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RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 28/1/2013 7:15:58 PM   
evil bill


Posts: 6742
Joined: 19/7/2006
From: mordor/ uk
quote:

ORIGINAL: dannyfletch

Just watched an American low budget independent flick called THE DAY. Don't know if anyone on here has seen it but it's definitely worth a watch. It's not amazing and has borrowed from numerous Mad Max and Night of the Living Dead style films but it is quite a dark and violently entertaining watch. It's basically set after some sort of apocalypse which we never find out about, and follows a small band of survivors as they take refuge in an abandoned house and end up being attacked by the local cannibals.
The film has a slow start and takes a bit too long to get going. Some of the performances are a bit over dramatic and there could've been a bit more meat on the bones. That said, I didn't really have any high expectations going into it.
The Last Exorcism star Ashley Bell plays the female lead and puts in quite a convincing turn as an experienced killer with a few moves up her sleeve. She shows great promise here and will hopefully go on to make more films which will give her more opportunity to kick ass as she's infinitely more impressive and convincing than the likes of Keira Knightley.
All in all if you like your survival horror movies and are not expecting anything too spectacular than The Day happily passes the time and entertains. 6/10 would be my rating

Well I haven't seen this one, but I do know it's Canadian and the Director did the bloody shit Highlander End Game, but we all make mistakes so i'll give this a try if I can get hold of it.



_____________________________

"You listen to me now,i will find you and i will kill you!"

(in reply to dannyfletch)
Post #: 14761
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 28/1/2013 7:23:56 PM   
evil bill


Posts: 6742
Joined: 19/7/2006
From: mordor/ uk
quote:

ORIGINAL: paul.mccluskey

I've watched a few films over the last couple of days. Firstly, I checked out the notorious video nasty, Don't Go in the House. Apart from one fairly disturbing sequence, it's a standard horror flick, but it's done really well. Also seen the uncut version of Jess Franco's The Bloody Judge. A Witchfinder General imitation, however, it is a brilliant hybrid of historical fact and horror, and Christopher Lee delivers an excellent performance.

Last night's movie was Devil, produced by M. Night Shyamalan. Intriguing, tense and claustrophobic, but I guessed the twist early on. That's not to say i didn't like it, I was gripped throughout actually, it was a fascinating idea.

Finally, I'm just back from Django Unchained. Quentin Tarantino has done it again, the film is a stunning piece of work, smartly directed with an awesome soundtrack and terrific performances, particularly from Christoph Waltz, who steals the show. It's Tarantino's best film since Kill Bill, glad to see it has been nominated for a few Oscars.

Nice collection of late 70's early 80's horror films you've watched, and Don't Go In The House is one sick twisted film, which I hope was the uncut version, which I saw many moons ago.
DEVIL is a wonderful twisted tale all set in an elevator, which surprised me how good it was, a good chiller/thriller with a moral tale with a sting in the end.
I hope to see Django tomorrow all being well, and as you know I just love Tarantino films, so if it's as  good if not better than Kill Bill i'm sold.


_____________________________

"You listen to me now,i will find you and i will kill you!"

(in reply to paul.mccluskey)
Post #: 14762
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 28/1/2013 9:18:59 PM   
Dr Lenera

 

Posts: 4038
Joined: 19/10/2005

In the Pacific North Western town of Noyo, many fishermen are having their livelihood endangered due to a new salmon cannery being built. Racist Hank Slattery, who takes out his biased aggression on a local fisherman Johnny Eagle who is against the cannery, and several others, are for the cannery because it will make life more prosperous for them. Jim Hill witnesses the mysterious explosion of a ship which had caught some kind of monster in its net, then finds his wife’s dog horribly mutilated. After this begins a series of attacks by humanoid sea creatures where human males are killed but the females are raped….

Humanoids From The Deep is a straight down-the-line, unashamedly trashy monster movie that doesn’t try to be any more than it is, and I like it a lot. It’s not really an especially good film, but it succeeds it what it sets out to do, and is typical of the many films that Roger Corman either directed or produced [he’s not actually credited on this one, but he executively produced it and certainly made many of the creative decisions] in that a lot was achieved with very little. For instance, for this movie they only built three monster costumes, and only one that actually worked properly, but you wouldn’t know it due to the skilful editing. It rips off everything from The Creature From The Black Lagoon to Jaws to Alien, though to me it’s always seemed closest to a forgotten [and very hard to see] effort from 1959 called The Monster Of Piedras Blancas. In any case, it adroitly mixes monsters, gore, nudity, an ecological message and even some social commentary [a typical Corman trait in his pictures which were set in the present day] into the cinematic equivalent of junk food which probably isn’t very good for you but sure is tasty in a superficial way and goes down a treat at the right time.

I guess it was the success of the Corman-produced Piranha which led to Humanoids From The Deep being put into production, though it was initially entitled Beneath The Darkness to attract a decent cast. After completion, Corman asked director Barbara Peeters to reshoot certain scenes including two monster rape scenes which were initially only shown in shadow. She refused, so was fired and Jimmy T.Murakami shot the added footage, though rumours persist that Corman shot it himself. One of the actresses Cindy Weintraub was asked to strip for a nude scene, refused, then at the premiere was shocked to see her character, played by someone else, nude in a shower! Star Ann Turkel publically protested at the exploitative additions to the film, though interestingly some of the added footage, mostly featuring monsters attacking nude teenagers, was then deleted, perhaps because it was rather repetitive. A rare example of Corman wasting footage perhaps, but then quite a bit of footage from this movie, particularly the fairground climax, did find its way into Corman’s inferior 1996 TV remake of the same name, which toned down the nasty elements and added more humour. The 1980 Humanoids From The Deep was a hit though it caused a great deal of controversy.

The reason? The two monster rape scenes, and by extension the whole idea that these creatures want to mate with human females. It’s merely an extension of those 50’s creature features where the monster carries off the heroine but is saved from possibly a fate worse than death at the last moment. Think how obvious it is what it on the Gill Man’s mind when he watches Julie Adams swimming, follows her and mimics her movements in that great ‘underwater ballet’ scene from The Creature From The Black Lagoon. The two rape scenes in Humanoids From The Deep, though distasteful, last about five seconds each so I really don’t see what the problem was [and this is coming from someone who often finds the portrayal of rape in cinema very morally questionable]. More than that, the whole thing is just ludicrous beyond belief; it’s highly doubtful that such creatures would want to mate with humans anyway.

There is no doubt that you can tell that some of the film was reshot, because it really does look like two different films stuck together for a while, a crude and exploitative one, and a more subtle and thoughtful one which is as much about the conflicts between big business and small business [a quick look at all the Tescos popping up all over the country illustrates how timely this aspect of the story still is] and racial aggression, at it is about monsters. The film really has been trimmed to the bone, with the only half-decent attempt at characterisation being the villainous Hank, played with great relish by Vic Morrow, but then this kind of film doesn’t always need much of this kind of stuff, it just needs to keep moving, gather suspense and race to an exciting climax. The numerous point-of-view shots as monsters swim under the sea and walk past houses do increase the tension though to be honest the film isn’t especially scary despite minimising the humour which most Corman productions of the time had. The climax though, as the creatures rampage through a fairground, is really well staged and is sustained for a decent length too. It was reprised, badly, for the ending of Alligator 2: The Mutation, though of course the very final scene of Humanoids From The Deep was nicked totally from a certain recently- released sci-fi/horror hit.

There’s a juicy amount of gore in this movie with bloody rippings, slashings and an especially good decapitation, all of it good work from Rob Bottin who soon went on to do his brilliant work for The Howling and The Thing. The monsters look really good with their outsized craniums [shades of the Metaluna mutant from This Island Earth], their huge mouths and their extended forearms; a considerable amount of work went into making these creatures very different from the typical Gill-Man look and as ugly as possible, and even half-plausible as mutations half-fish and half-human. Of course the explanation for the creation of the creatures is nonsense, or is it considering what they can do with genetics and stem cells these days? Science seems to increasingly have a way of making the most outlandish premise in old science-fiction and horror movies a bit more believable. Overall the script is mostly just concerned with racing the story along at top speed but does have the odd loopy touch like a hilarious bit involving a couple about to have sex, the man being a ventriloquist with a dummy in the tent with them.

