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RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 13/6/2013 12:27:28 AM   
Mister Coe

 

Posts: 1561
Joined: 20/10/2012
OK, let's throw another one into the mix... CAT PEOPLE, the 80's remake...

I picked up a really cheap DVD of this bonkers film in Cash Converters the other day. I think I watched it once, a couple of decades ago, not seen it since. Now in the intervening years, I've seen the original 30's film and thought it was truly a classic horror flick. Really liked it. So an 80's remake, packed with gore and nudity and a Morodor soundtrack should be a truly dreadful thing? No...

Bear in mind that this is a film that asks you to believe that there is a European race that turn into big black panthers when they have sex, unless they do it with their brother or sister. That's mental! When was the last time that a current horror film asked you to swallow a concept that bizarre?

I really enjoyed CAT PEOPLE, Kinski and Mcdowell are excellent in it and Morodors score is an 80's synth classic. I'd recommend it, what do you fellow WEIRD/STRANGE MOVIES fans think?

Note to self... I REALLY need to figure out how to include movie images onto my posts...

_____________________________

Say what now?

(in reply to Dr Lenera)
Post #: 15001
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 16/6/2013 2:35:26 PM   
paul.mccluskey


Posts: 5153
Joined: 15/4/2007
From: Port Glasgow, Scotland, UK
Watched two films this weekend that are deserving of this thread. First up is Stay, which is a supernatural thriller in the same vein as Jacob's Ladder, it's beautifully shot at times, hypnotic, and quite perplexing, yet it's held together by a rather touching and heartfelt performance from Ryan Gosling, who is ably supported by Ewan McGregor and Naomi Watts.

Let Me In was next. Not as brilliant as the Swedish version but still pretty good. There are points in which it feels too similiar to the original, it doesn't try to be its own film, but the visuals are its strongest point. It was amazing to see the words "A Hammer Films Production" appear at the start of the movie.

Anyone on here starting to watch The Returned on Channel 4? Seen the first episode last week and I'm intrigued. Looks like it's gonna be compelling viewing for the next few weeks.

(in reply to Mister Coe)
Post #: 15002
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 17/6/2013 8:01:54 PM   
evil bill


Posts: 6718
Joined: 19/7/2006
From: mordor/ uk
quote:

ORIGINAL: Mister Coe

OK, let's throw another one into the mix... CAT PEOPLE, the 80's remake...

I picked up a really cheap DVD of this bonkers film in Cash Converters the other day. I think I watched it once, a couple of decades ago, not seen it since. Now in the intervening years, I've seen the original 30's film and thought it was truly a classic horror flick. Really liked it. So an 80's remake, packed with gore and nudity and a Morodor soundtrack should be a truly dreadful thing? No...

Bear in mind that this is a film that asks you to believe that there is a European race that turn into big black panthers when they have sex, unless they do it with their brother or sister. That's mental! When was the last time that a current horror film asked you to swallow a concept that bizarre?

I really enjoyed CAT PEOPLE, Kinski and Mcdowell are excellent in it and Morodors score is an 80's synth classic. I'd recommend it, what do you fellow WEIRD/STRANGE MOVIES fans think?

Note to self... I REALLY need to figure out how to include movie images onto my posts...

An interesting remake this one, as it's more Erotic thriller/horror film,where as the 1942 original was more of a chiller, so for me this is a film that stands on it's own ground, and has a quality of sexual awakening and nudity that the original didn't have. Here's an old short review of it:
CAT PEOPLE (1982)

Irene Gallier, a beautiful young woman is on the bridge of sexuality; she discovers love for the first time only to find that the explosive experience brings with it tragic consequences. However, the tremendous passion of this girl's first romantic love is so strong, it bypasses the terror around her - including her brother's extraordinary demands - as it pushes her on to her own bizarre destiny. Desire... passion... blood, her lust transforms her into one of the Cat People.


Director Paul Schrader, in his interview on the Cat People DVD, says that he regrets that he didn't just change the name of the film to remove some of the perception that this is a remake of Jacques Tourneur's Cat People from 1942. And this is the way to watch the film, as it is so wrong to look at this as just another remake. Yes there are similarities in Irena Gallier (Nastassja Kinski), background story and what she is, she visits a zoo, she falls in love with a man with the same first name of "Oliver", and there are maybe two and a half scenes similar to Tourneur's film. Now i'm a fan of Tourneur's film, too, it was and is a classic of 40's horror film history, but you have to forget about Tourneur's film when watching this one, it has more in common with Tony Scott's The Hunger or Parkers Angel Heart than the 1942 film. It is very much a product of the art house horror of the 80's, lots of gore, nudity and superb imagery, with a music score to die for, this eerie, synthesized score by Giorgio Moroder sticks in the mind long after the film ends,and the incidental songs are just as good with David Bowie's end credit hit-single "Putting Out the Fire" and Jimmy Hughes' "Why Not Tonight?" during the cab ride to the zoo both fit the mood of the film perfectly.

This is a surreal erotic horror film, with Nastassja Kinski showing off not just a great body, but great acting ability, as she is able to give a disturbing mixture of innocence and sensuality, and though she was awesome in Polanski's, Tess, and in all honesty a far better actress in it. This film shows off her beauty to even greater effect, and the sexual power her piercing gaze and small slim body give her, along with her short dark hair, she seems physically perfect for the role of Irena.Malcolm McDowell, as Irena's brother Paul, showed that he is an actor of great skill, combining the charming with the sinister in a way very few actors of today could pull off without looking to ham. John Heard gave a pretty stolid performance as Oliver, the contrast of the safe, conventional Oliver was just perfect against the dangerous but fascinating Paul. Also worth a mention is the great supporting cast of Annette O'Toole, and particularly Ruby Dee who give excellent performances too, but it's Nastassja Kinski scene stealing performance that wins hands down, with her sexy feline innocent look that changes to predator right before your eyes, just creepy yet sexy.

There are times I feel i'm watching a Brain De Palma film, the mix of erotic with horror, and the way the flow of the film in both tracking and lighting, but then Paul Schrader did work with De Palma on a film. So it's no surprise how good the cinematography, production design, sets and overall direction is on this bizarre, surreal, beautiful and visually stunning film are, and how European it feels at times, with great use of lighting, with a rich varied palette of colours similar to and as good as Dario Argento's best. For any fan of real artistic horror of a high standard, this takes some beating, it is stunning on every level, and though it comes close to being more soft porn than erotic horror, I feel it get's it just right. The nudity apart from a scene of Annette O'Toole, swimming topless, which seemed to have no other reason to be there, than for a bit of titillation, was very artistically done, with great use of camera angles, and soft lighting. The blood and gore effects had the right amount of shock value, but never spoilt the overall eerie atmosphere that fills this film, and in the end help make it one of the great unusual horror films of the 80's, that is hard to pigeon hole with the slasher films that ruled that decade.9/10


 

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"You listen to me now,i will find you and i will kill you!"

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Post #: 15003
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 17/6/2013 8:06:45 PM   
evil bill


Posts: 6718
Joined: 19/7/2006
From: mordor/ uk
quote:

ORIGINAL: paul.mccluskey

Watched two films this weekend that are deserving of this thread. First up is Stay, which is a supernatural thriller in the same vein as Jacob's Ladder, it's beautifully shot at times, hypnotic, and quite perplexing, yet it's held together by a rather touching and heartfelt performance from Ryan Gosling, who is ably supported by Ewan McGregor and Naomi Watts.

Let Me In was next. Not as brilliant as the Swedish version but still pretty good. There are points in which it feels too similiar to the original, it doesn't try to be its own film, but the visuals are its strongest point. It was amazing to see the words "A Hammer Films Production" appear at the start of the movie.

Anyone on here starting to watch The Returned on Channel 4? Seen the first episode last week and I'm intrigued. Looks like it's gonna be compelling viewing for the next few weeks.

I bought Let Me In on Blu-ray, even though I have Let The Right One In, as it is as good as the Swedish film, and it is a Hammer Horror film production, so it was a must have.
Still to see STAY, and it sounds awesome.
Enjoying THE RETURNED on Channel4, and HANNIBAL on Sky Living HD.

