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RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 19/1/2013 5:56:44 PM   
Nexus Wookie


Posts: 2326
Joined: 24/9/2011
From: the Godcity

quote:

ORIGINAL: paul.mccluskey

Watched Dark Shadows last night. Like all of Tim Burton's movies, it's visually great, and there is a lot of black humour throughout the film, but the idea of a vampire living in the 1970s was done better during that decade. Still, the cast are great, and it's a fun watch.

Bought a number of bizarre movies on DVD in HMV today: Blood on Satan's Claw, The Devil's Men (Peter Cushing as a Satan worshipper taking on Donald Pleasence), Castle of the Living Dead (European curio starring Christopher Lee and Donald Sutherland), and the classic voodoo thriller Angel Heart.


Damn i almost forgot about this film! I really must watch it. The premise is quite intriguing


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RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 19/1/2013 9:35:37 PM   
Dr Lenera

 

Posts: 3997
Joined: 19/10/2005

quote:

ORIGINAL: losthighway

WHEN THE LIGHTS WENT OUT
 
An effective British haunted house story based on the Pontefract poltergeist legend which terrorised the Pritchard family. The attention to 70's detail is excellent and the film is creepy with some pretty decent jumps. It's just a shame the CGI ending spoils proceedings a little. The extras are also pretty good with an interview with the Maynard family who supposedly experienced similar poltergeist activity in Coventry in 2011. I'm a total sceptic but it's nice that some effort has clearly been out into the extras. This is definitely worth picking up!

Overall: 3.5/5
 
LEATHERFACE: TEXAS CHAINSAW MASSACRE III

Just watched this for the first time and despite a promising start with obvious aspirations to be like NOES, it became rather tedious and the ending was rubbish! However, there was a fairly decent 2003 documentary included as an extra where everyone was very honest about the production of the film and it's poor box office. Basically studio fiddling ruined it from the sounds of things. Anyways, the uncut version is actually pretty brutal but the film as a whole is a mess.

Overall: 1.5/5
 
THE WALKING DEAD GAME: SEASON 1
 
Finished it this afternoon and it was excellent. It's actually better than the TV show as it maintains the emotional core at the centre of the comics which the TV version has only really hit on 2-3 times over 2.5 seasons. If you've got a gaming console I seriously recommend you get this. The ending is heartbreaking and I can't wait for season 2 to arrive.

Overall: 5/5
 
And finally, MANIAC remake is out in the UK on 15th March 2013. Good times!


I have that DVD of Leatherface and it really was a mangled movie, though even if it's released form it's better than TCM: The Next Generation isn't it?

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Post #: 14732
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 19/1/2013 9:37:51 PM   
Dr Lenera

 

Posts: 3997
Joined: 19/10/2005

quote:

ORIGINAL: paul.mccluskey

Watched Dark Shadows last night. Like all of Tim Burton's movies, it's visually great, and there is a lot of black humour throughout the film, but the idea of a vampire living in the 1970s was done better during that decade. Still, the cast are great, and it's a fun watch.

Bought a number of bizarre movies on DVD in HMV today: Blood on Satan's Claw, The Devil's Men (Peter Cushing as a Satan worshipper taking on Donald Pleasence), Castle of the Living Dead (European curio starring Christopher Lee and Donald Sutherland), and the classic voodoo thriller Angel Heart.


Some cool stuff there mate, Blood on Satan's Claw is a classic, eerily atmospheric and quite perverse early 70's British horror which is the kind of thing I feel Hammer should have been making in their later years to keep up with the way horror was going.

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Post #: 14733
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 20/1/2013 1:50:53 PM   
paul.mccluskey


Posts: 5165
Joined: 15/4/2007
From: Port Glasgow, Scotland, UK
Last night, I watched Angel Heart. A film that requires patience as it is a bit slow, however it is a rather spooky film, and Alan Parker's direction is sharp throughout. Mickey Rourke delivers a compelling performance, and Robert De Niro was also excellent in his small appearance as Louis Cyphre.

< Message edited by paul.mccluskey -- 20/1/2013 7:29:39 PM >

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Post #: 14734
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 20/1/2013 3:59:42 PM   
Mister Coe

 

Posts: 1561
Joined: 20/10/2012

quote:

ORIGINAL: paul.mccluskey

Last night, I watched Angel Heart. A film that requires patience as it is a bit slow, however it is a rather spooky film, and Alan Parker's direction is sharp throughout. Mickey Rourke delivers a compelling performance, and Robert De Niro was also excellent in my small appearance as Louis Cyphre.


Angel Heart is a bloody masterpiece. Saw it as a teenager and it freaked me right out. Not seen it in a while, must make the effort.

Blood On Satans Claw... never seen it, it's one I've been meaning to get round to for many a year... any extended thoughts on this one?

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RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 20/1/2013 4:01:26 PM   
Mister Coe

 

Posts: 1561
Joined: 20/10/2012
Oh, and Paul... 'MY appearance as Louis Cypher...'

Mr De Niro, is that you? And if so, why are you making so many crappy films nowadays?



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RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 20/1/2013 5:35:57 PM   
dannyfletch


Posts: 648
Joined: 25/5/2008
From: Bromley
Have just bought a very strange sci-fi cult called Zardoz. I'm sure some of you on here have seen it. I haven't seen it in years so would like to hear some reviews and opinions?

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Post #: 14737
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 20/1/2013 7:27:42 PM   
paul.mccluskey


Posts: 5165
Joined: 15/4/2007
From: Port Glasgow, Scotland, UK
quote:

ORIGINAL: dannyfletch

Have just bought a very strange sci-fi cult called Zardoz. I'm sure some of you on here have seen it. I haven't seen it in years so would like to hear some reviews and opinions?

Sean Connery in an orange diaper. Enough said.

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Post #: 14738
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 20/1/2013 7:29:04 PM   
paul.mccluskey


Posts: 5165
Joined: 15/4/2007
From: Port Glasgow, Scotland, UK
quote:

ORIGINAL: Mister Coe

Oh, and Paul... 'MY appearance as Louis Cypher...'

Mr De Niro, is that you? And if so, why are you making so many crappy films nowadays?



Just saw that there , corrected!

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Post #: 14739
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 20/1/2013 8:18:26 PM   
dannyfletch


Posts: 648
Joined: 25/5/2008
From: Bromley
Lol, cool. Sean Connery can pretty much pull off anything. I just remember it being very strange and not making much sense. I was about 12 at the time though so 20 years later hopefully my opinion has changed.

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Post #: 14740
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 21/1/2013 11:44:32 AM   
losthighway


Posts: 3248
Joined: 25/1/2006
From: Manchesterford
quote:

I have that DVD of Leatherface and it really was a mangled movie, though even if it's released form it's better than TCM: The Next Generation isn't it?


I've not seen it! I had it in my hand along with Leatherface. It was only £1.99 and in great condition for a second hand copy but I put it back. Is it worth getting then?? The only chainsaw film I really didn't like was The Beginning, which was just awful! And I haven't seen Texas Chainsaw 3D for obvious reasons!

And Frightfest is getting Lords of Salem... jealous!!!

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Post #: 14741
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 21/1/2013 8:03:21 PM   
evil bill


Posts: 6730
Joined: 19/7/2006
From: mordor/ uk
quote:

ORIGINAL: Nexus Wookie


quote:

ORIGINAL: paul.mccluskey

Watched Dark Shadows last night. Like all of Tim Burton's movies, it's visually great, and there is a lot of black humour throughout the film, but the idea of a vampire living in the 1970s was done better during that decade. Still, the cast are great, and it's a fun watch.

Bought a number of bizarre movies on DVD in HMV today: Blood on Satan's Claw, The Devil's Men (Peter Cushing as a Satan worshipper taking on Donald Pleasence), Castle of the Living Dead (European curio starring Christopher Lee and Donald Sutherland), and the classic voodoo thriller Angel Heart.