Doug McClure, as usual in his films, is a reasonable leading man but nothing more, getting the job done but not projecting much charisma. One of the stars of the movie is actually composer James Horner. Another one of the many successful folk who started their careers in Corman pictures, his eerie, often dissonant and musically quite complex scores for films like this, are to me often more interesting than his later Hollywood work. Humanoids From The Deep isn’t the most attractive film visually and really doesn’t have any artistic merit whatsoever, but it is certainly Fun with a capital F if, like me, you have a weakness for this kind of movie!

6.5/10

< Message edited by Dr Lenera -- 28/1/2013 9:27:16 PM >


_____________________________

check out more of my reviews on http://horrorcultfilms.co.uk/

(in reply to evil bill)
Post #: 14763
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 28/1/2013 9:37:59 PM   
dannyfletch


Posts: 651
Joined: 25/5/2008
From: Bromley
Lol, well it's better than that at least. Just don't expect too much and you might enjoy it for what it is.

(in reply to evil bill)
Post #: 14764
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 29/1/2013 1:26:41 PM   
DAVID GILLESPIE


Posts: 2888
Joined: 27/2/2007
From: Glasgow

John Dies at the End

Running Time: 99 mins

Certification: 15

Considering Don Coscarelli has not had a full length movie release since Bubba Ho-Tep in 2002, it is no understatement to declare that the release of his latest opus is something of an event. I can't hide my admiration for Mr Coscarelli as he brought to the big screen the most twisted, surreal, frightening and original horror film of all time in Phantasm (1979). The story focussed on a galactic overlord that visits earth to dig up our dead, shrink and reanimate their bodies and send them to other ancient dimensions to work as slaves. In his latest opus called John Dies at the End he delivers another gloriously depraved sci-fi horror with a welcome return of latex gore makeup blended in with the CGI effects. Coscarelli thrives on creating a huge premise with the flimsiest of budgets and his latest project is no exception.

Dave Wong (Chase Williamson) and his titular sidekick, John (Rob Mayas) become reluctant protectors of mankind after ingesting a mind bending and deadly drug called Soy Sauce at a rock concert. The side effects include headaches, amplified senses and the ability to see and be attacked by ghostly/ demonic apparitions while jumping back and forth through time and dimensions. Dave and John store a vast array of monster slaying tools for the many manifestations that come knocking or bursting down their door. These include a propane fuelled flamethrower, sawn off shotgun, axes and best of all, a baseball bat covered in nails with strips of the old testament stuck to it.

When Dave discovers that mankind is under threat from a 'locust-like' parasite linked to a demon called Korrok, both he, John, his one handed girlfriend, her pet dog called Molly and a celebrity 'kick-ass' psychic (Clancy Brown) join forces to destroy this evil mastermind.

Reviewing John Dies at the End after one sitting is perhaps an impossible task. There are about a dozen plots and subplots being thrown at you within the first 15 minutes. Coscarelli attempts to tie all these plot threads together as Dave uncovers his story to a local reporter called Arnie played by the wonderful, Paul Giamatti. However this only succeeds in confusing matters even further.

Newcomers Chase Williamson and Rob Mayes are likeable and funny as the two slacker heroes. Their chemistry and timing is spot on as they step up against all manner of creatures, including zombies, shape changing ghouls, ghosts, parasitic demons, topless cult members and a large door 'knob'. There are also welcome cameos from Angus Scrimm as an extremely sinister priest and Glynn Turman as a shotgun-wielding detective.

Although confusing, part of the movie's charm is that there is no attempt at pacing or logical direction. John Dies at the End is a series of hilarious ideas and violent set pieces moulded into 99 minutes that fly by. Perhaps a weaker movie than Coscarelli's previous gems, Bubba Ho-Tepp and Phantasm, John Dies at the End remains a ripping yarn with flashes of brilliance and is a dead cert for cult classic status. Don't expect an extended run when this is released in March so catch it before it disappears into another dimension.

Rating 7.5/10 Beer Movie Rating: 5/5 (Beer Movie Gold)


_____________________________

Cludge Judge * Cold Fish

(in reply to dannyfletch)
Post #: 14765
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 29/1/2013 8:12:28 PM   
losthighway


Posts: 3251
Joined: 25/1/2006
From: Manchesterford
Couple of quickies...

AMERICAN MARY... Can;t recall if i've reviewed this one or not but anyway I watched it last week. Wasn;t at all what I was expecting. It's actually grounded more in reality than I thought what with the homage to The Church of Body Modification. A lot of the gore happens off screen and it goes more for atmosphere and tone rather than out and out gore, rather like TCSM did. The film is well made and whilst having quite a mainstream feel, I've actually come to like it more and more after viewing it. It makes a very avant garde piece alongside Excision but is better than that film. Well worth a purchase tbh. Overall: 3.5/5

Finally watched V/H/S this afternoon. Total rubbish! One mildly scary story involving a woman being used as a surrogate and some nice meaty blokes getting full-on naked (on a serious note, in horror terms I actually found it quite interesting the male flesh was almost as much on display as the female which as we all know tends to a predominantly female domain in the horror genre - for titilation). Anyways, this film is definitely not worth a purchase and i'm very pleased that I cancelled my BR pre-order a week ago. Overall: 1.5/5 (extra half a star for the full frontal man candy! )

And on a slightly different note, folks should try and check out THE SESSIONS at the cinema. In short, it's excellent!

_____________________________

The secret to becoming a star is knowing how to behave like one.

(in reply to DAVID GILLESPIE)
Post #: 14766
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 29/1/2013 9:57:35 PM   
dannyfletch


Posts: 651
Joined: 25/5/2008
From: Bromley
At the weekend I finally went to see DJANGO UNCHAINED and was surprised by how good it actually is! Definitely one of the best films of the year so far and a superb Tarantino flick that ranks as one of his best. Great to see the original Django, Franco Nero in a cameo looking very good for his age. Unlike some on here who weren't too impressed with his recent Inglorious Basterds, I love that movie too and think he's on a roll here and has fully recovered from the rather pointless Death Proof. Jamie Foxx is excellent but for me it's Christoph Waltz who steals the show as bounty hunter Dr King Schultz. Samuel L Jackson turns up for the last hour of the film and gives a hilarious performance as a rather twisted house servant who's turned against his own race. Tarantino shows his love for the western genre here and instead of making what could've been a tedious film with endless nods and winks to every spaghetti western under the sun, has achieved in making a strong, violent, funny and in parts even quite moving western that stands up on its own and proves that is is a genre that is by no means dead! Can't wait to own this and watch again and again 10/10

< Message edited by dannyfletch -- 29/1/2013 10:01:47 PM >

(in reply to losthighway)
Post #: 14767
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 30/1/2013 6:19:17 PM   
evil bill


Posts: 6742
Joined: 19/7/2006
From: mordor/ uk
quote:

ORIGINAL: Dr Lenera




Doug McClure, as usual in his films, is a reasonable leading man but nothing more, getting the job done but not projecting much charisma. One of the stars of the movie is actually composer James Horner. Another one of the many successful folk who started their careers in Corman pictures, his eerie, often dissonant and musically quite complex scores for films like this, are to me often more interesting than his later Hollywood work. Humanoids From The Deep isn't the most attractive film visually and really doesn't have any artistic merit whatsoever, but it is certainly Fun with a capital F if, like me, you have a weakness for this kind of movie!

6.5/10

A so bad it's good film which reminded me of that other Doug McClure film, THE LAND THAT TIME FORGOT, which has a good story, ropey effects(though at it's time of release they where pretty good), and looks excellent in the visuals/direction department. Plus like Humanoids it was great fun, and still watchable even with some ham acting, but there's just something about these type of films I just love, maybe it's the innocence or likeable actors, I just can't put my finger on it.

_____________________________

"You listen to me now,i will find you and i will kill you!"