_____________________________

"You listen to me now,i will find you and i will kill you!"

(in reply to paul.mccluskey)
Post #: 15004
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 17/6/2013 8:15:34 PM   
Dr Lenera

 

Posts: 3970
Joined: 19/10/2005
quote:

ORIGINAL: Mister Coe

OK, let's throw another one into the mix... CAT PEOPLE, the 80's remake...

I picked up a really cheap DVD of this bonkers film in Cash Converters the other day. I think I watched it once, a couple of decades ago, not seen it since. Now in the intervening years, I've seen the original 30's film and thought it was truly a classic horror flick. Really liked it. So an 80's remake, packed with gore and nudity and a Morodor soundtrack should be a truly dreadful thing? No...

Bear in mind that this is a film that asks you to believe that there is a European race that turn into big black panthers when they have sex, unless they do it with their brother or sister. That's mental! When was the last time that a current horror film asked you to swallow a concept that bizarre?

I really enjoyed CAT PEOPLE, Kinski and Mcdowell are excellent in it and Morodors score is an 80's synth classic. I'd recommend it, what do you fellow WEIRD/STRANGE MOVIES fans think?

Note to self... I REALLY need to figure out how to include movie images onto my posts...


Love Cat People. As Bill well said, it's a remake that is more of a 'semi-remake' because it's so different, and though I love my old black and white horror, I think this version is better. It certainly goes deeper into the premise. So atmospheric, great to look at, and daring, you almost forget how daft it all is!

< Message edited by Dr Lenera -- 17/6/2013 8:16:07 PM >


_____________________________

check out more of my reviews on http://horrorcultfilms.co.uk/

(in reply to Mister Coe)
Post #: 15005
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 20/6/2013 4:41:39 PM   
evil bill


Posts: 6718
Joined: 19/7/2006
From: mordor/ uk
quote:

ORIGINAL: Dr Lenera

quote:

ORIGINAL: Mister Coe

OK, let's throw another one into the mix... CAT PEOPLE, the 80's remake...

I picked up a really cheap DVD of this bonkers film in Cash Converters the other day. I think I watched it once, a couple of decades ago, not seen it since. Now in the intervening years, I've seen the original 30's film and thought it was truly a classic horror flick. Really liked it. So an 80's remake, packed with gore and nudity and a Morodor soundtrack should be a truly dreadful thing? No...

Bear in mind that this is a film that asks you to believe that there is a European race that turn into big black panthers when they have sex, unless they do it with their brother or sister. That's mental! When was the last time that a current horror film asked you to swallow a concept that bizarre?

I really enjoyed CAT PEOPLE, Kinski and Mcdowell are excellent in it and Morodors score is an 80's synth classic. I'd recommend it, what do you fellow WEIRD/STRANGE MOVIES fans think?

Note to self... I REALLY need to figure out how to include movie images onto my posts...


Love Cat People. As Bill well said, it's a remake that is more of a 'semi-remake' because it's so different, and though I love my old black and white horror, I think this version is better. It certainly goes deeper into the premise. So atmospheric, great to look at, and daring, you almost forget how daft it all is!

Yeah it is the better film, as it is far more chilling and deeper on so many levels, but I still have a soft spot for the original, though to be honest like the director said, it would have been better if the name was different, that way no confusion on is it a remake or a re boot.

_____________________________

"You listen to me now,i will find you and i will kill you!"

(in reply to Dr Lenera)
Post #: 15006
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 26/6/2013 2:22:15 PM   
dannyfletch


Posts: 643
Joined: 25/5/2008
From: Bromley
It's been really quiet on here lately!!! Where is everyone?

Recently been to see Man of Steel and really enjoyed it! Zack Snyder has given us quite an original reboot that is very much it's own Superman movie and gives us a visually spectacular, big, loud and action packed version in which Superman is actually portrayed properly and doesn't hold back in kicking ass! It's not gonna be to everyone's taste though and those who are expecting a slow moving origins version will be sorely disappointed.

(in reply to evil bill)
Post #: 15007
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 26/6/2013 6:35:50 PM   
paul.mccluskey


Posts: 5153
Joined: 15/4/2007
From: Port Glasgow, Scotland, UK
quote:

ORIGINAL: dannyfletch

It's been really quiet on here lately!!! Where is everyone?

Recently been to see Man of Steel and really enjoyed it! Zack Snyder has given us quite an original reboot that is very much it's own Superman movie and gives us a visually spectacular, big, loud and action packed version in which Superman is actually portrayed properly and doesn't hold back in kicking ass! It's not gonna be to everyone's taste though and those who are expecting a slow moving origins version will be sorely disappointed.

Seen it on Saturday night. Loved every minute of it, admire the fact that it was a different take on the Superman mythology. Henry Cavill is gonna be big, not once did he try to imitate Christopher Reeve. Michael Shannon was also a marvel to behold as General Zod, In general, the entire cast were great, and the score by Hans Zimmer was really impressive. Zack Snyder really is a confident filmmaker.

(in reply to dannyfletch)
Post #: 15008
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 26/6/2013 7:20:17 PM   
dannyfletch


Posts: 643
Joined: 25/5/2008
From: Bromley
Great to hear more appreciation for Man of Steel! Henry Cavil did indeed do a splendid job and gave his very own take on the character, looking and acting the part perfectly for me. Micheal Shannon is the man, he's great in whatever he does and he gives one of the best bad guy in a superhero movie performances in recent years and is less camp then the also excellent Terrance Stamp was in the classic Richard Donnor version. Russell Crowe is also worth a mention as he his superb as Jol-El. I also loved the opening scene on the planet Krypton, spectacular visuals, break neck action and Krypton itself was visualised magnificently! Can't wait for the extended Blu-Ray version!

(in reply to paul.mccluskey)
Post #: 15009
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 27/6/2013 5:59:12 PM   
Dr Lenera

 

Posts: 3970
Joined: 19/10/2005
Man Of Steel was horrid. Putrid garbage.This is what I wrote elsewhere, slightly expanded:

I hated this film. astoundingly ugly to look at. Soulless, like it was made by machines. Variable CGI that at times was truly crap [I've seen better skyscraper destruction effects in the cheapest Godzilla movie]. And that bloody shakycam....I came very close to walking out, but stayed, hoping just for a minute I might get to see some of the action properly. Most of the performances were solid, and I will say that Cavill was surprisingly good, but Adams was unusually poor, maybe she realised what she was in. Overall this film is a piece of shit. It's one of the worst films of the year so far, at the moment second behind The Host. It makes Superman 4 look like a masterpiece. The fact that it's a hit is scary for the cinema.

And of course, another bloody shit Hans Zimmer score.The score was abysmal. The usual shit Zimmer turns out these days.Did absolutely nothing for the film. Totally soul-less, generic, lacking in emotion, never once enhancing what was on screen [Excitement is building. What does Zimmer do? Fucking drums, nearly all the time]. Theme? What theme? O yes, that crappy four note pattern that probabaly took him ten minutes to make up. Almost retarded in its simplicity.
Zimmer and his clones are destroying the art of film music. Though I suppose making a full orchestra sound like a cheap keyboard is some kind of genius.

I feel sorry for today's kids. Kids in the 70's grew up with the wonderful uplift and escapism of the 1978 Superman. Today's have to put up with this bilge.
This crap is an insult to Jerry Siegel, Joe Shuster, Richard Donner, Christopher Reeve and all those who created the legend of Superman. F*** you Zach Snyder and Chris Nolan.

3/10, and one star is for some of the acting and a few of the effects


But then again World War Z is pretty poo too. Anyone else hear seen it? For me, it only felt like a proper i.e. professionally shot, film, in the final quarter, when the fucking camera decided to stay still for more than a second. Thoroughly amatuerish and eye-hurting. The direction is atrocious, but what else would you expect from the director of the worst Bond film ever. It seems that filmmakers who can shoot a coherent action scene are diminishing. The plot is a mess and you can tell where they reshot stuff; it just looks different. Anything interesting or scary has been rooted out to appeal to teenagers. It's kind of exciting at times, and the sense of scale is impressive, but overall very poor.