Damn i almost forgot about this film! I really must watch it. The premise is quite intriguing


Dark Shadows is fun in places but on the whole it's one of the weaker Tim Burton films, and I gave it an average score IE 5/10, and the good Dr gave it 4.5/10, but like all Burton films it's worth watching.

quote:

paul.mccluskey
Last night, I watched Angel Heart. A film that requires patience as it is a bit slow, however it is a rather spooky film, and Alan Parker's direction is sharp throughout. Mickey Rourke delivers a compelling performance, and Robert De Niro was also excellent in his small appearance as Louis Cyphre.

Now this is a classic, brilliant horror/thriller, so here's ye old review:
 
ANGEL HEART 1987


A private investigator Harry Angel(Mickey Rourke)is hired by a mysterious and malevolent client Louis Cyphre(Robert De Niro) to find a missing crooner Jonny Favourite who owes him on a debt. Johnny's associates are populated by those into mysticism and particularly voodoo, which takes Harry to New Orleans. But when the PI starts his investigation he is thwarted by the murders of his possible witnesses and haunted by unexplainable demonic nightmares. As he nears and nears his catch, the identity of the missing person is closer to him than he thinks, and he to may become a victim.

Directed by Alan Parker who gave us some real classics like Midnight Express and The Wall, here he has his done his masterpiece, that  ranks up there with those really twisted supernatural thrillers like The Sixth Sense and Jacob's Ladder.But this is a very dark and twisted horror film that is technically breathtaking, for me it out shines these two classics. Alan Parker's direction is truly amazing, as he drives us deeper and deeper into a meticulously prepared dark story,wonderfully crafted, beautifully shot, masterfully edited, it is nothing short of mesmerizing. Parker has become the Hitchcock of his generation with this film, it is perfect in both visuals and script, and the suspense is nail biting, up there with Psycho or Rear Window.

Robert de Niro gives one of his all time best performances of his career here, right up there with Raging Bull, Cape Fear or The Godfather II, in fact for me it is his most chilling roles ever. Much of the meaning in this dark tale lies in the line's uttered by his evil character, Louis Cyphre,who turns the simple act of eating an egg into a moment of mortal dread.Then there's Mickey Rourke performance that makes this film a classic, this is his finest movie role, and he's the one who really has the hardest job, and most important job, because he needs to instil the terror in you. It's through his eyes that we witness these bizarre events unfold, and it's his reaction that makes it all the more terrifying, as we follow him to hells gates. And lets not forget the beautiful Lisa Bonet in her best role, that she has never come close to, as she under plays her part, which may sound strange if you're playing a voodoo priestess. But she's very sexy and very vulnerable here, and in the hands of a lesser actress this would not have worked, but here is a one of those moments when an actress shines.

To tell you to much about this film could spoil it for you, but what i will say is that though this psychological thriller bombed at the box office in 1987,it like many cult classics found a new audience on video, very much like Blade Runner it was just to far ahead of it's time. Unlike a lot of modern thrillers this is scary, disturbing, influential, thought-provoking, and a lot smarter and more atmospheric than most of the rip-off horror films being made today. If it had been made now it would still be a masterpiece, and I think it would have been a hit, maybe even been up for a few Oscars, it is that good. And there's the infamous, notorious controversial scenes including the most famous sequence involving Rourke and Lisa Bonet and bloody rain, which adds to the movie's moody atmosphere which is its strongest element. It will hold you in it's grip right to the shock twist ending, which to be honest i guessed ten minutes in, but still it held me in it grip and left me in deep thought about what a work of art it is. A film with great acting, script, visuals, direction, production and stand out score, is a rare thing even now, but there are cult gems that still shine, and this is one of the great cult films that must be seen.9/10

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Post #: 14742
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 21/1/2013 8:34:37 PM   
evil bill


Posts: 6730
Joined: 19/7/2006
From: mordor/ uk
quote:

ORIGINAL: dannyfletch

Have just bought a very strange sci-fi cult called Zardoz. I'm sure some of you on here have seen it. I haven't seen it in years so would like to hear some reviews and opinions?

Zardoz (1974)


In the distant future Earth is divided into two camps, the barely civilized group and the overly civilized one with mental powers. A plague is attacking the second group, after which its members cease to have any interest in life and become nearly catatonic. When Zed an Exterminator-class brutal who worships the stone head Zardoz, comes upon an old library where a mysterious stranger teaches him how to read.And reveals Zardoz's secrets, which could bring about the fall of all life in The Vortex and lead Zed to giving the immortals, the gift of death.

This is a classic cult science fiction tale woven into a complex complicated tapestry, about the end of civilization's, immortality, genetic manipulation, artificial intelligence, time control, psychic power, space travel, and so much more. If you're the least bit interested in science-fiction, there's more for you in this one movie than you'll find in a year's worth of  the latest Sci/Fi epic, though it is pretty crazy, and hard going so it is not surprising movie goers get confused by the movie. The low budget special effects and cheesiness can be annoying, but this is back in a time of no CGI, and unless you had $10 million or more to spare you had to make do, saying that it will put many off giving this film a chance. After all the notion of a floating head issuing commands to armed barbarians is a ridiculous idea, isn't or is it, well maybe not, think of the troops now battling overseas who are labelled as brutal Barbarians, as they're issued commands by distant leaders safe miles away or speaking to them behind protective measures. And this was made in 1974,how things haven't changed, as suits decide who lives and who dies, as they use the latest technology to kill from a distant.Back then in the 70's it was Vietnam now Afgainestasn .

On first viewing Zardoz makes no sense at all, but is so wonderfully weird, a so bad it's good film, which will only appeal to hard core Sci/Fi fans, or those that enjoy this thread.It may be low budget and cheesy, but it has a great message if you can get over the cheesiness, and the fact it looks like a reject of Blakes Seven I the effects department. But overall it will get you thinking, and that's what great story's/ films are supposed to do, even if it seems the director and screenwriter must have been high on LSD or some other mind-bending drug. It will take a second viewing for you to get what it's about, and seeing 007 in next to notting will give you a laugh, along with the other actors, Connery must have wonder what the hell he had got himself into. Well for the record this is one weird/strange film, and this is the home of such films,so give it a go you may just enjoy it, and you will end up with that feeling of being Mind-F***ed, but you will open your eyes and see it as a film that's message has not changed in a world that has not changed. 7/10

_____________________________

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Post #: 14743
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 21/1/2013 9:00:45 PM   
Dr Lenera

 

Posts: 3997
Joined: 19/10/2005
Having briefly read the posts on here last night I almost said "I bet Evil Bill has got a review of Zardoz knocking about".

And Bill, I'll get round to the Corman/Poe films one day, am caught up with doing stuff on HCF - Hitchcock's films [will start posting them on one of the Empire threads soon, it just takes time], Universal horror [almost finished], Godzilla, and will start Hammer soon.

Anyway, I did go see




In 1858, several male slaves are chained and being transported after being purchased at an auction in Texas by the Speck brothers. Among the slaves is Django, who has been sold away from his wife, Broomhilda. Except for Django, the slaves are freed by Dr. King Schultz, a German immigrant dentist and bounty hunter. Schultz reveals that he sought out Django to aid him in identifying the Brittle brothers, a trio of ruthless killers working for a plantation owner. The two come to an agreement: in exchange for helping locate the Brittle brothers, Schultz will free Django from slavery and give him $75 and a horse. After they hunt down and kill the Brittle brothers, Schultz takes Django on as his associate in bounty hunting, but what Django really wants is to find and save Broomhilda….



It’s often a rather nice feeling when you are proved wrong about something. After two weak films I was starting to write Tim Burton off as a great filmmaker and then along came Frankenweenie which restored my faith in the weird director. As for Quentin Tarantino; well, an article I wrote for this very website [ http://horrorcultfilms.co.uk/2012/04/whatever-happened-to-quentin-tarantino-friday-feature/] will tell you how I think he has become a somewhat tedious writer/director whose films are increasingly: Steal from/ homage to a cool cult movie Tarantino likes-acres of dreary dialogue-another steal from / homage to a cool cult movie Tarantino likes-more acres of dreary dialogue etc. The great days when Tarantino was the coolest filmmaker on the planet seem long gone and I now await each new movie from him with trepidation. I could almost have written some of my review of Django Unchained before even seeing the film. “You’d get more enjoyment from ten minutes of one of Franco Nero’s original Spaghetti Westerns”. “Dull and tedious”. “Filled with film references that kept taking me out of the film”. That kind of thing.