(in reply to Dr Lenera)
Post #: 14768
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 30/1/2013 6:23:12 PM   
evil bill


Posts: 6742
Joined: 19/7/2006
From: mordor/ uk
quote:

ORIGINAL: DAVID GILLESPIE


John Dies at the End


Although confusing, part of the movie's charm is that there is no attempt at pacing or logical direction. John Dies at the End is a series of hilarious ideas and violent set pieces moulded into 99 minutes that fly by. Perhaps a weaker movie than Coscarelli's previous gems, Bubba Ho-Tepp and Phantasm, John Dies at the End remains a ripping yarn with flashes of brilliance and is a dead cert for cult classic status. Don't expect an extended run when this is released in March so catch it before it disappears into another dimension.

Rating 7.5/10

 It's just a must see movie to me, for this is a director of the most Weird/Strange horror, Sci/Fi , roadfilms ever, and with a short running time they pack a punch.

_____________________________

"You listen to me now,i will find you and i will kill you!"

(in reply to DAVID GILLESPIE)
Post #: 14769
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 30/1/2013 9:28:14 PM   
Dr Lenera

 

Posts: 4038
Joined: 19/10/2005

quote:

ORIGINAL: evil bill

quote:

ORIGINAL: Dr Lenera




Doug McClure, as usual in his films, is a reasonable leading man but nothing more, getting the job done but not projecting much charisma. One of the stars of the movie is actually composer James Horner. Another one of the many successful folk who started their careers in Corman pictures, his eerie, often dissonant and musically quite complex scores for films like this, are to me often more interesting than his later Hollywood work. Humanoids From The Deep isn't the most attractive film visually and really doesn't have any artistic merit whatsoever, but it is certainly Fun with a capital F if, like me, you have a weakness for this kind of movie!

6.5/10

A so bad it's good film which reminded me of that other Doug McClure film, THE LAND THAT TIME FORGOT, which has a good story, ropey effects(though at it's time of release they where pretty good), and looks excellent in the visuals/direction department. Plus like Humanoids it was great fun, and still watchable even with some ham acting, but there's just something about these type of films I just love, maybe it's the innocence or likeable actors, I just can't put my finger on it.


And don't forget the other two classic so-bad,theyre-so-good McClure fantasy adventures Warlords Of Atlantis and People That Time Forgot. Plus the same lot made, without McClure, At The Earth's Core [with no less than Peter Cushing], which might be the maddest of them al.l I used to adore those films as a kid,is high time I saw them again, thanks for mentioning Bill , now I have some more films to hunt down on DVD!

_____________________________

check out more of my reviews on http://horrorcultfilms.co.uk/

(in reply to evil bill)
Post #: 14770
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 30/1/2013 9:39:54 PM   
Dr Lenera

 

Posts: 4038
Joined: 19/10/2005
Now here's a film that was made for this thread and blew me away!



A man wakes up one morning, locates and opens a secret door in his apartment. Walking through it, he wanders into a packed movie house where a young child and a giant dog wander up and down the aisles. Meanwhile Oscar travels through Paris in a white limousine driven by his friend Celine. His job involves stopping for various ‘appointments’, where he has to become an entirely different character complete with makeup, mannerisms and speech. Throughout the course of the day he becomes a beggar woman, banker, motion capture artist, assassin, disappointed father and many others…..

I really hate where I live sometimes. That short statement might seem like an odd way to open a review of a film I am going to praise considerably. The thing is, if I had lived in a major city, near a cinema which had actually shown the film, I would have got to see Holy Motors on the big screen and then included it in my top twenty films of the year article: in fact, it might have topped it. However, because both of the cinemas local to me show exactly the same movies and hardly anything subtitled or unusual, I tend to miss out on many of the most interesting and critically acclaimed movies of the year. No, the powers-that-be think that the citizens of Basingstoke wouldn’t understand Beasts Of The Southern Wild or Amour [actually on second thoughts maybe they’re right], so they want the latest blockbusters in as many screens as possible, and in both 3D and 2D. Now I’m not knocking blockbusters; I often love them and happily get caught up in the hype as much as the next person, but as someone who likes diversity in his film viewing and certainly spent some of last year bemoaning the lack of originality and mediocre quality of the cinema’s output, it’s intensely frustrating that I couldn’t really get a proper overview of the year because I had missed out on quite a deal.

As I began to watch Holy Motors, I was sure I remembered writer/director Leon Carax’s name from something many years before, and after seeing the unforgettable face of its star Denis Lavant for a few minutes, I realised it was from the 1997 film les amants des Pont Neuf, a striking melding of gritty realism and romantic fantasy which really ‘wowed’ me when it came out [and I got to see it on the big screen too]. Overall he has only made five feature films over the span of his 29-year directorial career, and maybe this is a good thing, because he really does seem to be a filmmaker with a unique vision and incredible imagination which I feel could be diluted if he started tossing off a film a year. Think of Stanley Kubrick; I’m sure one of the reasons his films were so consistently outstanding is because he gave himself space in-between each film to breath and spent a long time conceiving each one.

Holy Motors is like the bastard son of Charlie Kaufman and Alexandro Jodorowsky, with a heavy influence of David Lynch. If you like the kinds of off-the-wall films these people make, than you’ll know already that you will thoroughly enjoy Holy Motors. If you don’t, then I’m not sure that I will be able to do much to convince you to see it, but I will say that it is astoundingly original and if you were bored by the predictability and laziness of much of what came out last year, this may just be the ticket for you. This film is almost the definition of the term ‘not for all tastes’, but you can say that about virtually any movie. I know some people who don’t even like Star Wars. Watching Holy Motors, I didn’t understand all of what was going on, but I got the same thrill I get from watching any film that doesn’t feel hemmed in trying to be ‘normal’ or ‘make sense’, or tries to push the boundaries and give the grey matter a good work over. Like all the great surreal films, it’s not just a random collection of weird incidents; it’s full of clues, allusions, suggestions etc, as to what it might be all about, like a puzzle box, and you can’t wait to return time and time again to try to solve all this. Such films often bypass the normal areas of the brain and reach a part which is more open and receptive.

So what we have, reduced to its most simplistic level, is basically a tale of an actor whose job it is to play various roles, to ‘become’ other people. He travels round Paris in a white limo driven by Edith Scob, one of the stars of Eyes Without A Face, George Franju’s brilliant poetic horror masterpiece from 1960, and looking amazingly good for her age. They talk sometimes, but most of the time Oscar spends in the car is spent changing into someone else. We see in detail the various paraphernalia he has to use, from latex to blusher, and all this made me wonder if the film was, in part, about our seeming need for people [actors and actresses] to become others for our entertainment, and how odd the concept basically is. Considering Oscar’s ‘roles’ go from being a destructive tramp who seems to entertain people to a motion-capture artist, perhaps we are also being asked to think about how entertainment has progressed, or not, over the centuries. In amongst all the madness, there’s the odd comment on things like cameras getting smaller. I have a mixed attitude to this kind of thing myself. Isn’t it clever how you can now do everything on a phone? Is it actually a good thing though? Holy Motors also appears to be nothing less than about the act of seeing films, a subject that has been the basis for many great movies throughout cinema’s history.

Of course if you don’t want to think about all this kind of stuff than you don’t have to, as Oscar changes into person after person, in sequences which continually refuse to go where you think they will, but often seem to contain moments of real humanity. At one point, Oscar seems to be an old man dying, and the scene is really sad and touching, but then we have the rug pulled out from under our feet and we are left with a joke. The pace of this film is fairly leisurely; it’s not quite the sensory overload one might expect, which is why I think it is might actually be easier to assimilate than some might think, even if they’ve never even heard of The Holy Mountain or Inland Empire. There’s a bit of sexual content, most notably a motion-capture sequence that plays like a certain scene from The Lawnmower Man on drugs, and some violence in a brutal segment where Oscar becomes an assassin and has to kill…..himself [but not in the way it sounds]. Most of the film though is done with a refreshing if bonkers sense of humour, including a really odd but actually rather appropriate use of two Akira Ifikube tracks from Godzilla movies. The sight of a mad guy running around a graveyard scoffing flowers while the theme for the King Of The Monsters blares out almost brought tears of joy to this Kaiju fan’s eyes.