4/10

_____________________________

check out more of my reviews on http://horrorcultfilms.co.uk/

(in reply to dannyfletch)
Post #: 15010
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 27/6/2013 7:04:11 PM   
Dr Lenera

 

Posts: 3970
Joined: 19/10/2005

A passenger plane is destroyed in mid flight in a shower of sparks. Meanwhile, a meteor lands in the Scottish Highlands and the news is heard on the radio at the Bonnie Charlie inn which receives two new guests; Justin, who has killed his wife and escaped jail, and Ellen, a model from London fleeing from somebody. As romantic entanglements start to occur and Justin is recognised by Michael Carter, a reporter who is investigating the meteor along with Prof. Hennessey, Ellen sees a flash of light through one of the windows. Then, a spaceship flies low over the inn and lands in a nearby field, from which emerges a female figure emerge from the ship. Shooting a worker from the pub who approached her, she heads towards it…..

If you were a filmgoer during the 1950’s, especially the first half, I reckon that at times you wouldn’t be able to move for alien invaders. At the end of the 40’s, there was suddenly a huge number of UFO sightings which went on for several years, so it’s no surprise that the cinema [not to mention novels and comic books] soon took advantage of this. Amongst much rubbish, though I must admit often rubbish of a highly enjoyable nature, there came out classics like Invasion Of The Body Snatchers, The Day The Earth Stood Still, It Came From Outer Space and The Thing. Now the majority of these films emitted from the USA, and most studios and filmmakers in the UK weren’t much interested in the subject. There were a few films though. Devil Girl From Mars is part of a small group that also includes from the same decade the minor classics of The Man From Planet X, The Quatermass Experiment, and its superior sequel. And it’s quite a unique little film. With a title like Devil Girl From Mars you would expect a very silly, tacky film, and you could say that that is what you get, but it’s pretty interesting, and an interesting ‘bad’ film is often more worthwhile viewing than an uninteresting ‘good’ one.

It was actually based on a play, from which its writer James Eastwood co-wrote the screenplay, though it really doesn’t seem like he altered much, the film still seeming a bit like a stage playm, with most of it taking place in one location. Shot on a very small budget, it took three weeks to film, and shooting often went into the night. There were no retakes except in cases where the film became broken. It’s probably therefore unsurprising that the film at times feels like one of Roger Corman’s ultra-cheap early productions, and, like many of them, manages to both use the tiny budget to its advantage and sometimes transcend it. Amazingly Chani the robot [more on him later] was fully automated but kept breaking down during shooting. Meanwhile star Patricia Laffan was not allowed to eat or drink because it was so hard to get in and out of her costume. When she was ten years old, highly regarded science fiction writer Octavia E. Butler was inspired to start writing after seeing this film, convinced she could come up something better. She probably did, but Devil Girl From Mars has a charming eccentricity and odd conviction that, even if you end up laughing at much of the proceedings [something even I did a few times], is hard to shake off.

The chief inspiration for this movie seems to have been The Day The Earth Stood Still, only this time most of the action takes place in a pub, and mostly the main room. The first 15 or 20 minutes are spent introducing all our human characters, and getting them all to the same place. There’s quite an interesting set-up where Justin, who has killed his wife, turns up and is welcomed by Doris the barmaid, who loves him and has to hide his identity from the others. We never do get told all the background to this but it’s unusual for the time, especially in Britain, to have a sympathetic murderer, and a wife-murderer at that. Adrienne Corri does a really good job as Doris, but I must admit that I was more interested in seeing the gorgeous Hazel Court, star of several horror classics like The Curse Of Frankenstein and The Masque Of The Red Death, in an early role, though her character’s romantic subplot is less interesting. Even when the alien does show up for the first time, the film spends a great deal of time on the humans chatting in the pub, and you know what, I really didn’t mind. I liked these people and the dialogue, while not often actually too good, had a strange kind of sparkle to it. The film obviously didn’t have the budget to have much alien ‘stuff’, but this oddly works to its advantage some of the time.

Of course every now and again our alien shows up, and she’s pretty remarkable. Clad entirely in black, she has a leather cape and boots, plus a skullcap that seems to combine a sphinx with a helmet, looking like some truly weird dominatrix. Add to that a very highbrow accent, and you have a totally memorable villain who may not seem too alien but is certainly both scary and bizarrely appealing; you won’t be able to take your eyes off her when she’s on-screen. She’s played in a perfect manner by Patricia Laffan, who this fan of historical epics immediately recognised from Quo Vadis, where she played a character who was even more evil. In fact, there are times you are almost made to partially understand Nyah’s point of view as the humans scheme and constantly cheat her, and we are told in detail what happened to Mars and why she is on earth. I reckon feminists could have real fun with this film, some finding it very pro-female, and others seeing it as typically sexist of the times. In any case, it’s notable that the women in the film tend to be strong and the men weak, the males being pretty ineffectual even when they go into action.

Occasionally the film does go outside to a very atmospheric moor set and some action around Nyah’s spaceship, which though typically flying saucer-shaped, has some interesting detail such as its interior, which seems to play interesting tricks with perspective. There’s a scene which tries to replay the great bit in The Day The Earth Stood Still when Gort the robot first comes out of the spaceship to blast all those soldiers. Nyah says she’s going to show people real alien power, the hatch slowly opens, and through what seems like a fog steps out….a fridge with arms, legs and a police siren for a head, who then vapourises a tree, a truck and a barn. Chani is one of the silliest looking robots in cinema history, he’s just hilarious in both looks and the way he walks, like on tiptoe but with his feet on the ground. A shame, because some of the special effects in this film, considering how cheap it is, are pretty good. There’s some very good matte work with people by the spaceship, and a really strange explosion in space [yes, they were making that scientific mistake even back then] which may not look realistic but is certainly cool to look at, and I wasn’t really sure how it was done.

The story has its stupid aspects. Nyah may look great and have great power, but she’s pretty stupid. Rather than just take some men away for the females on Mars to breed with, she instead shows up and tells people she’s going to do it. And, come on, surely if she had just simply asked for volunteers in a nice way, male members of the human population would have swarmed her and she would have had to call for more ships? She wouldn’t have had to kill anybody! Sometimes the script goes overboard with bogus scientific terms, but then it also has some good concepts, often used decades later, like an organic spacecraft that can repair itself. Devil Girl From Mars also suffers from having two major scenes take place mostly off-screen [though maybe this was unavoidable]. It’s an intriguing piece though, in some ways rather strange and even ahead of its time, yet in some ways as British as you can get, even having a character say “nothing like a nice cup of tea in a crisis”. It also has a very strong score by Edwin Astley. You won’t get lots of thrills and spills if you decide to purchase Network’s fabulous looking DVD, but the film is so unusual, yet oddly compelling, that I don’t think you’ll be disappointed, and it’ll probably stick in your mind for quite a while [and not in a bad way]. Many will probably say that I have rated it too highly, but I liked it very much.

Rating: 5.5/10

_____________________________

check out more of my reviews on http://horrorcultfilms.co.uk/

(in reply to Dr Lenera)
Post #: 15011
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 27/6/2013 8:10:29 PM   
Dr Lenera

 

Posts: 3970
Joined: 19/10/2005

While driving one evening, uptight city worker Harold Pelham becomes possessed and crashes his car. On the operating table, he briefly suffers clinical death, after which there appear to be two heartbeats on the monitor. When he awakes, Pelham finds his life has been turned upside-down: in his job as a director of a marine technology company he learns that he now supports a merger that he once opposed, he is apparently having an affair, friends, colleagues and acquaintances claim to have seen him in places where he has never been, and Pelham starts being followed by a mysterious silver car. Does Pelham have a doppelgänger- or is he actually going insane?

Sorry Craig, Dalton, Brosnan and Lazenby, Roger Moore will always be my second favourite James Bond; no, he’s not as good an actor as most of those, especially Craig and Dalton, but I grew up with his [and Connery’s] 007 films and to me he epitomises the screen Bond [not, I have to add, the book Bond; Dalton and Craig are far closer]. For a while last year, it didn’t seem like you could move for seeing Moore on TV appearing on TV programmes and on stage, and I had the pleasure of seeing the great man live. He often mentioned a certain film called The Man Who Haunted Himself [in fact once he told the entire plot and I just mentally switched off for a couple of minutes] with great fondness and said the lead role was his favourite part and his best performance. Of course I wanted to see the film greatly after this.