Well……actually, I was wrong. A few minutes into Django Unchained and I realised I had to re-evaluate my view of Tarantino. It’s no masterpiece, and still doesn’t approach the unrepeatable brilliance of Reservoir Dogs and Pulp Fiction, but I reckon it’s his best work since those classics. It’s a gloriously bonkers melding of revenge Western [especially of the Italian kind] and slave drama a la Mandingo. One of the things that most pleased me about it is that for once it doesn’t feel like much of it is made up of bits from other movies. It may be called Django Unchained [a play on Hercules Unchained maybe?], but it doesn’t really bear much resemblance to the many films made in Italy featuring the character of the same name, the first of which was banned for 27 years in the UK. Certain elements reminded of films like Boss Nigger and The Great Silence, but in no way during Django Unchained was I playing Spot The Steal. I would say that this means that Tarantino has grown up, but I don’t think that’s true overall. Things like his ramshackle pacing, very black humour and gleefully graphic violence are still present and correct, and for good or bad it wouldn’t be a proper Tarantino film without those would it?

The first hour really is fantastic. Jamie Foxx, never an actor I’ve really rated, and Christoph Waltz, who was born to speak Tarantino’s dialogue and is simply fabulous throughout this movie, which would be worth watching again just to study how detailed his performance is, are a terrific duo as they go around shooting freeing slaves and shooting villains. There have been many complaints about this film about it being offensive to black people. I don’t see it myself; the film shows in often nasty detail how badly blacks were treated by whites, and while it does have humour, it never mocks the slaves or their situations. Though I am white myself, I felt allowed to cheer if I wanted to at the sight of black folks wasting nasty white folks and much of the first third of the film is quite rousing. It also contains two simply brilliant sequences which really proves that Tarantino has got much of his mojo back. The first is a really chilling and suspenseful one concerning an attempt to shoot a man whose son is with him. The second involves a group of Ku Klux Khan who find they cannot see properly with their hoods, and is uproariously funny while also very clever in making us feel okay in laughing at something which in reality is not very amusing at all.

What seems like Tarantino’s fastest paced film since Kill Bill: Volume One slackens considerably after nearly an hour where the action relocates to a particularly nasty plantation. The characters talk and talk, and though the performances are all richly nuanced and this is one of the things Tarantino does, it feels like we are in a totally different film to what we have seen before. After a while he seems to wilfully be stretching things out, to the point of testing the audience, but he does reward them with some strikingly bloody shootouts which are some of the best staged and edited I’ve seen in ages, thrillingly fast but still shot so that you can see what is going on, a rarity these days. The red stuff, which as usual doesn’t look like CG, is sprayed everywhere in a film which makes its violence as brutal as possible, though at times Tarantino seems to have learnt how to be subtle. I don’t know if hardly showing a slave being torn apart from dogs and focusing instead on the faces of the people watching was a way of avoiding censorship or not, but the approach really works for the scene even if a bit of sick ‘old me thought nostalgically of how someone like Lucio Fulci [who made Westerns too though he’s not known for it] would have approached the scene!

Maybe it’s because of all the poorly directed films from the likes of Tom Hooper I’ve watched recently, but Django Unchained really does show Tarantino as a master of pacing scenes, and, while he will never be regarded as a visual stylist outside of mimicking stuff in other films [which as I’ve said he doesn’t do much of here], he uses different angles and things like close-ups very well, really enhancing moments. Brief flashbacks seem to be shot with bleached colour, though my favourite of these was a beautifully simple three or four second bit of Django’s wife where Django says what may have been the first words he ever said to her. Of course the film is still packed with things like more ‘hero’ shots than it can really take. The most irritating thing about Django Unchained is its soundtrack, which is the usual Tarantino mix of film music cues and songs. I guess the reason I have a problem with this is that I have a great interest in film music and have heard and bought far too much of it. The music, much of it from Spaghetti Westerns, does go with the images and it’s cool I suppose that, for instance, Tarantino decided not to use the main title version of the theme from Two Mules For Sister Sara but went with a slightly different arrangement heard in the actual film, but such stuff just takes me out of the film. My ‘bad’ I guess.

Though it features lots of fine acting [we'll ignore Tarantino's frankly bizarre part] and even an appearance by Franco Nero himself looking distinctly younger than 73, the stand-out for me after Waltz is the guy who plays the most horrible, reprehensible human being I have seen in a film for ages. That guy is Samuel L. Jackson, and he makes his character so repulsive that I wanted to throw something at the screen, yet he makes him real too and we are even allowed to laugh at him. It’s a truly outstanding combination of good writing and acting in a film which really does show the depths of human evil, an evil which really existed and shows mankind at its very lowest. That a film featuring such evil is also so entertaining is bound to upset the politically sensitive types. Tarantino doesn’t do careful or sensitive, and can be criticised for going too far, but I think in a strange way Django Unchained has more to say about humanity, and is more able to say it, then worthy efforts like Amistad. I really think it could have done with a bit of reshaping and smoothing out, but Django Unchained really made me re-think my opinion on a filmmaker I had lost faith in. Yes, I feel happy to have been proven wrong.

8/10

< Message edited by Dr Lenera -- 21/1/2013 9:08:57 PM >


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check out more of my reviews on http://horrorcultfilms.co.uk/

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Post #: 14744
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 21/1/2013 9:30:03 PM   
Nexus Wookie


Posts: 2326
Joined: 24/9/2011
From: the Godcity
Reading your review for Django was an absolute pleasure Dr. Lenera! I too had lost a little faith in Tarantino if i'm honest (although i did derive a lot of enjoyment from his Kill Bill double bill) but Death Proof was a disappointment, and Inglorius Basterd's while entertaining, felt too much of a homage piece to other film-makers than something original as his earlier efforts. But you've really convinced me to go and see this. For that you have my biggest thanks.

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RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 22/1/2013 5:10:20 PM   
DAVID GILLESPIE


Posts: 2888
Joined: 27/2/2007
From: Glasgow
From Beyond (1986)
Directed by: Stuart Gordon
Written by: Dennis Paoli, HP Lovecraft
Starring: Barbara Crampton, Jeffrey Combs, Ken Foree, Ted Sorel


Running Time: 86 mins

Certification: 18

The 1980's were a dream for fans of gory and gooey horror films with makeup effects, rather than CGI, being used to thrill the audience. Directors such as Sam Raimi, John Carpenter, David Cronenberg and George Romero all contributed genre classics throughout this decade.

Following up on the success of the hugely enjoyable Reanimator and with a significantly larger budget, Stuart Gordon revisits HP Lovecraft's work with From Beyond. It features all the winning ingredients of Reanimator including mad scientists, unholy creatures, gore, laughs and damsels in undress¡­.. I mean distress.

The story begins with two scientists attempting to stimulate the pineal gland with a mysterious device called The Resonator. Dr Edward Pretorius (Ted Sorel) is the creator of the device that allows those within range to glance into other dimensions. Pretorius is arrogant, narcissistic and eager to push forward with the experiments. His assistant, Crawford Tillinghast (Jeffrey Combs) is more reserved and warns that they should tread more carefully after a close encounter with a flying, slug-like creature.

After complaints of strange noises by neighbours, the police find Tillinghast fleeing the building with an axe in his hand. Pretorius is found decapitated in the laboratory with the blame being placed on his work colleague. Tillinghast is rushed to a mental hospital and is treated by the beautiful, Dr Katherine McMichaels (Barbara Crampton). After listening to his story, a brain scan reveals that the scientist's pineal gland has indeed grown to an abnormal size. McMichaels returns to the laboratory with the scientist and Detective Brownlee (Ken Foree) to inspect the Resonator. When the device is activated, Pretorius appears but is made out of some sort of protoplasmic matter. He informs Bubba, Crawford and Katherine that there is a world that exists that is more pleasurable than our own reality. When he attacks them, Tillinghast manages to shut temorarily turn off the power. Rather than take the scientist's advice, McMichaels returns to the Resonator keen to experience the addictive effects of its power. A deformed Edward returns from beyond, rips off her clothes and attempts to devour her mind. Meanwhile Bubba and Crawford run to the basement to shut off the power for good but are attacked by a huge and rather grumpy, worm monster. Although they succeed in cutting the power supply, Tillinghurst is badly wounded. His pineal gland swells to such a proportion that it pops out of his head like a finger. McMichaels realises that the Resonator must be destroyed before Pretorius finds a way to open the portal for good.