Apparently this sequence also refers to an earlier film by the director, but if you haven’t seen it the cineaste in you will be far more likely to pick up on the fact that, for instance, Oscar seems to live in a house that once belonged to a certain Monsieur Hulot, or that Kylie Minogue [yes, Kylie Minogue] looks and walks like Jean Seberg from a bout de soufflé. The whole history of French cinema seems to almost exist in this film, along with bits of others, and it’s all there for you to pick up if you notice, but if you don’t, it doesn’t really matter, and it never took me out of the movie, unlike for instance Quentin Tarantino’s lesser efforts, which come across of Highlights From Cool Cult Movies Which Tarantino Thinks You Should See Before You Die. I smiled at the things I picked up on and that was it. One of the things that I couldn’t stop thinking about was how brilliant Denis Lavant’s performance is. He really does become every single character. It’s a mind-boggling achievement, and the sort of performance that should win Oscars, but of course the film is too strange to even get a look in, isn’t it?

As the film goes past the half way point, we begin to be given tantalising hints about what is happening, but they remain hints. A certain sadness creeps over the film, most notably in the Minogue bit where her and Oscar meet, talk of old times, and she sings a rather sad, melancholic song. Aside from the fact that it’s shocking to hear her sing something that’s good for once [though one of her ghastly pop hits is heard earlier], the lyrics seem to be deliberately muffled so that, even if they seem to explain things regarding her and Oscar, you can only hear bits and pieces. And it soon becomes possible that the nature of Oscar’s life could actually be very sad indeed. The metaphors will be plain to see for anyone with a brain, while the film appears to end on a note which is both mad, perverse, sad, and heavily symbolic of the role of performers in cinema. Though it is followed by, and I’m not really giving much away here of this film which is full of wonderful oddness, talking automobiles. I guess in most other movies, finishing with a bit from a live-action version of Cars would seem really stupid. Not in this one.

There are portions which are a little sluggish compared with the rest of the film [though that's not automatically a bad thing], and I’m not sure if the naturalistic visual style entirely works for the material. Nonetheless, Holy Motors is a breath of fresh air, a throwback to the glory days of the 70’s where more filmmakers were willing to through caution to the winds, experiment and really go the extra mile. It’s a film that totally and utterly restores my faith in cinema, because I now know that, out there, there are still people who are willing to explore the edges of what is truly possible with the artform [and create masterpieces as they do].

Rating: 9.5/10



_____________________________

check out more of my reviews on http://horrorcultfilms.co.uk/

(in reply to evil bill)
Post #: 14771
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 1/2/2013 1:46:53 PM   
paul.mccluskey


Posts: 5182
Joined: 15/4/2007
From: Port Glasgow, Scotland, UK
Watched Paranormal Activity 3 at the beginning of the week. To be honest, it's the only horror franchise I'm enjoying at the moment, as it relies on psychological terror rather than CGI and gore effects. The plot was interesting, I like how the mythology has been set up, it doesn't feel forced. Had to turn the lights on during the last 10 minutes, the climax was beginning to really creep me out !

Also watched Jess Franco's exploitation shocker, Eugenie... the Story of Her Journey Into Perversion, on Wednesday night. Out of the Franco films I have seen, this one is his strongest, as it is directed with flair. However, I felt it was too sleazy for my liking, it lacked subtlety during the sexual moments. Still, it is a pretty solid film, and, even though he was practically deceived into making the movie, Christopher Lee delivers a commanding performance in his small appearance.

(in reply to Dr Lenera)
Post #: 14772
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 4/2/2013 6:44:51 PM   
evil bill


Posts: 6742
Joined: 19/7/2006
From: mordor/ uk
quote:

ORIGINAL: Dr Lenera


quote:

ORIGINAL: evil bill

quote:

ORIGINAL: Dr Lenera




Doug McClure, as usual in his films, is a reasonable leading man but nothing more, getting the job done but not projecting much charisma. One of the stars of the movie is actually composer James Horner. Another one of the many successful folk who started their careers in Corman pictures, his eerie, often dissonant and musically quite complex scores for films like this, are to me often more interesting than his later Hollywood work. Humanoids From The Deep isn't the most attractive film visually and really doesn't have any artistic merit whatsoever, but it is certainly Fun with a capital F if, like me, you have a weakness for this kind of movie!

6.5/10

A so bad it's good film which reminded me of that other Doug McClure film, THE LAND THAT TIME FORGOT, which has a good story, ropey effects(though at it's time of release they where pretty good), and looks excellent in the visuals/direction department. Plus like Humanoids it was great fun, and still watchable even with some ham acting, but there's just something about these type of films I just love, maybe it's the innocence or likeable actors, I just can't put my finger on it.


And don't forget the other two classic so-bad,theyre-so-good McClure fantasy adventures Warlords Of Atlantis and People That Time Forgot. Plus the same lot made, without McClure, At The Earth's Core [with no less than Peter Cushing], which might be the maddest of them al.l I used to adore those films as a kid,is high time I saw them again, thanks for mentioning Bill , now I have some more films to hunt down on DVD!

I loved At The Earths Core with the late great Peter Cushing, in fact I watched it over the Christmas Holiday on TCM,i'm hoping they show some of the other ones too.
quote:


 
As the film goes past the half way point, we begin to be given tantalising hints about what is happening, but they remain hints. A certain sadness creeps over the film, most notably in the Minogue bit where her and Oscar meet, talk of old times, and she sings a rather sad, melancholic song. Aside from the fact that it’s shocking to hear her sing something that’s good for once [though one of her ghastly pop hits is heard earlier], the lyrics seem to be deliberately muffled so that, even if they seem to explain things regarding her and Oscar, you can only hear bits and pieces. And it soon becomes possible that the nature of Oscar’s life could actually be very sad indeed. The metaphors will be plain to see for anyone with a brain, while the film appears to end on a note which is both mad, perverse, sad, and heavily symbolic of the role of performers in cinema. Though it is followed by, and I’m not really giving much away here of this film which is full of wonderful oddness, talking automobiles. I guess in most other movies, finishing with a bit from a live-action version of Cars would seem really stupid. Not in this one.

There are portions which are a little sluggish compared with the rest of the film [though that's not automatically a bad thing], and I’m not sure if the naturalistic visual style entirely works for the material. Nonetheless, Holy Motors is a breath of fresh air, a throwback to the glory days of the 70’s where more filmmakers were willing to through caution to the winds, experiment and really go the extra mile. It’s a film that totally and utterly restores my faith in cinema, because I now know that, out there, there are still people who are willing to explore the edges of what is truly possible with the artform [and create masterpieces as they do].

Rating: 9.5/10

WOW!!! high praise indeed, I will try to get my hands on this film for sure, for I too miss the fact that film makers used to just take risks, both in the style, content, visuals and sound. 

_____________________________

"You listen to me now,i will find you and i will kill you!"

(in reply to Dr Lenera)
Post #: 14773
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 4/2/2013 8:16:01 PM   
evil bill


Posts: 6742
Joined: 19/7/2006
From: mordor/ uk
quote:

ORIGINAL: paul.mccluskey

Watched Paranormal Activity 3 at the beginning of the week. To be honest, it's the only horror franchise I'm enjoying at the moment, as it relies on psychological terror rather than CGI and gore effects. The plot was interesting, I like how the mythology has been set up, it doesn't feel forced. Had to turn the lights on during the last 10 minutes, the climax was beginning to really creep me out !

Also watched Jess Franco's exploitation shocker, Eugenie... the Story of Her Journey Into Perversion, on Wednesday night. Out of the Franco films I have seen, this one is his strongest, as it is directed with flair. However, I felt it was too sleazy for my liking, it lacked subtlety during the sexual moments. Still, it is a pretty solid film, and, even though he was practically deceived into making the movie, Christopher Lee delivers a commanding performance in his small appearance.

