course, there are plenty of jump scares dotted in there as well, as is a horror’s wont, but they don’t dictate the show.

Similar to how I felt with Insidious, The Conjuring feels like more than just a scary haunted house movie; it genuinely feels evil throughout. The constant presence in the house, the feeling that you know they’re being watched, that whatever’s lurking really means to cause harm. It barely allows you a second to catch your breath and regroup. You never feel safe, and it’s horrendously invigorating. The score, too, is fantastically chilling, using old-school horror strings and plucks that pierce right into you and riddle you with goosebumps. When that’s coupled with a creepy, evil witch lurking on top of a wardrobe, you know you’re in trouble.

Portraying a real person will always bear a certain hindrance on an actor; having to rein themselves in with particular tropes and idiosyncrasies, yet at the same time it can also be liberating; they can study the person and (hopefully) talk to them (though not, sadly, in Wilson’s case as Ed has passed away) to really embody the character with first-hand insight. Farmiga chatted at length with Lorraine (who is, by the way, a fascinating woman to listen to) to get inside her head and understand how she felt during this case, and I think it paid off massively. She’s a fantastic actress anyway, but there’s a real authenticity about this performance. The rest of the cast is equally as good – particularly the five young actresses playing the daughters. To play scared so believably impressive, but at such a young age is incredible.

The Conjuring, contrary to a few comments I’ve read, doesn’t steal scares from previous entries in the genre like The Exorcist, The Omen, The Haunting etc., it simply pays homage to them and finds its own voice. I even read a comment that said something along the lines of “seasoned horror fans will be unable to find it scary because we’ve seen all the scares before”, but that’s complete nonsense. I’m a seasoned horror fan – it scared the pants off me. If anything, I’d say it was the exact opposite; it creates new scares in a way that we’ve rarely seen, with the old-school ’70s vibe lending to the impression that it was made during the glory days of aforementioned horror classics, at a time when the fear of possession and the occult was rife.

This is a benchmark in modern horror. Stylized, atmospheric and masterfully-handled. I sincerely hope James Wan doesn’t abandon the genre completely because at the moment he seems to be one of the few people who knows how to do it properly. Heart-pumping, tense, sinister and genuinely frightening, The Conjuring is the 2013 horror film to beat. Take a bow, Mr. Wan.


Wow, two excellent reviews there, this and Only God Forgives. These two were reviewed by others on HCF so no reviews from me on those. But, I enjoyed The Conjuring, and found some of it bloody scary, but felt it rehashed a bit too much for my liking. It worked though. Only God Forgives I am seeing tomorrow. Can't wait!

_____________________________

check out more of my reviews on http://horrorcultfilms.co.uk/

(in reply to Whistler)
Post #: 15060
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