From Beyond is a blast. It is short, hilarious and gruesome fun. There might be very little scares on offer but the story always holds your interest with a plethora of icky, imaginative creatures crawling around. The film rushes through at break-neck speed with almost no time to stop and take breath.

There are also some memorable sequences. For the men, we get to see the lovely Barbara Crampton dressing up in a selection of leather S&M gear and for the ladies, they get to see Ken Foree prance about in his tight, red pants. Ted Sorel also gets to use his expandable fingers to do something very naughty indeed to the naked Crampton. Jeffrey Combs is always a blast and really hams it up in the final quarter when he gets to suck eyeballs and chomp brains.

From Beyond is a welcoming return to the glory days of horror. It is the perfect companion for a night in with a six-pack and dodgy curry

Rating 7.5/10 Beer Movie Rating 5/5

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Post #: 14746
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 22/1/2013 5:12:30 PM   
DAVID GILLESPIE


Posts: 2888
Joined: 27/2/2007
From: Glasgow

quote:

ORIGINAL: Nexus Wookie

Reading your review for Django was an absolute pleasure Dr. Lenera! I too had lost a little faith in Tarantino if i'm honest (although i did derive a lot of enjoyment from his Kill Bill double bill) but Death Proof was a disappointment, and Inglorius Basterd's while entertaining, felt too much of a homage piece to other film-makers than something original as his earlier efforts. But you've really convinced me to go and see this. For that you have my biggest thanks.


A great review for an excellent film. Certainly Tarantino's most enjoyable project for some time with an adrenaline pumping, shootout in the final quarter.

_____________________________

Cludge Judge * Cold Fish

(in reply to Nexus Wookie)
Post #: 14747
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 22/1/2013 6:41:27 PM   
evil bill


Posts: 6730
Joined: 19/7/2006
From: mordor/ uk
quote:

ORIGINAL: Dr Lenera

Having briefly read the posts on here last night I almost said "I bet Evil Bill has got a review of Zardoz knocking about".

And Bill, I'll get round to the Corman/Poe films one day, am caught up with doing stuff on HCF - Hitchcock's films [will start posting them on one of the Empire threads soon, it just takes time], Universal horror [almost finished], Godzilla, and will start Hammer soon.

Anyway, I did go see





Though it features lots of fine acting [we'll ignore Tarantino's frankly bizarre part] and even an appearance by Franco Nero himself looking distinctly younger than 73, the stand-out for me after Waltz is the guy who plays the most horrible, reprehensible human being I have seen in a film for ages. That guy is Samuel L. Jackson, and he makes his character so repulsive that I wanted to throw something at the screen, yet he makes him real too and we are even allowed to laugh at him. It's a truly outstanding combination of good writing and acting in a film which really does show the depths of human evil, an evil which really existed and shows mankind at its very lowest. That a film featuring such evil is also so entertaining is bound to upset the politically sensitive types. Tarantino doesn't do careful or sensitive, and can be criticised for going too far, but I think in a strange way Django Unchained has more to say about humanity, and is more able to say it, then worthy efforts like Amistad. I really think it could have done with a bit of reshaping and smoothing out, but Django Unchained really made me re-think my opinion on a filmmaker I had lost faith in. Yes, I feel happy to have been proven wrong.

8/10

Well you just know I have a pile up of old reviews hidden around the net, though ZARDOZ was buried deep on here, and I did tidy it up, as it was a lot shorter review and a bit of a mess to be honest.
Look forward to your Hitchcock reviews, and it's the film of the great man I want to see this year along with Django Unchained. So i'm glad Tarantino is back to some original work, though I have to say I've enjoyed most of his films after Pulp Fiction a lot more than you, but not Jackie Brown, it sucked. The missus is looking forward to this one too. like me she is a big fan of big mouth and his films, though she hated Kill Bill, which I love, just shows we all can't love every single film the same as are friends/family even on this thread.

_____________________________

"You listen to me now,i will find you and i will kill you!"

(in reply to Dr Lenera)
Post #: 14748
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 22/1/2013 9:05:42 PM   
evil bill


Posts: 6730
Joined: 19/7/2006
From: mordor/ uk
quote:

ORIGINAL: DAVID GILLESPIE

From Beyond (1986)
Directed by: Stuart Gordon
Written by: Dennis Paoli, HP Lovecraft
Starring: Barbara Crampton, Jeffrey Combs, Ken Foree, Ted Sorel



From Beyond is a blast. It is short, hilarious and gruesome fun. There might be very little scares on offer but the story always holds your interest with a plethora of icky, imaginative creatures crawling around. The film rushes through at break-neck speed with almost no time to stop and take breath.

There are also some memorable sequences. For the men, we get to see the lovely Barbara Crampton dressing up in a selection of leather S&M gear and for the ladies, they get to see Ken Foree prance about in his tight, red pants. Ted Sorel also gets to use his expandable fingers to do something very naughty indeed to the naked Crampton. Jeffrey Combs is always a blast and really hams it up in the final quarter when he gets to suck eyeballs and chomp brains.

From Beyond is a welcoming return to the glory days of horror. It is the perfect companion for a night in with a six-pack and dodgy curry

Rating 7.5/10 Beer Movie Rating 5/5

Great review of a excellent Lovecraft Film, and one superb cult classic horror, which leads me on too:
CORMAN/POE the AIP years.

Prince Prospero (Vincent Price) is an evil tyrant who hates his citizens and thinks nothing of burning their village to the ground. Holding a weekend get-together for his noble acquaintances, he discovers that the Red Death has manifested itself in the village around his castle. He kidnaps the beautiful Francesca (Jane Asher), her lover Gino, and her father and keeps them in the castle with him. Prospero is a Satan worshipper as well and forces the princess, Juliana, to brand herself with an upside-down cross and sets his falcon on her when he feels like it. All the while, the Red Death decimates the land outside the castle. Prospero orders his guests to attend a masked ball and, amidst a general atmosphere of debauchery and depravity, notices the entry of a mysterious hooded stranger dressed all in red. Believing the figure to be his master, Satan, Prospero is horrified at the revelation of his true identity.

Am I glad I re watched this one to do this review, for I am now totally in love with this awesome horror film(it's always been a favourite Poe film), it is a true Classic, and as far as i'm concerned, it's Producer-director Roger Corman's best film of his career, aided by the wonderful surreal cinematography of Nicolas Roeg, who would go on and direct his own films like Performance, Don't Look Now and The Man Who Fell To Earth, which are classics in there own right. The Gothic setting and set's where all filmed in Britain, and once again this looks like a mulit million dollar film, not the low budget affair that it was, it also has a  Shakespearian tone with a very dark Satanic under current that bubbles up i9n some truly unevereing scenes. Another great surprise is that this is the only one of all his Poe films, where the  plot adaption is from the original Poe story, though for a full length feature film it had to be expanded, but it's screenwriter Charles Beaumont did this without taking it out of the bounds of Poe's dark vision.

Add to this Vincent Price gives away one of the most stunning performances of his career, he just oozes evil in fact a career best, with superb deep dialogue, that let him tear the screen apart, and for me no one will ever in any remake match or even come close to his lord of evil. Now this could have become to much ham if Vincent was left to just burn the screen down with his almost Shakespearian rants of foul evil venom, but this is a story of good versus evil at it's heart. So just to help we have Jane Asher giving an incredible performance as Francesca, the beautiful good village girl who refuses to be cowed or corrupted by the suave, satanic lord. Though so waif-like and fragile that she could almost be a child, the beautiful redhead has the courage of her convictions and the real dignity of innocence, to combat this evil force. Like in an early scene where she is roughly undressed by handmaidens and forced into a hot bath in order to become more ladylike,this is a pretty steamy sensual scene yet, Francesca still has that innocence and dignity intact as the evil lord leers at her in her wet towel, it is here we know he will lose, and she will save her people. There is also a fine supporting cast that are all British, like  Hazel Court as the would-be Bride of Satan Juliana,Hammer's resident scream queen, though she has little to do here, it is still good to see her in this classic, and also of note is Patrick Magee as the corrupt Alfredo who is on form here adding to the fun. 