Jes Franco knows how to shock that's for sure,and is one of those directors who is willing to just do it his way, not unlike Mr Corman in his heyday.
CORMAN/POE
The Tomb of Ligeia (Tomb of the Cat) (1964)


In 1821, when Verden Fell's(Vincent Price) wife Ligeia (Elizabeth Shepherd) dies, she is buried in a churchyard, despite the parson's objections that she can't be buried there since she isn't a Christian. Before the grave is closed, abetted by the screech of a black cat, Ligeia eyes shoot open, startling Verden, who becomes convinced that she is not dead. Months later, Lady Rowena (also played by Shepherd) is thrown from her horse and lands at the foot of Ligeia's grave. Verden tends to her and soon falls in love with her. They marry and move into Verden's gloomy Gothic abbey, where Rowena begins to have strange dreams involving Ligeia and a black cat. One night she awakens to discover a dead fox in her bed. When Ligeia's grave is exhumed, instead of Ligeia's corpse, a wax figure is discovered. Then Rowena finds, to her horror, Verden in the arms of his dead wife in a hidden room of the abbey. Having hypnotized Verden before she died, Ligeia had Verden convinced she will live forever. Verden, now possessed by the spirit of his dead wife, takes a torch to the abbey, trapping himself and Rowena in the flaming conflagration. But Christopher (John Westbrook), an admirer of Rowena, endeavours to rescue Rowena from the flames.

Once again Vincent Price stars for director Roger Corman in The Tomb of Ligeia, the last of Corman's eight Edgar Allen Poe adaptations, again it is filmed in England, and this time is shot mainly outside the confines of a studio film, with great use made of the English countryside,Stonehenge and a 900-year-old abbey. Once again the visuals are down to the wonderful moody cinematography by Nicolas Roeg, and of course Roger Corman's superb direction which is as sharp and dark as with all his Poe films, and I felt there was plenty more to come, but Roger decided this was the last. The  script by Robert Towne, is outstanding with it's play on the difference between life and death, where the boundaries which divide life from death are at best vague, where a dream ends and a nightmare begins is also vague. The script has great dialogue, but more important is it's full symbolism like the outdoor scenes are life, and the indoor ones death, plus various objects take on a sinister significance- a bunch of flowers, a dead fox and, most of all, a mysterious, malevolent black cat which may be the reincarnation of Ligeia's soul, or may be just a cat.

The acting is also excellent, especially from Elizabeth Sheppard, who adds to the sense of realism, while taking little away from the shock effect of one actress playing dual role of the, good Rowena/evil Ligeia .To be honest she steals the show for she doesn't go for your typical 'damsel in distress' performance but plays a much strong willed, not so innocent, independent, yet likable Rowena. Then a complete change of pace as creepy raven-haired Ligeia, where she manages to be genuinely evil and creepy, yet with this role she has very little screen time, but there is the bonus of the surreal dream sequence that happens somewhere in the middle of the film.Vincent Price as Fell is as you'd expect is on top form, and there is some great lines that he just delivers with such power and conviction , his dark, charismatic tones make you believe you are back in time in a very dark place. The rest of the cast do there best with the very little screen time they get,with Oliver Johnston as a servant shining in a small role, along with Frank Thornton who both need a mention, as again very little time on screen but they stood out for those few minutes.

Once again Corman doesn't fail his faithful Poe audience, as with his previous films the castle falls to a burning rubble as an internal and external struggle commences, good against evil, sanity slipping into madness and death and decay the order of the day. The castle itself is cob-webbed, foreboding, decadent, Gothic, dark and oppressive, with the use of shade light and colour once again adding to the dark heart that this film has. It is incredibly spooky, creepy and disturbing ,and holds you in it's tight fist like grip from beginning to end. You can sense what Verden is going through, his joyless discomfort in his new found love, that he is still haunted by the death of his first wife. I love the twist as to why Verden is missing at night and the reasons behind his lack of appearance once married to Rowena, it's so tragic and morbid, and as the mystery unravels, so do the lives of Verden and his wife. My own favourite part is of Verden doing battle with the black cat as the room collapses around him ,it is stunning, here we see a master crafts man at work, making full use of what sets and effects he could get a hold of .There's also a superb nightmare sequence where Rowena and Ligeia meet through the dangerous black cat, and the bell tower sequence where that cat leads Rowena to her possible doom is also a chilling shocker of a scene.The music is outstanding also and very suspenseful when it need's to, and during this scene it borders on nerve shredding, as Rowena awakens from the nightmare to find a dead fox staring at her, a hairbrush housing Ligeia's hair, and a bowl of milk she almost steps in, just a classic horror and shamefully in my book the last Corman/Poe film.9/10


_____________________________

"You listen to me now,i will find you and i will kill you!"

(in reply to paul.mccluskey)
Post #: 14774
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 4/2/2013 9:18:00 PM   
dannyfletch


Posts: 651
Joined: 25/5/2008
From: Bromley
Have ordered myself a copy of Holy Motors on blu-ray and am eagerly awaiting its arrival!
Just watched Looper and really enjoyed it. A good solid piece of sci-fi and the best thing Bruce Willis has been in for a while. If you're a fan of anything sci-fi then give it a go

(in reply to Dr Lenera)
Post #: 14775
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 5/2/2013 6:39:24 PM   
evil bill


Posts: 6742
Joined: 19/7/2006
From: mordor/ uk
quote:

ORIGINAL: dannyfletch

Have ordered myself a copy of Holy Motors on blu-ray and am eagerly awaiting its arrival!
Just watched Looper and really enjoyed it. A good solid piece of sci-fi and the best thing Bruce Willis has been in for a while. If you're a fan of anything sci-fi then give it a go

Watched LOOPER over the weekend, and it was ok but I felt i'd seen all this before, IE TIMECOP, saying that I love time travel films and as you said it's the best thing Bruce has been in lately. Though his turn in TWELVE MONKEYS was the better part and far better time travel film, which this film could have learned a few tricks from, but Looper is at heart like Timecop a Action. Sci/Fi film. Here's a couple of old reviews to see what I mean.

TIMECOP (1994)

Policeman Max Walker (Jean Claude Van Damme) is a Timecop and can travel back in time to stop Timecriminals from changing the future for there own evil ends. Back in 1994, Walker's wife Melissa (Mia Sara) is about to tell him that she is expecting their first child when they are attacked by a group of criminals. Walker is shot and beaten and lies helplessly on his lawn while he sees their home and his wife blown up by the killers. Ten years later, Walker remains an employee of the Time Enforcement Commission, a federal agency which was set up in 1994 after the U.S. government learned that time travel technology is feasible. The commission's role is to prevent time travel to protect U.S. economic interests. Walker learns that the corrupt Senator McComb (Ron Silver), who helped establish the agency, is exploiting it for personal gain, trying to establish a monopoly on time travel so that he can enrich himself in the stock market. Walker travels back in time to stop McComb from murdering his former partner. At the same time, Walker hopes to rescue his wife, and he learns that the attack on his home was ordered by McComb to stop Walker from foiling his plans.

Director Peter Hyams knows how to deliver great sci-fi Thrillers, with awesome camera work, fantastic angles, some great close up shots, plus great use of colour, and here he keeps the action and plot flowing, plus the effects for a 90's film are pretty good, also a big surprise is he gets a very good performance out of Van Damme. Who comes off as vulnerable, and even feels like real person extremely likable, and has an amazing chemistry with Mia Sara, in fact he gives his best performances ever instead of the dumb action hero he normally portrays.Mia Sara is simply amazing too and it has to be down to a well written script, as with the opening scene set in 1994 we see her demise at the hands of faceless killers in this, and poor Van Damme has to watch helplessly during this some what disturbing scene. Also the main villain Ron Silver as the evil Senator McComb is extremely menacing and at no point, do you feel anybody is hamming up what is in truth a well produced B Movie.