Well I can tell you that I understand why Moore thinks of the role the way he does. It stretches him as an actor more than any part he played before or after, giving the opportunity to reveal nuances both subtle and unsubtle, and Moore responds by acting his socks off and doing the part justice. Though there is the odd little known exception like his very decent stab at Sherlock Holmes [albeit in a poor film], for the most part Moore just seems to play variants on his roles as The Saint and 007. I caught a film of his on TV a few months I’d never seen called Shout At The Devil, a rather good Africa-set adventure set during WW1, and there Moore was again doing his usual stuff, virtually playing Bond in the jungle. However, The Man Who Haunted Himself really reveals him to be a fine actor who most certainly could do different kinds of roles. I guess that he was just typecast for most of his movie career after and grew content giving audiences what they expected of him.

This film was based on a short story called The Case Of Mr Pelham which had already been made as an episode of the Alfred Hitchcock Presents TV series. There’s something very scary about the idea of someone learning that they have a double or doppelganger. When I was young and first explored the dark genius of the Edgar Allan Poe, his story William Wilson frightened the hell out of me. Similarly, there was an episode of The Hammer House Of Horror featuring a doppelganger that . is still renowned for scaring viewers senseless Surprisingly, The Man Who Haunted Himself didn’t cause much interest when it came out, having two stills from the film, one showing Harold Pelham reaching across for his seat-belt and the other showing a close-up of his hand fastening the seat-belt buckle, used a part of a road safety campaign to persuade people always to wear their seat belts. It did begin to become a cult favourite eventually though, and some of that was because of a far more morbid reason than it having Moore superbly playing a serious part. Basil Dearden, the director, not a filmmaker talked much about nowadays but with classics of British cinema like The Blue Lamp and Victim on his long list of credits, died shortly after completing filming. He died in a car crash in a place that was in the exact same location that a major character dies in the film.

The Man Who Haunted Himself could be classified as a horror film, so don’t be put off by the ‘PG’ certificate. It’s more frightening in terms of its concept than what we see occur on screen, but it does get very tense. It opens, after a very Ennio Morrione-sounding-like music theme from Michael J. Lewis, with a very quickly edited car crash which made me wonder for a few seconds if I was watching a film from now rather than 1970, than proceeds at a slower pace as Harold Pelham starts to hear that he has been places and done things that he hasn’t, and come to the conclusion that he has a physical double. He’s a rigid businessman who always drives carefully, always wears the same tie, doesn’t want to make love to his wife, and doesn’t even like to gamble! How un-Bond-like is that? He does, though, at one point say: “Espionage isn’t all James Bond and Her Majesty’s Secret Service”. Yep, this is the first time you hear Moore saying two particular words on screen. And actually, Pelham’s double, until the end seen only briefly and usually in short flashbacks, is rather like Bond in his confident, smarmy way [it reminded me of my favourite performance by him as 007, The Man With The Golden Gun]. I think I speak for many men when I say that Bond is a guy who we want to be, so it’s also interesting that Pelham’s double seems to represent the man he perhaps secretly yearns to be.

The emphasis though is on the duller Pelham as his life starts to unravel. Moore is really impressive and makes his plight very believable in a basically fantastical tale which doesn’t even bother to explain itself. Freddie Jones, with an Irish accent but looking like Dr. Strangelove, turns up for a few scenes as a psychiatrist to talk babble, but we end up none the wiser. Though it really takes its time to build up a head of steam and sometimes holds back from the more interesting possibilities of the concept, he film does become more and more gripping and climaxes in a stunningly shot car chase where Moore is bathed in lights of various colours. It’s like something out of a Mario Bava film, though I guess some modern viewers are used to lengthier, more elaborate climaxes. Then there’s a very clever ending where you really have to be watching very carefully to notice what has happened. Like much of the film, it’s quite low-key. Except for one shot where one Pelham circles round the other, a shot which doesn’t look perfect but is still very impressive and must been incredibly difficult to achieve in 1970, the minimal special effects are simple but do the job.

Hildegard Neil and Olga Georges-Picit add eye candy for the male viewer as the two women in both of the Pelham’s lives and are good in the parts too. Parts of The Man Who Haunted Himself are a little clumsy and it would really have benefitted from some more detail in places, but it is still a very worthwhile endeavour, a solid thriller with a macabre twist, which it goes without saying that it’s a film which every Moore fan should have in their collection. It also seems to be making the very brave but sensible point that in order to be a better person, you may need to have both ‘good’ and ‘bad’ sides.

7/10


_____________________________

check out more of my reviews on http://horrorcultfilms.co.uk/

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Post #: 15012
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 27/6/2013 9:07:33 PM   
dannyfletch


Posts: 643
Joined: 25/5/2008
From: Bromley
I knew you wouldn't like it but 'I LOVE IT' and so did the gf!!! I actually think that Hans Zimmer is an excellent composer and have loved everything he has collaborated on with the also excellent Chris Nolan ( possibly my favourite mainstream director!). Can't wait for more installements and am actually looking forward to World War Z now you've said that's crap too lol

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Post #: 15013
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 29/6/2013 3:10:10 PM   
losthighway


Posts: 3248
Joined: 25/1/2006
From: Manchesterford
It's been a while since my last post due to life/work/as usual!!! So i'm just going to quickly fly through what I've watched since last on here:

BYZANTIUM... Suffered from a bit of over familiarity regarding some of the scenes/dialogue from IWTV however it should still be seen by folks on this thread. It's a very good film which looks great, has a couple of decent central performances and will be joining my collection when it hits BR in September. 4/5

MAN OF STEEL... (Ending Spoiler) First of all may I just comment on how seriously fit Henry is (I mean just check out that body/butt/frown!). This is a good film with a serious vibe of misery across it but its major issue is it throws you in the deep end action-wise from the word go and never really lets up so it just feels like a parade of action set pieces strung together with flashbacks. The ending also feel a little flat for me as a) it felt a bit too close to Star Trek 2 which i'd seen only the week before and b) after throwing each other around the city destroying it, all it took to kill Zod was a quick snap to the neck!! 4/5

THE STONE ROSES: MADE OF STONE... Even if you're not a fan of the group, Meadows film is definitely worth checking out at the cinema. It's one of the best music docs i've ever seen. Go! 4/5

GRAVE ENCOUNTERS 1 & 2 (DVD)... The original is incredibly derivative but also scared the hell out of me. The sequel is too postmodern for its own good, bigger demons (literally!), gorier but nowhere near as scary/tense. Still worth a viewing though - i've certainly seen worse! GE: 3/5; GE2: 2.5/5

I'm still watching HANNIBAL which is pure quality. Plus, i've got the MANIAC remake on pre-order (out this Monday!). It wasn't great but I have to have it in my collection regardless! Oh and i've bought KICK ASS (Steelbook Edition) to watch before the sequel hits in August. I remember finding it somewhat dull at the cinema but figured i'd give it a second chance as I've not seen it since it was released.

< Message edited by losthighway -- 29/6/2013 3:20:14 PM >


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Post #: 15014
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 3/7/2013 10:05:50 PM   
dannyfletch


Posts: 643
Joined: 25/5/2008
From: Bromley
Nice to hear more appreciation for Man of Steel. I understand that there has been about 30 mins cut from the theatrical release so I'm hoping that the blu-ray release will have the directors cut version!
I'm really looking forward to seeing Byzantium, didn't get to see it at the cinema so am going to purchase it when it's released on DVD in September as I just know I'm gonna love it!

(in reply to losthighway)
Post #: 15015
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 4/7/2013 10:32:23 PM   
Mister Coe

 

Posts: 1561
Joined: 20/10/2012
Just watched a UK horror film called THE CHILDREN (2008, I think....)

Really liked it. To sum it up... two families get together on New Years Eve and, totally out of the blue, the kids start getting unpleasant. At first, it's just vomiting and being a bit arsey... but then it all gets nasty.