All in it is Corman's direction that takes us on this dark Gothic journey, with his filmmaking techniques no longer even slightly looking low budget ,for it is obvious that he has developed a taste for great use of colour, lighting which add to it's dark surreal atmosphere. This truly the work of a master of horror, a director/producer who knows his genre, and who is never afraid to experiment, with some great knock down dead scenes, that like nightmares will linger in your head long after you watch this masterclass of gothic horror.The final images of the film set during the masque are breathtakingly full of coloured rooms that add to the corruption that surrounds the evil lord, as the camera takes us on a hell ride towards a blowout ending.With the excellent chilling dwarf's revenge on Alfredo during the masque,as chilling as anything which came before in films such as Freaks(1932).With it's striking visuals, an intriguing plot, good acting, suspense, plenty of atmosphere, and some striking dream-like imagery' it can be compared to Bergman's Seventh Seal. Yes i've mentioned these classic's, and I could name a few others that i'm sure some of Corman ideas came from, but in the end this is a Corman film, that like Carpenter, Romero, and Argento who came after him, you know when you see his name in the opening credits there is no other like him. This is a Corman/Poe masterpiece, a superb horror film that has not aged, as it looks as good as it ever did, in fact I want/need a Blu-ray of this one, as good as ye old DVD disc is with it's Dolby surround soundtrack, which I nearly forgot to mention, it's bloody brilliant, enough said get this classic if your a true fan of horror.10/10  

_____________________________

"You listen to me now,i will find you and i will kill you!"

(in reply to DAVID GILLESPIE)
Post #: 14749
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 23/1/2013 10:41:02 AM   
dannyfletch


Posts: 648
Joined: 25/5/2008
From: Bromley
Thanks for your splendid review there mate :-) I have watched it and it does indeed need a second watch. I remember not liking it much when I was a kid but now I seemed to have quite enjoyed it for the crazy ass film it is! All in all I think it was a very bold and ambitious film, wether the makers were on drugs or not lol. A true cult classic that will certainly not appeal to a wide audience and does indeed belong on this thread. I just knew that Sean Connery could pull off running around in a red nappy lol. Zed the exterminator is a legend!

(in reply to evil bill)
Post #: 14750
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 23/1/2013 2:25:13 PM   
paul.mccluskey


Posts: 5165
Joined: 15/4/2007
From: Port Glasgow, Scotland, UK
Arrow have announced new releases on Dual Format Blu-ray and DVD.

First up is George A. Romero's Knightriders, which will be available on 22nd April. Extras include:

- High Definition Blu-ray (1080p) and Standard Definition DVD presentation
- Optional English SDH subtitles for the deaf and hard of hearing
- Audio commentary with George Romero, Tom Savini, John Amplas and Christine Romero
- The Genesis of a Legend – Star Ed Harris remembers his first leading role
- A Date with Destiny – Co-star Tom Savini reflects on Knightriders
- Medieval Maiden – An interview with actress Patricia Tallman
- Theatrical Trailer
- TV Spots
- Reversible sleeve featuring original and newly commissioned artwork by Nat Marsh
- Collector’s booklet featuring new writing on the film by author and critic Brad Stevens, an archival interview with Romero and a new interview with composer Donald Rubinstein, illustrated with original archive stills and posters



Next is Motel Hell, due on 13th May. Special features are:

- High Definition Blu-ray (1080p) and Standard Definition DVD presentation of the film
- Optional English SDH subtitles for the deaf and hard of hearing
- Audio commentary with director Kevin Connor moderated by Calum Waddell
- Another Head on the Chopping Block: Interview with star Paul Linke
- From Glamour to Gore: Interview with co-star, and former Playboy Playmate, Rosanne Katon
- Ida, Be Thy Name: A look back at Motel Hell’s frightful female protagonist Ida Smith – and the secrets of creating a convincing slasher siren, with Scream Queens Elissa Dowling and Chantelle Albers, genre commentator Staci Layne Wilson and critic Shelagh Rowan-Legg
- Back to the Backwoods: Director Dave Parker (The Hills Run Red) speaks about the importance of Motel Hell
- Original Trailer
- Reversible sleeve featuring original and newly commissioned artwork by Jeff Zornow
- Collector’s booklet featuring new writing on the film by Kim Newman, illustrated with original archive stills and posters



Brian De Palma's psycho-thriller, Blow Out, will be available as both a limited edition steelbook and standard edition on 27th May. Special features at the time of going to press are:

- New, restored digital transfer, supervised and approved by director Brian De Palma
- Original Dolby 2.0 DTS-HD Master Audio
- Optional English SDH subtitles for the deaf and hard of hearing
- Black and White in Colour: An Interview with cinematographer Vilmos Zsigmond
- Rag Doll Memories: Nancy Allen on Blow Out
- Return to Philadelphia: An interview with Producer George Litto
- A gallery of on-set photos by photographer Louis Goldman
- Original Theatrical Trailer
- Collector’s booklet featuring new writing on the film by Michael Atkinson, a conversation between Quentin Tarantino and Brian De Palma and more to be confirmed!



Finally, Spider Baby, dubbed "the maddest story ever told", will be available on 24th June. Extras at the moment include:

- High Definition Blu-ray (1080p) and Standard Definition DVD presentation of the main feature, available in the UK for the first time
- High Definition transfer of the feature approved by director Jack Hill
- Isolated Music and Effects track
- English SDH subtitles for deaf and hearing impaired
- Audio commentary featuring Jack Hill and star Sid Haig
- The Hatching of Spider Baby – Interviews with Jack Hill, Sid Haig, star Mary Mitchel, fan Joe Dante and more on the making of the film
- Spider Stravinsky: The Cinema Sounds of Ronald Stein – The composer of ‘The Terror’ and ‘Attack of the 50 Foot Woman’ among others is remembered by Harlene Stein, Jack Hill, American Cinematheque’s Chris D. and others
- The Merrye House Revisited – Jack Hill revisits the original house that was used as the main location in the film
- Alternate opening title sequence
- Extended scene
- Gallery of behind-the-scenes images
- The Host (1960) – Jack Hill’s early short film featuring Sid Haig in his first starring role [30 mins]
- Reversible sleeve featuring original and newly commissioned artwork by Graham Humpreys
- Collector’s booklet featuring new writing on the film by artist and writer Stephen R. Bissette, and more to be confirmed!


(in reply to dannyfletch)
Post #: 14751
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 24/1/2013 6:11:42 PM   
Dr Lenera

 

Posts: 3997
Joined: 19/10/2005

quote:

ORIGINAL: Nexus Wookie

Reading your review for Django was an absolute pleasure Dr. Lenera! I too had lost a little faith in Tarantino if i'm honest (although i did derive a lot of enjoyment from his Kill Bill double bill) but Death Proof was a disappointment, and Inglorius Basterd's while entertaining, felt too much of a homage piece to other film-makers than something original as his earlier efforts. But you've really convinced me to go and see this. For that you have my biggest thanks.


Thanks very much, it's always pleasing to read kind comments like this.....I just hope now you like the film nowv I've convinced you to see it!

_____________________________

check out more of my reviews on http://horrorcultfilms.co.uk/

(in reply to Nexus Wookie)
Post #: 14752
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 24/1/2013 6:13:17 PM   
Dr Lenera

 

Posts: 3997
Joined: 19/10/2005

quote:

ORIGINAL: DAVID GILLESPIE

From Beyond (1986)
Directed by: Stuart Gordon
Written by: Dennis Paoli, HP Lovecraft
Starring: Barbara Crampton, Jeffrey Combs, Ken Foree, Ted Sorel


Running Time: 86 mins

Certification: 18

The 1980's were a dream for fans of gory and gooey horror films with makeup effects, rather than CGI, being used to thrill the audience. Directors such as Sam Raimi, John Carpenter, David Cronenberg and George Romero all contributed genre classics throughout this decade.