This is pretty violent as you'd expect from Van Damme films, with plenty of nasty gunshot wounds, a good splash of blood and some great FX in the how to kill department like the guy who gets his arm gets shattered. Some pretty graphic murders, keep us gorehounds happy, and the fast paced story gives you little time to think to hard, as there are a couple of bad edits if you watch closely enough. But  who cares this is not a serious Sci/Fi film, it's a kick ass action film, with a thrilling script, that keeps you glued while you watch the double crossing going on, and the flicking back in time to save the world from the corrupt corporate's who see the time travel as a way to enslave. There's plenty of dark humour too, with some pretty sick one liners, that even 007 might feel uncomfortable with, but here they work, as to the scenes of time travel, which remind me of The Terminator, but I think are all stolen from "Lighting" a book by Dean Koontz which most of these type of films have got there ideas from. Anyway it's no classic but it is fun, and Van Damme shows under the right director he can act, but he knows his limits as he showed in the other excellent Peter Hymans Thriller Sudden Death,so if you like me like a good action Sci/Fi just for a change give this a try.7/10
 
Twelve Monkeys (1995)
 
James Cole(Bruce Willis),is a prisoner of the state in the year 2035 who can earn parole if he agrees to travel back in time and stop a devastating plague. The virus has wiped out most of the Earth's population and the remainder live underground because the air is infected. Returning to the year 1990, six years before the start of the plague, Cole is soon imprisoned in a psychiatric facility because his warnings sound like mad ravings. There he meets a scientist named Dr. Kathryn Railly (Madeleine Stowe) and Jeffrey Goines (Brad Pitt), the mad son of an eminent virologist (Christopher Plummer). Cole is returned by the authorities to the year 2035, and finally ends up at his intended destination in 1996. He kidnaps Dr. Railly in order to enlist her help in his quest. Cole also discovers graffiti by an apparent animal rights group called the Army of the Twelve Monkeys, could they and Goine hold the key to the puzzle,of what to do?????
 
Directed by Terry Gilliam this Sci/Fi time travel film, is both intense gripping, and visual stunning, and for me is up there with his best work Brazil and Fisher King. I love the way it flicks all over the place including the 1ST World War and the fact that it is never clear whether all what you are seeing is real or not, is he from the future or insane ,is what you are seeing just visions from his own mad mind. Or does he really come from the future, where time travel is now real, was Mankind  really wiped out by a virus, released by the army of The Twelve Monkeys? Those are all questions that will leave you with a wonderful mindfuck, even after the awesome ending where it's not that clear what the fuck happened??

The cast are on full power, but performance-wise, Brad Pitt steals most of the scenes he appears in with his twist on a loony?or genus who knows more than we do. His off-the-wall performance deservedly got him an Oscar nomination, but sadly and in my view wrongly he lost. Bruce Willis gives the second best performance of his career(Pulp Fiction being his best) portraying Cole as a simple, poignant, tragic everyman, lost and alone in a world he feels has gone mad not him?. Madeline Stowe as Willis' psychologist, holds her own against these two top leads, injecting her character with both energy and strong will power as she struggles to understand why this madman seems to be telling the truth, but where he says he's from is imposable.

Overall this is a cracking action/weird/Sci/Fi drama, with superb story, that will give you plenty to think about long after it flickers out on your TV screen. I can't think of anything bad to say about this film, in fact i have no gripes ,i just love this sort of mind melt film. It's a a dark nightmarish journey, yet very rewarding if you can take the multiple twists in the plot, and with the added bonus of the bleak futuristic cinematography, we have here Gillian's third  masterpiece. It belongs beside the Sci/Fi greats of 2001 and more so Blade Runner, and for that reason i can only give it one score 10/10.

< Message edited by evil bill -- 5/2/2013 7:26:55 PM >


_____________________________

"You listen to me now,i will find you and i will kill you!"

(in reply to dannyfletch)
Post #: 14776
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 5/2/2013 7:48:29 PM   
Nexus Wookie


Posts: 2333
Joined: 24/9/2011
From: the Godcity
Superb reviews for two insanely good sci-fi/time-travelling films, evil bill!

Twelve Monkeys for me, is Gilliam's last real masterpiece and one i love coming back to from time to time (see what i did there! Sorry ), and Time Cop; Van Damme's best flick by a mile...although Kickboxer comes pretty close! . I was re-watching it the other day, and was immersed in nostaligia heaven. It came out when i was still in Secondary School and i remember me and my mates went crazy for it. I still have the comic adaption that Manga released at the time (which is pretty awesome).

Thanks for sharing evil bill!.

EDIT: talking about Twelve Monkeys just reminded me; what ever happened to Madeleine Stowe? She was one of the best actresses of the 90's abd did some memorable turns in films such as Last of the Mohicans, Unlawful Entry and of course Twelve Monkeys. Man she was great..

< Message edited by Nexus Wookie -- 5/2/2013 8:12:39 PM >


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Post #: 14777
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 5/2/2013 8:14:17 PM   
paul.mccluskey


Posts: 5182
Joined: 15/4/2007
From: Port Glasgow, Scotland, UK
Has anyone seen Insidious? One of the best horror films I have seen in a long time, I watched it on Saturday night. I didn't see it at the cinema as I dismissed it as a Poltergeist rip-off, but I gave it a chance as I'm an admirer of James Wan and Leigh Whannell's previous work. Spine-chilling from start to finish, with plenty of frightening moments. What I loved was that there is a build-up to each scare. Filmmakers these days tend to throw them in without thinking, but in this movie, everything was perfectly timed. The sequel should be interesting considering the main cast are returning. How they are gonna continue after that shocker of an ending is beyond me.

(in reply to Nexus Wookie)
Post #: 14778
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 5/2/2013 8:36:37 PM   
Nexus Wookie


Posts: 2333
Joined: 24/9/2011
From: the Godcity
I haven't watched it yet, i must rectify that soon though. I'll proabably get my missus to watch it with me; i'm such a wimp when it comes to horror films!

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Post #: 14779
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 5/2/2013 10:25:53 PM   
dannyfletch


Posts: 651
Joined: 25/5/2008
From: Bromley
Sorry but I thought Looper was miles better than Timecop!
I agree that Twelve Monkeys is indeed a very good, one of the best in fact, time travel/sci-fi movie and is the better film but I really enjoyed Looper for what it is and think that it definitely deserves the praise it has been getting. You may think that it has borrowed from various other sci-fi/ time travel movies but I think it's kind of unavoidable to make a sci-fi movie or any other movie these days without having similarities to what has been made already.

(in reply to evil bill)
Post #: 14780
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 6/2/2013 8:26:20 AM   
DAVID GILLESPIE


Posts: 2888
Joined: 27/2/2007
From: Glasgow
Yep, I would second Danny on that one, Looper was a great movie. Certainly not perfect but did try something a little different.


The Final Member (2012) - I am getting sent a copy of this documentaty as part of the Glasgow Film Festival. It is about a man who has a museum that exhibits a plethora of penises. The documentary follows his attempts to acquire a human one.
David Cameron co-stars - only joking.

< Message edited by DAVID GILLESPIE -- 6/2/2013 8:28:33 AM >


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Cludge Judge * Cold Fish

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Post #: 14781
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 6/2/2013 9:49:19 PM   
Dr Lenera

 

Posts: 4038
Joined: 19/10/2005

quote:

ORIGINAL: evil bill

quote:

ORIGINAL: paul.mccluskey

Watched Paranormal Activity 3 at the beginning of the week. To be honest, it's the only horror franchise I'm enjoying at the moment, as it relies on psychological terror rather than CGI and gore effects. The plot was interesting, I like how the mythology has been set up, it doesn't feel forced. Had to turn the lights on during the last 10 minutes, the climax was beginning to really creep me out !

Also watched Jess Franco's exploitation shocker, Eugenie... the Story of Her Journey Into Perversion, on Wednesday night. Out of the Franco films I have seen, this one is his strongest, as it is directed with flair. However, I felt it was too sleazy for my liking, it lacked subtlety during the sexual moments. Still, it is a pretty solid film, and, even though he was practically deceived into making the movie, Christopher Lee delivers a commanding performance in his small appearance.