I liked this film because it addresses an issue... kids can be bloody scary! The kids they cast in this movie are excellent, they really pulled it off.

There isn't much gore in this movie, which makes the brief bloody bits all the more effective...

And I commend the makers of this film for keeping it brief... it's 81 minutes long. Too many films nowadays are dragged out towards the 2-hour mark....

Anyone else seen this? What did you think?

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Post #: 15016
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 5/7/2013 9:03:04 AM   
Platter

 

Posts: 112
Joined: 14/8/2010
FYI El Topo is on Film4 tonight at 12.25 after A Field in England.


quote:

ORIGINAL: Platter

I started watching this from midnight to get the right vibe.

El Topo (1970)

It’s a movie that’s easy to admire for its warped ideas and startling images and scenes, but I can’t say I found it to be entertaining. It was a bit of an endurance test to get to the end as it was a bit boring. There was always another weird image or funny idea to keep you going. It’s well paced with little meandering. Even with the strange non-narrative moments that could have been long self-indulgent passages of random nonsense, like the wandering desert scenes, it kept going forward with a purpose and never succumbed to bloated time wasting.

My expectations were for a particularly brutal and violent film after seeing the documentary Midnight Movies: From the Margin to the Mainstream (2005). The clips it showed made it look like a sick blood bath. I saw The Holy Mountain (1973) before this and I think it’s the more extreme movie. Nothing shocked or disturbed me in this one. Perhaps I was just prepared for the worst.

The story is episodic and doesn’t add up to much. It climaxes at just over the halfway point after he has met all four of the mythical gunfighters one by one. The second half is an almost completely unconnected story about a very peculiar town. This half went on too long and began to test my patience as it felt like a whole other movie that had been bolted onto the end of the other one. I wasn’t expecting two ‘separate’ movies.

The first half is perhaps better as it has the iconic spaghetti western imagery and blood soaked landscapes. In other words, it has more traditional action movie elements. The second half is almost the same in quality, but it doesn’t have as much forward momentum. It’s images are not as extreme or as impressive, but are more subtly disturbing with its displays of moral corruption.

Did it mean anything? Probably not. I didn’t waste any time trying to find any meaning to any of it. To me it was just a bunch of crazy images and ideas bolted onto a threadbare storyline. The pictures and individual scenes were good enough to make it work.

***SPOILER IN NEXT PARAGRAPH***
I could easily be wrong, but I think the film has a sort of time loop in it. I assume the religious person who vows to kill El Topo on completion of the tunnel is a younger El Topo himself, and that the naked kid from the start of the film is his own son conceived in the basement of the bar. I didn’t go back to the start of the movie to check, but I guess the photo of the mother that is buried in the sand will be of the short woman. The two men know who each are as they are shocked when they first see each other.

The staging of scenes was often bitty with choppy editing. Basically the film is full of bad continuity and jump cuts. This was probably half by design (to disorientate and feel odd?) and half by incompetence.

The sound effects are sort of famous if you know about the making of The Exorcist (1973). I’m surprised the director of The Exorcist even noticed the sound effects in El Topo as they didn’t jump out the soundtrack and impress. The only time I even noticed the sounds was on the hanging men sequence at the start. I only noticed it because I thought the sound of them swinging was badly over the top.

I can’t say I liked the film. I also can’t say I disliked it either. Easy to admire. Hard to love. It’s too weird and interesting to be forgotten. It was definitely well worth watching. I recommend it, but don’t expect a masterpiece. His follow-up movie The Holy Mountain is much better and grander.

5 out of 10


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Post #: 15017
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 5/7/2013 10:20:06 AM   
Discodez

 

Posts: 798
Joined: 2/9/2010
I've seen the Children, I liked it too, very effective little chiller with some very good performances from the kids like you say. I guess it was very much inspired by "who can kill a child" but that's a film I haven't actually got around to seeing yet (I'm hoping for Arrow to do their thing and release a Blu-ray).

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Post #: 15018
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 6/7/2013 1:35:01 PM   
losthighway


Posts: 3248
Joined: 25/1/2006
From: Manchesterford
THE CHILDREN is an excellent film. I saw it at the cinema. It was one of those films that got a 15 at the cinema and an 18 on DVD (I forget why!).

Anyone else watch A FIELD IN ENGLAND last night? One of the worst films I've seen this year. I really do not understand all the hype Wheatley receives, his films (apart from Sightseers) have been dire and this didn't buck the trend. Overall: 1.5/5

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Post #: 15019
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 6/7/2013 4:07:25 PM   
paul.mccluskey


Posts: 5153
Joined: 15/4/2007
From: Port Glasgow, Scotland, UK
quote:

ORIGINAL: losthighway

Anyone else watch A FIELD IN ENGLAND last night? One of the worst films I've seen this year. I really do not understand all the hype Wheatley receives, his films (apart from Sightseers) have been dire and this didn't buck the trend. Overall: 1.5/5

I have to disagree, I thought it was wonderful, brilliantly imaginative and beautifully shot, Reece Sheersmith was superb, as was Michael Smiley. Wheatley is one to watch as a filmmaer, he has so much talent.

Got Maniac to watch tonight so I'll let you know what I think .

(in reply to losthighway)
Post #: 15020
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 6/7/2013 9:25:56 PM   
Mister Coe

 

Posts: 1561
Joined: 20/10/2012
Another disagreement here, Down Terrace and Kill List were excellent, IMO. Haven't seen Sightseers yet, but A Field In England was pretty damn decent, proof that you can make a really good movie on a microscopic budget.

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Post #: 15021
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 7/7/2013 12:08:19 PM   
Platter

 

Posts: 112
Joined: 14/8/2010
A Field in England (2013)

After I got past the ropey and unappealing first ten minutes it becomes okay. I eventually bought into it and the plot was developing at a decent pace. When they start digging the plot grinds to a halt as they run out of story. So they resort to a lot of time wasting meandering. Then the climax is just a lot of weird, psychedelic, quickly edited abstract nonsense in the place of much actual content. I imagine the script could have simply read, 'Ten minutes of random, weirdly edited images that don't mean much.' The ending is not outright bad as it's watchable and not tiresome, but it's still not much of a climax to reduce everything to someone farting around in the editing room with experimental cutting. What is here is quite good, and there are a few flashes of wit and insight in some of the dialogue, but they gave up on telling a coherent story all the way up to the last third. It's not a great film but I think it will be as well remembered, and perhaps even as critically admired, as The Witchfinder General and The Wicker Man in the years to come - if for no other reason than there isn't a lot of other movies like these. The black and white cinematography was annoying as the blacks were so deep that they sucked up all visual information and became black holes without any detail.

5 out of 10

--------------------------------------------------

Sound of My Voice (2012)

Very interesting little independent film about documentary makers infiltrating a cult lead by a woman who claims to be from the future. It has a low level background sinister hum to it. What is there is pretty good, it's just the isn't much of it. It's only a few sequences long and it climaxes at the end of the second act. The ending is very abrupt. The ending does work and leaves questions behind, but the deliberate holes are so artlessly gaping that any wild speculation will fit. It's not so much intriguing as annoying. Despite its flaws it was very interesting.

6 out of 10

--------------------------------------------------

Mr Brooks (2007)

A very competent sort of straight to rental style serial killer thriller with some interesting ideas and variations on the usual. It's very effective and well made. I like it a lot. I find it to be very good. The scene when Demi Moore finds the chiropractor hanging from the ceiling is from a different, much more trashier movie than everything else in the film.

8 out of 10

--------------------------------------------------

The Unbelievable Truth (1989)

It has a very funny and witty script about unusual themes and subject matter. Lots of fascinating quirky ideas and touches. It's a remarkable unique screenplay. Visually it's fine if lacking much sparkle, but then I read that it only cost $75,000 to make. It looks a lot more expensive than that with many locations and a decent sized cast - sex, lies and videotape cost a lot more to make and it looks like cramped claustrophobic cheap crap. There is no hint that the limited budget had a big compromising effect on the what they made. The acting is competent to good with likable actors playing highly likeable characters. It's surprising that the excellent and memorable lead actress didn't go on to do significant work later on. A very strong movie and quite unique.