Following up on the success of the hugely enjoyable Reanimator and with a significantly larger budget, Stuart Gordon revisits HP Lovecraft's work with From Beyond. It features all the winning ingredients of Reanimator including mad scientists, unholy creatures, gore, laughs and damsels in undress¡­.. I mean distress.

The story begins with two scientists attempting to stimulate the pineal gland with a mysterious device called The Resonator. Dr Edward Pretorius (Ted Sorel) is the creator of the device that allows those within range to glance into other dimensions. Pretorius is arrogant, narcissistic and eager to push forward with the experiments. His assistant, Crawford Tillinghast (Jeffrey Combs) is more reserved and warns that they should tread more carefully after a close encounter with a flying, slug-like creature.

After complaints of strange noises by neighbours, the police find Tillinghast fleeing the building with an axe in his hand. Pretorius is found decapitated in the laboratory with the blame being placed on his work colleague. Tillinghast is rushed to a mental hospital and is treated by the beautiful, Dr Katherine McMichaels (Barbara Crampton). After listening to his story, a brain scan reveals that the scientist's pineal gland has indeed grown to an abnormal size. McMichaels returns to the laboratory with the scientist and Detective Brownlee (Ken Foree) to inspect the Resonator. When the device is activated, Pretorius appears but is made out of some sort of protoplasmic matter. He informs Bubba, Crawford and Katherine that there is a world that exists that is more pleasurable than our own reality. When he attacks them, Tillinghast manages to shut temorarily turn off the power. Rather than take the scientist's advice, McMichaels returns to the Resonator keen to experience the addictive effects of its power. A deformed Edward returns from beyond, rips off her clothes and attempts to devour her mind. Meanwhile Bubba and Crawford run to the basement to shut off the power for good but are attacked by a huge and rather grumpy, worm monster. Although they succeed in cutting the power supply, Tillinghurst is badly wounded. His pineal gland swells to such a proportion that it pops out of his head like a finger. McMichaels realises that the Resonator must be destroyed before Pretorius finds a way to open the portal for good.

From Beyond is a blast. It is short, hilarious and gruesome fun. There might be very little scares on offer but the story always holds your interest with a plethora of icky, imaginative creatures crawling around. The film rushes through at break-neck speed with almost no time to stop and take breath.

There are also some memorable sequences. For the men, we get to see the lovely Barbara Crampton dressing up in a selection of leather S&M gear and for the ladies, they get to see Ken Foree prance about in his tight, red pants. Ted Sorel also gets to use his expandable fingers to do something very naughty indeed to the naked Crampton. Jeffrey Combs is always a blast and really hams it up in the final quarter when he gets to suck eyeballs and chomp brains.

From Beyond is a welcoming return to the glory days of horror. It is the perfect companion for a night in with a six-pack and dodgy curry

Rating 7.5/10 Beer Movie Rating 5/5


Great review of a totally bonkers and somewhat neglected highlight of 80's horror, as you say such fun.

_____________________________

check out more of my reviews on http://horrorcultfilms.co.uk/

(in reply to DAVID GILLESPIE)
Post #: 14753
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 24/1/2013 6:19:43 PM   
Dr Lenera

 

Posts: 3997
Joined: 19/10/2005

quote:

ORIGINAL: evil bill

quote:

ORIGINAL: DAVID GILLESPIE

From Beyond (1986)
Directed by: Stuart Gordon
Written by: Dennis Paoli, HP Lovecraft
Starring: Barbara Crampton, Jeffrey Combs, Ken Foree, Ted Sorel



From Beyond is a blast. It is short, hilarious and gruesome fun. There might be very little scares on offer but the story always holds your interest with a plethora of icky, imaginative creatures crawling around. The film rushes through at break-neck speed with almost no time to stop and take breath.

There are also some memorable sequences. For the men, we get to see the lovely Barbara Crampton dressing up in a selection of leather S&M gear and for the ladies, they get to see Ken Foree prance about in his tight, red pants. Ted Sorel also gets to use his expandable fingers to do something very naughty indeed to the naked Crampton. Jeffrey Combs is always a blast and really hams it up in the final quarter when he gets to suck eyeballs and chomp brains.

From Beyond is a welcoming return to the glory days of horror. It is the perfect companion for a night in with a six-pack and dodgy curry

Rating 7.5/10 Beer Movie Rating 5/5

Great review of a excellent Lovecraft Film, and one superb cult classic horror, which leads me on too:
CORMAN/POE the AIP years.

Prince Prospero (Vincent Price) is an evil tyrant who hates his citizens and thinks nothing of burning their village to the ground. Holding a weekend get-together for his noble acquaintances, he discovers that the Red Death has manifested itself in the village around his castle. He kidnaps the beautiful Francesca (Jane Asher), her lover Gino, and her father and keeps them in the castle with him. Prospero is a Satan worshipper as well and forces the princess, Juliana, to brand herself with an upside-down cross and sets his falcon on her when he feels like it. All the while, the Red Death decimates the land outside the castle. Prospero orders his guests to attend a masked ball and, amidst a general atmosphere of debauchery and depravity, notices the entry of a mysterious hooded stranger dressed all in red. Believing the figure to be his master, Satan, Prospero is horrified at the revelation of his true identity.

Am I glad I re watched this one to do this review, for I am now totally in love with this awesome horror film(it's always been a favourite Poe film), it is a true Classic, and as far as i'm concerned, it's Producer-director Roger Corman's best film of his career, aided by the wonderful surreal cinematography of Nicolas Roeg, who would go on and direct his own films like Performance, Don't Look Now and The Man Who Fell To Earth, which are classics in there own right. The Gothic setting and set's where all filmed in Britain, and once again this looks like a mulit million dollar film, not the low budget affair that it was, it also has a  Shakespearian tone with a very dark Satanic under current that bubbles up i9n some truly unevereing scenes. Another great surprise is that this is the only one of all his Poe films, where the  plot adaption is from the original Poe story, though for a full length feature film it had to be expanded, but it's screenwriter Charles Beaumont did this without taking it out of the bounds of Poe's dark vision.

Add to this Vincent Price gives away one of the most stunning performances of his career, he just oozes evil in fact a career best, with superb deep dialogue, that let him tear the screen apart, and for me no one will ever in any remake match or even come close to his lord of evil. Now this could have become to much ham if Vincent was left to just burn the screen down with his almost Shakespearian rants of foul evil venom, but this is a story of good versus evil at it's heart. So just to help we have Jane Asher giving an incredible performance as Francesca, the beautiful good village girl who refuses to be cowed or corrupted by the suave, satanic lord. Though so waif-like and fragile that she could almost be a child, the beautiful redhead has the courage of her convictions and the real dignity of innocence, to combat this evil force. Like in an early scene where she is roughly undressed by handmaidens and forced into a hot bath in order to become more ladylike,this is a pretty steamy sensual scene yet, Francesca still has that innocence and dignity intact as the evil lord leers at her in her wet towel, it is here we know he will lose, and she will save her people. There is also a fine supporting cast that are all British, like  Hazel Court as the would-be Bride of Satan Juliana,Hammer's resident scream queen, though she has little to do here, it is still good to see her in this classic, and also of note is Patrick Magee as the corrupt Alfredo who is on form here adding to the fun. 

All in it is Corman's direction that takes us on this dark Gothic journey, with his filmmaking techniques no longer even slightly looking low budget ,for it is obvious that he has developed a taste for great use of colour, lighting which add to it's dark surreal atmosphere. This truly the work of a master of horror, a director/producer who knows his genre, and who is never afraid to experiment, with some great knock down dead scenes, that like nightmares will linger in your head long after you watch this masterclass of gothic horror.The final images of the film set during the masque are breathtakingly full of coloured rooms that add to the corruption that surrounds the evil lord, as the camera takes us on a hell ride towards a blowout ending.With the excellent chilling dwarf's revenge on Alfredo during the masque,as chilling as anything which came before in films such as Freaks(1932).With it's striking visuals, an intriguing plot, good acting, suspense, plenty of atmosphere, and some striking dream-like imagery' it can be compared to Bergman's Seventh Seal. Yes i've mentioned these classic's, and I could name a few others that i'm sure some of Corman ideas came from, but in the end this is a Corman film, that like Carpenter, Romero, and Argento who came after him, you know when you see his name in the opening credits there is no other like him. This is a Corman/Poe masterpiece, a superb horror film that has not aged, as it looks as good as it ever did, in fact I want/need a Blu-ray of this one, as good as ye old DVD disc is with it's Dolby surround soundtrack, which I nearly forgot to mention, it's bloody brilliant, enough said get this classic if your a true fan of horror.10/10  


Agree with every word of this, your love of this masterpiece positively spilling onto the page, the bit that really wowed me as a kid was the walk through the differently coloured rooms. A shame that after the Poe films he didn't maintain the really high standard of direction - I wish he would have gone further down the experimental style of this movie - and actually concentrated more and more on just producing.