Jes Franco knows how to shock that's for sure,and is one of those directors who is willing to just do it his way, not unlike Mr Corman in his heyday.
CORMAN/POE
The Tomb of Ligeia (Tomb of the Cat) (1964)


In 1821, when Verden Fell's(Vincent Price) wife Ligeia (Elizabeth Shepherd) dies, she is buried in a churchyard, despite the parson's objections that she can't be buried there since she isn't a Christian. Before the grave is closed, abetted by the screech of a black cat, Ligeia eyes shoot open, startling Verden, who becomes convinced that she is not dead. Months later, Lady Rowena (also played by Shepherd) is thrown from her horse and lands at the foot of Ligeia's grave. Verden tends to her and soon falls in love with her. They marry and move into Verden's gloomy Gothic abbey, where Rowena begins to have strange dreams involving Ligeia and a black cat. One night she awakens to discover a dead fox in her bed. When Ligeia's grave is exhumed, instead of Ligeia's corpse, a wax figure is discovered. Then Rowena finds, to her horror, Verden in the arms of his dead wife in a hidden room of the abbey. Having hypnotized Verden before she died, Ligeia had Verden convinced she will live forever. Verden, now possessed by the spirit of his dead wife, takes a torch to the abbey, trapping himself and Rowena in the flaming conflagration. But Christopher (John Westbrook), an admirer of Rowena, endeavours to rescue Rowena from the flames.

Once again Vincent Price stars for director Roger Corman in The Tomb of Ligeia, the last of Corman's eight Edgar Allen Poe adaptations, again it is filmed in England, and this time is shot mainly outside the confines of a studio film, with great use made of the English countryside,Stonehenge and a 900-year-old abbey. Once again the visuals are down to the wonderful moody cinematography by Nicolas Roeg, and of course Roger Corman's superb direction which is as sharp and dark as with all his Poe films, and I felt there was plenty more to come, but Roger decided this was the last. The  script by Robert Towne, is outstanding with it's play on the difference between life and death, where the boundaries which divide life from death are at best vague, where a dream ends and a nightmare begins is also vague. The script has great dialogue, but more important is it's full symbolism like the outdoor scenes are life, and the indoor ones death, plus various objects take on a sinister significance- a bunch of flowers, a dead fox and, most of all, a mysterious, malevolent black cat which may be the reincarnation of Ligeia's soul, or may be just a cat.

The acting is also excellent, especially from Elizabeth Sheppard, who adds to the sense of realism, while taking little away from the shock effect of one actress playing dual role of the, good Rowena/evil Ligeia .To be honest she steals the show for she doesn't go for your typical 'damsel in distress' performance but plays a much strong willed, not so innocent, independent, yet likable Rowena. Then a complete change of pace as creepy raven-haired Ligeia, where she manages to be genuinely evil and creepy, yet with this role she has very little screen time, but there is the bonus of the surreal dream sequence that happens somewhere in the middle of the film.Vincent Price as Fell is as you'd expect is on top form, and there is some great lines that he just delivers with such power and conviction , his dark, charismatic tones make you believe you are back in time in a very dark place. The rest of the cast do there best with the very little screen time they get,with Oliver Johnston as a servant shining in a small role, along with Frank Thornton who both need a mention, as again very little time on screen but they stood out for those few minutes.

Once again Corman doesn't fail his faithful Poe audience, as with his previous films the castle falls to a burning rubble as an internal and external struggle commences, good against evil, sanity slipping into madness and death and decay the order of the day. The castle itself is cob-webbed, foreboding, decadent, Gothic, dark and oppressive, with the use of shade light and colour once again adding to the dark heart that this film has. It is incredibly spooky, creepy and disturbing ,and holds you in it's tight fist like grip from beginning to end. You can sense what Verden is going through, his joyless discomfort in his new found love, that he is still haunted by the death of his first wife. I love the twist as to why Verden is missing at night and the reasons behind his lack of appearance once married to Rowena, it's so tragic and morbid, and as the mystery unravels, so do the lives of Verden and his wife. My own favourite part is of Verden doing battle with the black cat as the room collapses around him ,it is stunning, here we see a master crafts man at work, making full use of what sets and effects he could get a hold of .There's also a superb nightmare sequence where Rowena and Ligeia meet through the dangerous black cat, and the bell tower sequence where that cat leads Rowena to her possible doom is also a chilling shocker of a scene.The music is outstanding also and very suspenseful when it need's to, and during this scene it borders on nerve shredding, as Rowena awakens from the nightmare to find a dead fox staring at her, a hairbrush housing Ligeia's hair, and a bowl of milk she almost steps in, just a classic horror and shamefully in my book the last Corman/Poe film.9/10



Sad that this was the last indeed, though did you know that Witchfinder General was called The Conqueror Worm so people would think it was a Vincent Pride/ Poe movie.Like you I love Poe, and I actually hoped that the recent The Raven may have led to more films of his stuff, but it wasn't a success so it hasn't happened.

And back to movies like At The Earth's Core, the same studio Amicus also made lots of great little horror movies back in the day, many of them portmanteau things like Dr Terror's House Of Horrors, and The Skull, a real and rather strange neglected gem from the 60's.

_____________________________

check out more of my reviews on http://horrorcultfilms.co.uk/

(in reply to evil bill)
Post #: 14782
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 6/2/2013 9:52:24 PM   
Dr Lenera

 

Posts: 4038
Joined: 19/10/2005

quote:

ORIGINAL: dannyfletch

Sorry but I thought Looper was miles better than Timecop!
I agree that Twelve Monkeys is indeed a very good, one of the best in fact, time travel/sci-fi movie and is the better film but I really enjoyed Looper for what it is and think that it definitely deserves the praise it has been getting. You may think that it has borrowed from various other sci-fi/ time travel movies but I think it's kind of unavoidable to make a sci-fi movie or any other movie these days without having similarities to what has been made already.


Um, not sure about this. I suppose Looper is the better made film,but I suppose I got annoyed when everyone including the director were saying how original it was, and as I was watching it I saw all this stuff that had been done before in previous films. But maybe that's just because I watch too many films

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check out more of my reviews on http://horrorcultfilms.co.uk/

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Post #: 14783
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 6/2/2013 9:54:24 PM   
Dr Lenera

 

Posts: 4038
Joined: 19/10/2005

quote:

ORIGINAL: paul.mccluskey

Has anyone seen Insidious? One of the best horror films I have seen in a long time, I watched it on Saturday night. I didn't see it at the cinema as I dismissed it as a Poltergeist rip-off, but I gave it a chance as I'm an admirer of James Wan and Leigh Whannell's previous work. Spine-chilling from start to finish, with plenty of frightening moments. What I loved was that there is a build-up to each scare. Filmmakers these days tend to throw them in without thinking, but in this movie, everything was perfectly timed. The sequel should be interesting considering the main cast are returning. How they are gonna continue after that shocker of an ending is beyond me.


That film scared the shit out of me at the cinema, I remember vividly the chills running through my entire body and few films do that these days in my opinion. A really well done chiller, if in the end not very original really.

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check out more of my reviews on http://horrorcultfilms.co.uk/

(in reply to paul.mccluskey)
Post #: 14784
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 7/2/2013 8:28:37 AM   
Dr Lenera

 

Posts: 4038
Joined: 19/10/2005

quote:

ORIGINAL: DAVID GILLESPIE

Yep, I would second Danny on that one, Looper was a great movie. Certainly not perfect but did try something a little different.


The Final Member (2012) - I am getting sent a copy of this documentaty as part of the Glasgow Film Festival. It is about a man who has a museum that exhibits a plethora of penises. The documentary follows his attempts to acquire a human one.
David Cameron co-stars - only joking.


Ha ha, can't wait to read review of this!

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check out more of my reviews on http://horrorcultfilms.co.uk/

(in reply to DAVID GILLESPIE)
Post #: 14785
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 7/2/2013 5:44:12 PM   
losthighway


Posts: 3251
Joined: 25/1/2006
From: Manchesterford
Will be seeing WARM BODIES tomorrow. Currently reading the novel and have to be honest it's not grabbing me as I thought it would but the film still looks decent. Will let you know my thoughts asap.

_____________________________

The secret to becoming a star is knowing how to behave like one.

(in reply to Dr Lenera)
Post #: 14786
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 9/2/2013 3:38:00 PM   
evil bill


Posts: 6742
Joined: 19/7/2006
From: mordor/ uk
quote:

ORIGINAL: Nexus Wookie

Superb reviews for two insanely good sci-fi/time-travelling films, evil bill!