8 out of 10

--------------------------------------------------

Santa Sangre [Holy Blood] (1989)

There are many interesting images and ideas but it doesn't feel very convincing as a proper story. The scenes don't have much connection to each other and the whole thing seems a little random. It was quite hard going and rather boring with a depressing atmosphere. Also it wasn't made with any great technique. Ultimately it wasn't any fun and was overlong and unsatisfying. Not a movie I would want to re-watch too often. Certainly not without merit, but the negatives outweigh the positives. It's a work of intellect with no real characters or conventional story to hook your attention onto.

4 out of 10

--------------------------------------------------

The Room (2003)

It has a legitimate claim to be the worst film ever made. The acting is very bad, the direction stilted and the script simply atrocious. The plot is beyond banal and uninteresting but the dialogue is even worse. It's pure tin and filled with weird repetitions, unneeded additions (the flower shop scene has lots of redundant talking), too much puffing up (the lead character is forever being talked about as a great guy) and bizarre under-reactions (the mother says she has cancer - the person she is talking to ignores that part and continues talking about something else). There are a few completely redundant scenes that add nothing (the drug dealer fight on the roof, the football game in the tuxedos). Also it's filled with lots of overlong, deeply unsexy, unerotic sex scenes. The story is poorly paced and leads nowhere. The script is a real turd, made worse by poor acting (the director in the lead role was the worst with his constant little laughs). The loudly mixed music, both incidental and specially recorded songs, sounded very fake and synthetic with dated 80s style production. Every sex scene had its own song which might be why those bits went on so long. It was laugh out loud funny in many places. Visually it's very bland with zero flair or creativity. There weren't many camera angles so lots of boring shots play for a long time. The constant cutting to random establishing shots of San Francisco to break up the scenes was very awkward. As a home made movie by amateurs it's not so bad, but as something that was made with a crew on sound stages and for proper money it's terrible. Was it fun to watch? Not really as it was boring, but there was enough bad stuff to keep me engaged with it.

2 out of 10

--------------------------------------------------

Zero Effect (1998)

Very well done defective detective story with a weird and twisty mystery and an interesting lead character. Highly enjoyable. The ending has an emotional punch to it that is surprising. It's a minor classic in my opinion.

10 out of 10

< Message edited by Platter -- 7/7/2013 12:15:25 PM >


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Post #: 15022
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 7/7/2013 12:22:16 PM   
paul.mccluskey


Posts: 5153
Joined: 15/4/2007
From: Port Glasgow, Scotland, UK
Watched Maniac last night. I've not seen the original, but I thought this was fearless filmmaking, even though at times I felt uncomfortable due to the rather disturbing violence on show. Elijah Wood delivered a truly daring, complex and believable performance, you'd never expect him to do a film like this. On a technical level, it works so well as it's shot from the killer's POV, and the score is reminiscent of Drive, very synth-led, it's excellent.

Also watched Paranormal Activity 4 last night. A few good scares, but I fear this franchise is running out of steam and fast. The ongoing plot needs to be resolved as quickly as possible or it's gonna fall into self-parody.

< Message edited by paul.mccluskey -- 8/7/2013 7:19:13 PM >

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Post #: 15023
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 7/7/2013 10:53:12 PM   
UTB


Posts: 9833
Joined: 30/9/2005

quote:

ORIGINAL: paul.mccluskey

Watched Maniac last night. I've not seen the original, but i though this was fearless filmmaking, even though at times I felt uncomfortable due to the rather disturbing violence on show. Elijah Wood delivered a truly daring, complex and believable performance, you'd never expect him to do a film like this. On a technical level, it works so well as it's shot from the killer's POV, and the score is reminiscent of Drive, very synth-led, it's excellent.

Also watched Paranormal Activity 4 last night. A few good scares, but I fear this franchise is running out of steam and fast. The ongoing plot needs to be resolved as quickly as possible or it's gonna fall into self-parody.


I saw Maniac last night too. Thought it was pretty good, technically excellent as you say, great soundtrack. Very creepy and Frank was very well 'fleshed out' unlike the usual slashers. I just can't help feel that Elijah Wood is a bit too, well, nonthreatening.

Also saw Stoker last night too. I've seen a few reviews in the official thread that either think it brilliant or "literally the worst film ever", luckily I'm in the former camp. Brilliant stuff, glad to see Park hasn't been watered down for Hollywood.


Today's been a good day for movies, too.. I did a Tabu double (first F.W. Murnau's, then Miguel Gomes', made a nice double bill), then the Criterion Blu Ray of Medium Cool and last but not least Abel Ferrara's Bad Lieutenant which looks pretty good on Blu Ray. Not that there's any need to see Harvey Keitel's cock in HD.

Spose I should have been out in the sun or watching tennis. Pah.

(in reply to paul.mccluskey)
Post #: 15024
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 11/7/2013 7:33:37 PM   
evil bill


Posts: 6718
Joined: 19/7/2006
From: mordor/ uk
quote:

ORIGINAL: UTB


quote:

ORIGINAL: paul.mccluskey

Watched Maniac last night. I've not seen the original, but i though this was fearless filmmaking, even though at times I felt uncomfortable due to the rather disturbing violence on show. Elijah Wood delivered a truly daring, complex and believable performance, you'd never expect him to do a film like this. On a technical level, it works so well as it's shot from the killer's POV, and the score is reminiscent of Drive, very synth-led, it's excellent.

Also watched Paranormal Activity 4 last night. A few good scares, but I fear this franchise is running out of steam and fast. The ongoing plot needs to be resolved as quickly as possible or it's gonna fall into self-parody.


I saw Maniac last night too. Thought it was pretty good, technically excellent as you say, great soundtrack. Very creepy and Frank was very well 'fleshed out' unlike the usual slashers. I just can't help feel that Elijah Wood is a bit too, well, nonthreatening.

Also saw Stoker last night too. I've seen a few reviews in the official thread that either think it brilliant or "literally the worst film ever", luckily I'm in the former camp. Brilliant stuff, glad to see Park hasn't been watered down for Hollywood.


Today's been a good day for movies, too.. I did a Tabu double (first F.W. Murnau's, then Miguel Gomes', made a nice double bill), then the Criterion Blu Ray of Medium Cool and last but not least Abel Ferrara's Bad Lieutenant which looks pretty good on Blu Ray. Not that there's any need to see Harvey Keitel's cock in HD.

Spose I should have been out in the sun or watching tennis. Pah.

Harvey Keitel's meat and two veg, in HD maybe even more shocking than ye old uncut VHS of Bad Lieutenant.
Still to see Stoker and Manic 2013.

_____________________________

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Post #: 15025
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 11/7/2013 7:42:53 PM   
evil bill


Posts: 6718
Joined: 19/7/2006
From: mordor/ uk
quote:

ORIGINAL: Dr Lenera


A passenger plane is destroyed in mid flight in a shower of sparks. Meanwhile, a meteor lands in the Scottish Highlands and the news is heard on the radio at the Bonnie Charlie inn which receives two new guests; Justin, who has killed his wife and escaped jail, and Ellen, a model from London fleeing from somebody. As romantic entanglements start to occur and Justin is recognised by Michael Carter, a reporter who is investigating the meteor along with Prof. Hennessey, Ellen sees a flash of light through one of the windows. Then, a spaceship flies low over the inn and lands in a nearby field, from which emerges a female figure emerge from the ship. Shooting a worker from the pub who approached her, she heads towards it…..


The story has its stupid aspects. Nyah may look great and have great power, but she's pretty stupid. Rather than just take some men away for the females on Mars to breed with, she instead shows up and tells people she's going to do it. And, come on, surely if she had just simply asked for volunteers in a nice way, male members of the human population would have swarmed her and she would have had to call for more ships? She wouldn't have had to kill anybody! Sometimes the script goes overboard with bogus scientific terms, but then it also has some good concepts, often used decades later, like an organic spacecraft that can repair itself. Devil Girl From Mars also suffers from having two major scenes take place mostly off-screen [though maybe this was unavoidable]. It's an intriguing piece though, in some ways rather strange and even ahead of its time, yet in some ways as British as you can get, even having a character say "nothing like a nice cup of tea in a crisis”. It also has a very strong score by Edwin Astley. You won't get lots of thrills and spills if you decide to purchase Network's fabulous looking DVD, but the film is so unusual, yet oddly compelling, that I don't think you'll be disappointed, and it'll probably stick in your mind for quite a while [and not in a bad way]. Many will probably say that I have rated it too highly, but I liked it very much.