_____________________________

check out more of my reviews on http://horrorcultfilms.co.uk/

(in reply to evil bill)
Post #: 14754
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 24/1/2013 6:20:47 PM   
Dr Lenera

 

Posts: 3997
Joined: 19/10/2005

quote:

ORIGINAL: paul.mccluskey

Arrow have announced new releases on Dual Format Blu-ray and DVD.

First up is George A. Romero's Knightriders, which will be available on 22nd April. Extras include:

- High Definition Blu-ray (1080p) and Standard Definition DVD presentation
- Optional English SDH subtitles for the deaf and hard of hearing
- Audio commentary with George Romero, Tom Savini, John Amplas and Christine Romero
- The Genesis of a Legend – Star Ed Harris remembers his first leading role
- A Date with Destiny – Co-star Tom Savini reflects on Knightriders
- Medieval Maiden – An interview with actress Patricia Tallman
- Theatrical Trailer
- TV Spots
- Reversible sleeve featuring original and newly commissioned artwork by Nat Marsh
- Collector’s booklet featuring new writing on the film by author and critic Brad Stevens, an archival interview with Romero and a new interview with composer Donald Rubinstein, illustrated with original archive stills and posters



Next is Motel Hell, due on 13th May. Special features are:

- High Definition Blu-ray (1080p) and Standard Definition DVD presentation of the film
- Optional English SDH subtitles for the deaf and hard of hearing
- Audio commentary with director Kevin Connor moderated by Calum Waddell
- Another Head on the Chopping Block: Interview with star Paul Linke
- From Glamour to Gore: Interview with co-star, and former Playboy Playmate, Rosanne Katon
- Ida, Be Thy Name: A look back at Motel Hell’s frightful female protagonist Ida Smith – and the secrets of creating a convincing slasher siren, with Scream Queens Elissa Dowling and Chantelle Albers, genre commentator Staci Layne Wilson and critic Shelagh Rowan-Legg
- Back to the Backwoods: Director Dave Parker (The Hills Run Red) speaks about the importance of Motel Hell
- Original Trailer
- Reversible sleeve featuring original and newly commissioned artwork by Jeff Zornow
- Collector’s booklet featuring new writing on the film by Kim Newman, illustrated with original archive stills and posters



Brian De Palma's psycho-thriller, Blow Out, will be available as both a limited edition steelbook and standard edition on 27th May. Special features at the time of going to press are:

- New, restored digital transfer, supervised and approved by director Brian De Palma
- Original Dolby 2.0 DTS-HD Master Audio
- Optional English SDH subtitles for the deaf and hard of hearing
- Black and White in Colour: An Interview with cinematographer Vilmos Zsigmond
- Rag Doll Memories: Nancy Allen on Blow Out
- Return to Philadelphia: An interview with Producer George Litto
- A gallery of on-set photos by photographer Louis Goldman
- Original Theatrical Trailer
- Collector’s booklet featuring new writing on the film by Michael Atkinson, a conversation between Quentin Tarantino and Brian De Palma and more to be confirmed!



Finally, Spider Baby, dubbed "the maddest story ever told", will be available on 24th June. Extras at the moment include:

- High Definition Blu-ray (1080p) and Standard Definition DVD presentation of the main feature, available in the UK for the first time
- High Definition transfer of the feature approved by director Jack Hill
- Isolated Music and Effects track
- English SDH subtitles for deaf and hearing impaired
- Audio commentary featuring Jack Hill and star Sid Haig
- The Hatching of Spider Baby – Interviews with Jack Hill, Sid Haig, star Mary Mitchel, fan Joe Dante and more on the making of the film
- Spider Stravinsky: The Cinema Sounds of Ronald Stein – The composer of ‘The Terror’ and ‘Attack of the 50 Foot Woman’ among others is remembered by Harlene Stein, Jack Hill, American Cinematheque’s Chris D. and others
- The Merrye House Revisited – Jack Hill revisits the original house that was used as the main location in the film
- Alternate opening title sequence
- Extended scene
- Gallery of behind-the-scenes images
- The Host (1960) – Jack Hill’s early short film featuring Sid Haig in his first starring role [30 mins]
- Reversible sleeve featuring original and newly commissioned artwork by Graham Humpreys
- Collector’s booklet featuring new writing on the film by artist and writer Stephen R. Bissette, and more to be confirmed!




Three cult classics there, love all three of them!

_____________________________

check out more of my reviews on http://horrorcultfilms.co.uk/

(in reply to paul.mccluskey)
Post #: 14755
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 24/1/2013 6:24:07 PM   
Dr Lenera

 

Posts: 3997
Joined: 19/10/2005

Mary Reilly, who was abused by her father as a child, is a lonely servant in the home of Dr. Henry Jekyll, devoted to her position and her master. Slowly, a gradual friendship between Mary and the doctor begins as well as a growing attraction. However, the household is thrown into turmoil when the master announces he will be getting an assistant named Mr Hyde. The staff speculate on his employment, as he is never fully seen and remains a mystery. Mary delivers a letter to a brothel at Jekyll’s behest and is shown not only a room covered in blood where Hyde has been but a blood stained handkerchief belonging to Jekyll, though when she eventually meets Hyde, he’s rather charming….



It’s a notion that has both its good and bad points, a version of Robert Louis Stevenson’s much adapted Dr Jekyll And Mr Hyde that takes place from the point of view of a maid who lives and works in the house. In a way it’s closer to the novel, which presented itself as a mystery until the final third and didn’t have Jekyll as its main protagonist until then, and surely it’s easier to be scared for a timid housemaid than a foolish doctor who brings his troubles on himself. Unfortunately, this also means that most of the good stuff happens off screen, and that the supposed mystery isn’t too thrilling because we already know what is going on. Mary Reilly is a rather interesting movie which in the end fails to have the courage of its convictions but is worth a look for fans of old-fashioned horror of the Gothic kind, and certainly shows its director Stephen Frears [The Queen, The Grifters], not a filmmaker I usually find of much interest, to be rather good at this type of story.

Valarie Martin’s novel Mary Reilly was published in 1990 but filming rights to it had already been acquired by Warner Bros, who then sold them to TriStar. Originally Roman Polanski was intended to direct with Jack Nicholson and Emmanuelle Seigner starring, but eventually it was Tim Burton who signed on, with Winona Wyder as Mary. Angry at the studio holding up release of his Ed Wood, Burton walked, to be replaced by Frears. The production reunited him with much of his Dangerous Liasons team including scriptwriter Christopher Hampton, stars John Malkovich and Glenn Close and much of the production crew. Supposedly the ending was rewritten twenty five times, which must be some kind of record, and it was reshot three times after production had finished, though the ending which made it into the film is little more than a more dramatic version of the rather anti-climactic finale of the book. Critics tended not to like the film much and audiences ignored it. Though it sounds like the kind of film I would rush to see, I never got round to it till the other day, and, actually, I wish I’d seen it sooner.

Now I must say right away there is one hurdle right away to get past and that is the performances, or rather the accents, of the two stars. Julia Roberts is to me an actress of quite remarkable mediocrity, but I do think she fares better when she isn’t trying to be funny or sexy. She is really quite convincing as the meek servant with strong feelings that are just bursting to come out, except for her bloody accent, which is supposed to be Irish but does sound like it some of the time but also lapses into English and American very frequently. Coupled with this, John Malkovich is totally and utterly American, and though the dual role sounds like something he would be great at, I found his Jekyll too strange and not distinct enough from his Hyde for my liking, but then this version makes the brave decision to avoid painting them simplistically in black and white. It’s also interesting to see to see Jekyll as an tired older man who gets young and is rejuvenated when he becomes Hyde, much like Hammer’s odd, intriguing if very flawed [much like this movie] The Two Faces Of Dr Jekyll.