Twelve Monkeys for me, is Gilliam's last real masterpiece and one i love coming back to from time to time (see what i did there! Sorry ), and Time Cop; Van Damme's best flick by a mile...although Kickboxer comes pretty close! . I was re-watching it the other day, and was immersed in nostaligia heaven. It came out when i was still in Secondary School and i remember me and my mates went crazy for it. I still have the comic adaption that Manga released at the time (which is pretty awesome).

Thanks for sharing evil bill!.

EDIT: talking about Twelve Monkeys just reminded me; what ever happened to Madeleine Stowe? She was one of the best actresses of the 90's abd did some memorable turns in films such as Last of the Mohicans, Unlawful Entry and of course Twelve Monkeys. Man she was great..

Madeleine Stowe is indeed a fine actress, but she seems now to have a career in TV, my daughter watches a show called REVENGE (I think it's on SKY1)which she stars in, and she pops up in the odd TV movie.

quote:

paul.mccluskey
Has anyone seen Insidious? One of the best horror films I have seen in a long time, I watched it on Saturday night. I didn't see it at the cinema as I dismissed it as a Poltergeist rip-off, but I gave it a chance as I'm an admirer of James Wan and Leigh Whannell's previous work. Spine-chilling from start to finish, with plenty of frightening moments. What I loved was that there is a build-up to each scare. Filmmakers these days tend to throw them in without thinking, but in this movie, everything was perfectly timed. The sequel should be interesting considering the main cast are returning. How they are gonna continue after that shocker of an ending is beyond me.


 

Insidious (2011)

The film begins with a mysterious old woman (Philip Friedman) near an ominously lit back window,she smiles and then the screen flashes to black.A couple, Renai and Josh Lambert (Rose Byrne and Patrick Wilson), and their three kids  Foster (Andrew Astor)Dalton (Ty Simpkins), and Renai (Rose Byrne) have recently moved into a new house.They did out old family albums,the kids notice there are no pictures of Josh when he was a child, which Renai tells them that he has always been camera shy.Dalton  is scared of his new room,as books begin falling to the floor laying on the floor,later he is playing, and hears noises in the attic,terrified he tells his parents.Renai and Josh clam him down, then tuck him into bed, confident he has only been having nightmares,but the next day,Josh goes to wake Dalton, but he doesn't move. They rush him to the hospital where the doctors say he is in an unexplained coma. 3 months later, still in a coma, they bring Dalton home to care for him there,but over the next few days, escalating paranormal events begin to occur.

A wonderful haunted house chiller,that steals from so many older classic horror films,like Poltergeist,The Entity,The Haunting, The Innocents, Flatliners and even Carnival of Souls.And for some reason this mix works so well as the scares come thick and fast,all helped by the excellent editing,great direction.Full of odd camera angles,amazing cinematography,and solid production vaules,with great character development,and decent acting from all the cast.I was blowen away,i just did not think it would be this good,it is a real ghost story chiller,from a team that look like they mean to scare the pants off us.

The first half plays as a typical haunted house film,which is actually scary, and with some real suspense built into it,and moves along at a steady pace,with a script that pays homage to all those movies i mentioned.The second half steps up a gear with some disturbing images,though never extreme,they will send chills up your spine,and make you never walk alone into a darkened room.It goes full rollor coaster towards the end with a relentless rush of spine tingling scares,refusing to let you come up for air,or in most case's uncover your eyes.You just don't get a second to recover,and this is it's only real fault to me,as you end up just frozen,not in fear as you should be but,just overkilled.That said i'm sure a second viewing i'll enjoy the onslaught at the end a lot better,and it was great to hear screams of fear/fright once more in the cinema.It's been a long time coming,a chiller that delivers some great jump out of your pants moments,and how it only got 3 stars from Empire???,i'll go for four or as we score 8/10

_____________________________

"You listen to me now,i will find you and i will kill you!"

(in reply to Nexus Wookie)
Post #: 14787
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 9/2/2013 3:46:27 PM   
evil bill


Posts: 6742
Joined: 19/7/2006
From: mordor/ uk
quote:

ORIGINAL: dannyfletch

Sorry but I thought Looper was miles better than Timecop!
I agree that Twelve Monkeys is indeed a very good, one of the best in fact, time travel/sci-fi movie and is the better film but I really enjoyed Looper for what it is and think that it definitely deserves the praise it has been getting. You may think that it has borrowed from various other sci-fi/ time travel movies but I think it's kind of unavoidable to make a sci-fi movie or any other movie these days without having similarities to what has been made already.

I love Time Travel films and I did enjoy LOOPER, but it was notting new in the Sci/Fi film group where it belongs,saying that i give LOOPER 7/10.
quote:

Dr Lenera
Um, not sure about this. I suppose Looper is the better made film,but I suppose I got annoyed when everyone including the director were saying how original it was, and as I was watching it I saw all this stuff that had been done before in previous films. But maybe that's just because I watch too many films

LOOPER is the better made film, but TIMECOP was the more original with a better Director, and i'm sure if they remade Timecop it would have all the latest FX and production quality that Looper has.And yes mate we watch to many films, but then we just love this art form above all others. 

_____________________________

"You listen to me now,i will find you and i will kill you!"

(in reply to dannyfletch)
Post #: 14788
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 9/2/2013 3:54:56 PM   
evil bill


Posts: 6742
Joined: 19/7/2006
From: mordor/ uk
quote:

ORIGINAL: Dr Lenera


quote:

ORIGINAL: evil bill


CORMAN/POE
The Tomb of Ligeia (Tomb of the Cat) (1964)




Once again Corman doesn't fail his faithful Poe audience, as with his previous films the castle falls to a burning rubble as an internal and external struggle commences, good against evil, sanity slipping into madness and death and decay the order of the day. The castle itself is cob-webbed, foreboding, decadent, Gothic, dark and oppressive, with the use of shade light and colour once again adding to the dark heart that this film has. It is incredibly spooky, creepy and disturbing ,and holds you in it's tight fist like grip from beginning to end. You can sense what Verden is going through, his joyless discomfort in his new found love, that he is still haunted by the death of his first wife. I love the twist as to why Verden is missing at night and the reasons behind his lack of appearance once married to Rowena, it's so tragic and morbid, and as the mystery unravels, so do the lives of Verden and his wife. My own favourite part is of Verden doing battle with the black cat as the room collapses around him ,it is stunning, here we see a master crafts man at work, making full use of what sets and effects he could get a hold of .There's also a superb nightmare sequence where Rowena and Ligeia meet through the dangerous black cat, and the bell tower sequence where that cat leads Rowena to her possible doom is also a chilling shocker of a scene.The music is outstanding also and very suspenseful when it need's to, and during this scene it borders on nerve shredding, as Rowena awakens from the nightmare to find a dead fox staring at her, a hairbrush housing Ligeia's hair, and a bowl of milk she almost steps in, just a classic horror and shamefully in my book the last Corman/Poe film.9/10



Sad that this was the last indeed, though did you know that Witchfinder General was called The Conqueror Worm so people would think it was a Vincent Pride/ Poe movie.Like you I love Poe, and I actually hoped that the recent The Raven may have led to more films of his stuff, but it wasn't a success so it hasn't happened.

And back to movies like At The Earth's Core, the same studio Amicus also made lots of great little horror movies back in the day, many of them portmanteau things like Dr Terror's House Of Horrors, and The Skull, a real and rather strange neglected gem from the 60's.

I remember reading about Witchfinder General name change but could not remember what it was called, cheers
Loved  Dr Terror's House Of Horrors, and The Skull, just don't make horror films like that anymore, except for the odd one or two from Tim Burton like Sleepy Hallow and Dark Shadows.


_____________________________

"You listen to me now,i will find you and i will kill you!"

(in reply to Dr Lenera)
Post #: 14789
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 10/2/2013 9:07:03 AM   
dannyfletch


Posts: 651
Joined: 25/5/2008
From: Bromley
Well it's good that we all agree Looper is a decent film at least. I can see you're a Timecop fan mate but I guess that film just never quite grabbed me and felt average at best but I might give it another go sometime as it's been a few years.

(in reply to evil bill)
Post #: 14790
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