Rating: 5.5/10

Loved films like The Earth Stood Still, Earth V Flying Saucers, even the old Flash Gordon films, but this was maybe just to stiff upper lip than fun, and did not work for me.
quote:



While driving one evening, uptight city worker Harold Pelham becomes possessed and crashes his car. On the operating table, he briefly suffers clinical death, after which there appear to be two heartbeats on the monitor. When he awakes, Pelham finds his life has been turned upside-down: in his job as a director of a marine technology company he learns that he now supports a merger that he once opposed, he is apparently having an affair, friends, colleagues and acquaintances claim to have seen him in places where he has never been, and Pelham starts being followed by a mysterious silver car. Does Pelham have a doppelgänger- or is he actually going insane?

The emphasis though is on the duller Pelham as his life starts to unravel. Moore is really impressive and makes his plight very believable in a basically fantastical tale which doesn’t even bother to explain itself. Freddie Jones, with an Irish accent but looking like Dr. Strangelove, turns up for a few scenes as a psychiatrist to talk babble, but we end up none the wiser. Though it really takes its time to build up a head of steam and sometimes holds back from the more interesting possibilities of the concept, he film does become more and more gripping and climaxes in a stunningly shot car chase where Moore is bathed in lights of various colours. It’s like something out of a Mario Bava film, though I guess some modern viewers are used to lengthier, more elaborate climaxes. Then there’s a very clever ending where you really have to be watching very carefully to notice what has happened. Like much of the film, it’s quite low-key. Except for one shot where one Pelham circles round the other, a shot which doesn’t look perfect but is still very impressive and must been incredibly difficult to achieve in 1970, the minimal special effects are simple but do the job.

Hildegard Neil and Olga Georges-Picit add eye candy for the male viewer as the two women in both of the Pelham’s lives and are good in the parts too. Parts of The Man Who Haunted Himself are a little clumsy and it would really have benefitted from some more detail in places, but it is still a very worthwhile endeavour, a solid thriller with a macabre twist, which it goes without saying that it’s a film which every Moore fan should have in their collection. It also seems to be making the very brave but sensible point that in order to be a better person, you may need to have both ‘good’ and ‘bad’ sides.

7/10


Now this for me is a gem of a British film, that works on many levels without becoming bogged down, and with a great sting in the tail. You've done a superb review mate of a forgotten cult classic, that deserves more fans, even those who feel Rodger Moore is a bit to cardboard will be surprised by this one.

_____________________________

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Post #: 15026
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 11/7/2013 8:00:22 PM   
evil bill


Posts: 6718
Joined: 19/7/2006
From: mordor/ uk
quote:

ORIGINAL: Mister Coe

Just watched a UK horror film called THE CHILDREN (2008, I think....)

Really liked it. To sum it up... two families get together on New Years Eve and, totally out of the blue, the kids start getting unpleasant. At first, it's just vomiting and being a bit arsey... but then it all gets nasty.

I liked this film because it addresses an issue... kids can be bloody scary! The kids they cast in this movie are excellent, they really pulled it off.

There isn't much gore in this movie, which makes the brief bloody bits all the more effective...

And I commend the makers of this film for keeping it brief... it's 81 minutes long. Too many films nowadays are dragged out towards the 2-hour mark....

Anyone else seen this? What did you think?

THE CHILDREN (2008)
 

Elaine and Jonah and their children come to spend New Year with her sister Chloe and husband Robbie and their young family at their isolated country home. One by one the children ,after apparently being sick, become murderous in their actions, setting out to kill the adults, who have to resort to killing the youngsters to survive. Two adult survivors manage to drive off into the snowy countryside but their ordeal is not over. 

The Children is well directed by Tom Shankland who does well in convincing us of kids terrorizing there parents.Opening the film with a perfectly paced piece of family drama and characterization, Shankland introduces us to our characters that we instinctively know at least one of is going to get whacked off. We get to like and loath these people in equal measures, and this makes his far more real, and so much more terrifying. And in turn makes the movie's rather predictable middle part a little more sustainable thanks to the domestic overtone to all the violence and horror. Some nice set pieces of murder as the parents refuse to believe there kids are now manic killers. One thing that really is quite astounding about the movie however lies in the performances, not just in the adults, but of the children themselves. Overall well directed and acted,the script is predictable but still fun, and enough gore(but not in excess) to keep us gore hounds happy, a great chiller.The Children is a good example of horror done well, but nowhere near perfect, and is a take on Village Of The Damned/The Children Of The Damned story. Overall it's good British horror done well if not perfect, and a great evenings chiller to keep you on your toes if not frighten out of your wits.7/10 

_____________________________

"You listen to me now,i will find you and i will kill you!"

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Post #: 15027
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 11/7/2013 8:05:43 PM   
evil bill


Posts: 6718
Joined: 19/7/2006
From: mordor/ uk
quote:

ORIGINAL: dannyfletch

Nice to hear more appreciation for Man of Steel. I understand that there has been about 30 mins cut from the theatrical release so I'm hoping that the blu-ray release will have the directors cut version!
I'm really looking forward to seeing Byzantium, didn't get to see it at the cinema so am going to purchase it when it's released on DVD in September as I just know I'm gonna love it!


Seen MAN OF STEEL on Tuesday after coming back from my short Holiday, and must say I was dreading it but one of my kids wanted to see it, so off we went. And surprise it is darker more intense than the Christopher Reeve version, yet the same tale, with a great score to boot, but I've never been a fan of Superman, and still not, but for a matinee outing to see a Blockbuster it was a fun filled couple of hours.


_____________________________

"You listen to me now,i will find you and i will kill you!"

(in reply to dannyfletch)
Post #: 15028
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 18/7/2013 9:15:50 AM   
Platter

 

Posts: 112
Joined: 14/8/2010
I wrote a novella. It goes by the title of Eyes Drift Back.



The blurb:
Julia hopes to have seen the last of her wealthy ex-husband after a contentious divorce.

Unfortunately his petty nature won’t allow him to leave her alone. He feels the need to make her life difficult with obtuse legal harassments. He dispatches a young trainee lawyer to go to her country home with instructions to make her sign over the house to him. The property has an ambiguous ownership history between them.

Julia, almost as bitter as her ex-husband, manages to talk the trainee lawyer into seeing things her way.

They conspire to lure her ex-husband to the house so they can get him to see the situation from a different point of view. At gunpoint if necessary.

A surreal psychological war develops and plays out around the property and its adjoining wheat field.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Eyes-Drift-Back-ebook/dp/B00CJT5BTA/ref=pd_rhf_pe_p_t_1_4NZ5

I haven’t timed the book, but it should probably take three hours to read.

I’ve published it as a download on Amazon. Unfortunately Amazon insists on a minimum price. So sadly it’s 77p to download.

Luckily I’ve set up a short term promotion on it. So it’s free to download from today until Monday the 22nd this month. You don’t need to have a Kindle as it can be read on your computer, on a mobile phone, on an iPad and probably other places as well. It is available worldwide, not just the UK.

My previous novellas Barker Woo and Music for a Parade of Whores are also free for the same length of time.


Music for a Parade of Whores




Performance artists perform a taboo challenging show for a shadowy figure known as Mr Herman.

The next day Mr Herman opens his safe to watch one of the snuff movies he has collected. He is shocked to discover that the film canisters are missing.

He assumes the performance artists stole the films. He sets his snuff makers on their trail to recover them.

Enthusiasts of surrealist films by David Lynch (Eraserhead, Blue Velvet, Twin Peaks, Wild at Heart, Lost Highway and Mulholland Drive), Luis Buñuel (The Exterminating Angel, Diary of a Chambermaid, Belle de Jour and The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie) and Alejandro Jodorowsky (El Topo, The Holy Mountain and Santa Sangre) should find a lot to enjoy in this novella.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Music-Parade-Whores-ebook/dp/B00BWFJ47M/ref=sr_1_2?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1363811234&sr=1-2


Barker Woo




A post-rock art band attracts the attention of supernatural forces.

'A pretty good read.
Downloaded and read it yesterday. Very disturbing in parts, positively peculiar in others and some very funny bits too.'
Mike_H theafterword.co.uk 20 November 2012 - 6:57pm.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B00A6OQOWS/ref=cm_cd_asin_lnk

_____________________________

My novel:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/This-Cuckoo-Island-ebook/dp/B00EIP4ZVS/ref=sr_1_4?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1377097535&sr=1-4

(in reply to evil bill)
Post #: 15029
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies? - 22/7/2013 7:42:27 PM   
evil bill


Posts: 6718
Joined: 19/7/2006
From: mordor/ uk
Well I've pre ordered the Steel Box Blu-Ray of this classic so here's ye old review as I wait for Arrow Film re master/ re print.
THE BEYOND  1981

The New Yorker Liza Merril inherits an old hotel in Louisiana, and invests her savings to reopen the place, unaware that it served as the gateway to hell more than fifty years ago. Her dream is to build a new life for herself, but this turns into a nightmare as the evil still lives and horror's straight out of H.P.Lovecraft's book of Eibon lay claim to her very soul and those around her. While repairing the building, many people die, and local Dr. John McCabe feels close to Liza and tries to help her to solve the mystery of the hotel. Meanwhile, Emily, a blind woman, advises Liza to leave the place as soon as possible. Hell's gateway is open, permitting the dead walk on Earth.

Following the successful release of City Of The Living Dead, Fulci's first in what was to be his Gate's of Hell trilogy, he decided to do a Haunted House tale instead with a Lovecraft feel. Fulci wanted to do a film that was in part inspired by and pay homage to his idol, French Surrealist playwright Antonin Artaud, who envisioned theater being less about linear plot and more about cruel/brutal imagery and symbolism that could shock its audience. So in The Beyond original story we have a woman moving into a hotel built on one of the seven gates of hell, with the dead leaving hell and entering the hotel with little outside of the ensuing carnage to link the scenes together. But the German distribution company that owned the release rights to Fulci's films at the time were not interested, they wanted more zombies, as this was big box office for little money at the time. So Lucio Fulci agreed to rewrite his film, adding zombies and completely rewriting the film's final act to include a shoot-out between the main characters and a zombie horde at a local hospital. Despite these revisions, or maybe because of them? many fans believe this to be one of Fulci's best films, in fact the best, and i for one agree.
Upon release in Europe in 1981,and because of the film's gore-filled brutal murder sequences, it's release to the UK was stopped and delayed till 1983 in the US. Which  still ended up with it being heavily censored and given a name change to Seven Doors Of Death when the film was released in the US. Also a brand new musical score was inserted into the film, and this is the version that did the rounds in the VHS rental tape 80's.And yet it still got removed from shelves during the Video Nasty debate, though to be honest it was more due to the fact a Bootleg version, that was fully uncut did the rounds,and most horror fans got there hands on this beauty.
In 1998 Grindhouse Releasing and a certain Quintin Tarantnio acquired the distribution rights to The Beyond in it's full Uncut form. They met with Fulci and later his Daughter, and completely digitally remastered and produced the DVD, and sourced  bonus materials. In order to receive a wider audience, Tarantino lent his name to the finished DVD and it was re-released through a division of Tarantino's Rolling Thunder Production Company and Miramax Films, and got great reviews at it's midnight showings across the states. Anchor Bay released 20'000 copy's of a limited edition DVD of the film in 2000,but the Grindhouse DVD did not see light of day till 2008,after a lot of pressure from Fans.Now we are soon to see a fully HD version Uncut from Arrow Films,so the legend lives on,now on Blu-Ray for all to enjoy.


This is one of the greatest Horror/Zombie movies ever made, it is full on horror movie with no let up or humour to give you release from its terrifying grip. It is without doubt Lucio Fulci's best film and an Italian horror masterpiece, an undead epic with a truly dark Gothic atmosphere. It has that feel of a bizarre H P Lovcraft story feel to it and of course the gore comes thick and fast, with over-the-top depictions of graphic violence, that fall into the splatter category with some standout set pieces. Like the opening shot of enraged locals going to the hotel years earlier, to stop the owner opening the gate's of hell, they nail him to the wall then pour acid over him. Or there's Anthony he takes a tumble from a library ladder and tarantulas crawl out for lunch, feasting on lips, nose, eyelids, tongue, yes the effects look a bit naff to those brought up on a diet of CGI popcorn gore movies. But this was before CGI and if you felt let down by that scene well the scene with a child zombie having half its head blown away will get your gorehound taste buds going again, plus there's plenty more Fulci signature gore scenes that drip and pour from hell. 

Then there's the way Fulci way of adding a very undercurrent of dread and chilling fear factor, by introducing the character of Emily (Cinzia Monreale),who's also in the opening of the film reading a Satanic book called Ebion. Later we see only her heavily cataract-ed eyes in two flash cuts through the point of view of a painter working on the hotel. Later in a truly masterful sequence full of dread where Liza (Catriona MacCall) is driving on a brightly lit road in one endless shot; suddenly we see the car zoom towards a point in the distance, and this is Emily (Cinzia Monreale), standing with her guide dog, standing on a bridge in the middle of the road, clearly otherworldly and foreboding, a detail that causes Liza's steely composure to crack. This scene works so well because it's slow, deliberate, preceding a minor scare involving a painter seeing her through a window, that  foretells so much horror to come. Plus Cinzia Monreale chilling strange performance as the blind girl with the white eyes, is not a menacing spectra but a sympathetic figure we wish to know more about. This helps pull us deeper into the trap, that this nightmare of a movie has waiting for us, later we see her attacked by her guide dog which rips open her throat, very similar to the scene in SUSPIRIA, but this is more shocking because of the build up and the actresses excellent performance.

This is one of those horror movies i can't fault, and it reminds me so much of Don't Look Now, as it's so well directed full of images that stick in your mind,and with that blunt ending which leaves you with no hope just fear. Also with a brilliant script by Dardano Sacchetti who also wrote New York Ripper and City Of The Living Dead for Fulci, and also wrote the wonderful Demons for Dario Argento. Hitchcock's once said his definition of cinema is "a succession of images," well Lucio Fulci's bold incoherence honours these great words as it is a full on sensory experience. While critics complain about dialogue and plot,(which you find in a lot of Italian Horror)Fulci does his best work in nauseous moods and textures,with his use of lighting and colour. There are many scenes that remind me of this, like a maid in the bathroom who reaches into black fluid to find a bearded ghoul in the drained bathtub, or the sterility of hospital hallways with bloody gore splattered viscera, both so different yet full of different shades of light and colour.

His vision of Hell in this movie is the most disturbing ever put to film and has no equal in any film ever past or present. A film in which no power of Good presents itself, and there seems to be no way to stop the advent of Hell once the Gate has been opened. In an intriguing, climactic image, MacColl and Warbeck sport contact lenses similar to those worn by Cinzia Monreale as the blind Emily. The apparent conclusion is that they have been struck blind; however, what is really happening? earlier, Emily had made the cryptic statement that the blind "see things more clearly.” Perhaps her pupil-less eyes do not really signify blindness; perhaps this is what happens when one's sight is blasted by a glimpse into The Beyond. The fully restored  music score by Fabio Frizzi is outstanding and also chilling, his all time best, he also had done other score's for films of Fulci, including House By The Cemetery. Which with the movie City Of The Living dead  make's up the trilogy of The Gates Of Hell, and they are also his best Gothic/shock horror movies, and i do mean SHOCK!!!This is a must see movie for any true horror fan or those who just love well made strange movies, and the version i have is the uncut 89 minutes Grindhouse DVD,so make sure you get this version, and now there's Arrow Films steel box Blu Ray coming soon .Sweet Nightmares!!! 10/10


_____________________________

"You listen to me now,i will find you and i will kill you!"

(in reply to Platter)
Post #: 15030
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