This film is a Gothic freak’s paradise in terms of its look and settings, which are reminiscent of Universal’s horror classics. Streets are perpetually shrouded by a thick fog. Jekyll’s laboratory is only reachable by a bizarre walkway suspended by chains. His forbidding bedroom looks like something Suspiria’s Mother of Sighs would sleep in. A lecture hall, often photographed from high, resembles the descending circles of hell. Production designer does a wonderful job in offering us a Victorian world which is as grim as can be, a nightmarish vision filled with grime, blood and misguided science gone wrong which seemed to me very realistic. It’s as striking a portrayal of the Industrial Age as The Elephant Man. A great majority of the film is taken up with Mary moving around this gloomy world on her own, and even I got tired of constantly seeing her going up and down stairs, but it’s all quite compelling as long as you don’t expect lots of action and violence, though blood is certainly present, most notably in a scene in a brothel room which seems to deliberately evoke Jack The Ripper, and elsewhere there’s some briefly-glimpsed medical gore. We only see one transformation, and even that only partially, though it has a great and disturbing idea, that one man can be seen growing out of the other as he changes. The effect is poor and the whole scene looks unfinished, but the concept is striking.

In a way it’s the film’s constant sense of holding back that is its biggest downfall. Mary is attracted to Jekyll and Hyde, and both men want her, Hyde partially because Mary seems willing to forgive her cruel father who [rather grim flashback scenes here] beat her, locked her up and sent in rats to scurry all over her [and worse is hinted at too] and therefore thinks she has a slight attraction to evil. Mary’s a damaged soul who seems to find solace in the strange world she finds herself, a world which gives her life some focus. The psychological elements are plain to see and the movie does begin to develop them, but then seems to chicken out. Wouldn’t it, for instance, have been great to have a sex scene where in the middle of which one guy turns into the other? I guess it was felt that going too far with this stuff would weaken out the Jane Eyre-type Gothic romantic elements of the piece.

George Fenton’s score rarely seems absent, often having a sole violin movingly evoke Mary’s emotions, in a film which overall isn’t quite as touching as it tries to be. The script, which could have really done with being polished by another writer, seems to cleverly parallel the original novel at times, to the point where it probably helps if you have read it, but later inconsistently changes events in it. There is an undeniable awkwardness in Mary Reilly, which remains a rather compromised movie, but it has a lot of good qualities, and, though its poor reception has probably put paid to this, I’d like to see Frears dabble in this sort of thing again, because he’s rather good at it, to the point where, though it’s a shame Burton or Polanski didn’t end up making Mary Reilly, I’m not convinced it would have been that much better. Anyway, isn’t it about time we had a new version of Dr Jekyll And Mr Hyde on the screen?

Rating: 7/10

_____________________________

check out more of my reviews on http://horrorcultfilms.co.uk/

(in reply to Dr Lenera)
Post #: 14756
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 24/1/2013 8:42:13 PM   
evil bill


Posts: 6730
Joined: 19/7/2006
From: mordor/ uk
quote:

ORIGINAL: paul.mccluskey

Arrow have announced new releases on Dual Format Blu-ray and DVD.

First up is George A. Romero's Knightriders, which will be available on 22nd April.



Next is Motel Hell, due on 13th May.



Brian De Palma's psycho-thriller, Blow Out, will be available as both a limited edition steelbook and standard edition on 27th May.



Finally, Spider Baby, dubbed "the maddest story ever told", will be available on 24th June.


Cult Classics there, but Blow Out 1981 is the one for me as much as I love the others, as I've decided it's time to get my favourite Brian De Palma films on Blu-Ray, and that means from Sisters to this little gem.
 
BLOW OUT (1981)


Former police technician Jack Terri (John Travolta) makes his living doing sound for slasher flicks. While recording new outdoor effects one night, Jack witnesses a couple's car careen off a bridge into a river, but he can save only the female occupant, Sally (Nancy Allen). Jack begins to suspect something when he learns that her dead companion was a Presidential hopeful. Re-playing his tape over and over, Jack thinks that he hears a gun shot before the crash-causing tire blow-out. When sleazy photographer Manny Karp (Dennis Franz) comes forward with photos of the accident, Jack discovers the real reason that the naïve Sally was in the car -- and also a way to prove his auditory suspicions through motion pictures. Even with all his surveillance talent, however, Jack cannot see (or hear) how dangerous the big picture really is until it's too late.

Brian De Palma's Blow Out is in fact a homage to Michelangelo Antonioni's classic art movie Blow-Up (1966), though of course with his own unique style, which he had developed from Sisters onward. With split screen, sudden zooming, lots of visual trickery and a splash of slasher buried in this thrillers story. Though this is no horror film like his last few, for here he finally deserves the modern Hitchcock title he had been given, as he blends suspense and political paranoia, in a classic thriller where he turned his interests to technology and voyeurism. Of course there's always been a bit of voyeurism in his early films, but here he wears it proudly on his sleeve, but it also his most politically loaded film, made in the Reagan era. It's a conspiracy movie that more than suggests that American politics are still rotten, even seven years after Watergate, it also reminds those that can remember of Edward Kennedys near death in a car that went off a bridge into the water, just like in the opening of this film.



There are also some great performances, particularly John Travolta's convincing bid to be taken seriously after years of being dismissed as the kid from Grease, Saturday Night Fever etc. This was his first true adult performance, and to my surprise on first viewing he was excellent, so it's no wonder Quentin Tarantino loved this film and wanted John for Pulp Fiction, which as we know shot him into the super league of acting.  But back to John Travolta's performance as the sound effect man who stumbles in to a conspiracy to eliminate the witnesses to an accident, is his most under rated role, and it's sad that some folk only see him as an action man now, for it is here that he shines. And that goes for Nancy Allen as Sally, the young prostitute at the centre of the story too, for here we git the best, far better than her role in Dressed To Kill, for she shows more emotion here, and you truly feel for her plight, as the powers that be close in for the kill. Being married to the director might have helped her land the part, but she is in her best role ever so who cares, if some felt a better actress could have added more to the role, for in truth not many want to be cast as a prostitute. Then John Lighgow is perfectly cast as the creepy Burke, the evil hit man/psycho, who will stop at noting to get the job done, and i'm glad De Palma was that impressed he had him as star of Raising Cain where he real talent was on full throttle. Add to this already great line up Dennis Franz,who has the pivotal part of Karp, the man who was able to photograph the whole incident, but also now in danger of being removed by the psycho on the rampage.

Palma's downbeat film did not go over well with 1981 summer audiences, and was not a success, as far as money goes, but this film is clearly one of De Palma's best efforts, right up there with Scarface and The Untouchables. It is a touching, thrilling, great visuals that play with the mind and great central performances, and lets not forget the grandiose Pino Donaggio score, one of his finest.Plus an ending that will rock your mind, and where it's political undertones are fully understood at the films end, which is something not seen a lot these days, as sadly the suits wont allow the same freedom directors had back in the true golden years of cinema. This really is a classic, and should be shown in film-making classes, film appreciation classes, and fans of real cinema,for Blow Out harks back to 1970s political thrillers like The Parallax View (1974), using cinematic fireworks to tell an unsettling story about one man's struggle against unstoppable corruption .Also this is far better in every way to Blow Up, and never let's itself done with a happy Hollywood ending, that you know is just a cop out for the popcorn muitli plex film goers of  of today, no this leaves you gutted and also angry that it has hit the truth about the world we live in.8/10


< Message edited by evil bill -- 24/1/2013 8:53:56 PM >


_____________________________

"You listen to me now,i will find you and i will kill you!"

(in reply to paul.mccluskey)
Post #: 14757
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 24/1/2013 8:49:51 PM   
evil bill


Posts: 6730
Joined: 19/7/2006
From: mordor/ uk
quote:

ORIGINAL: Dr Lenera


quote:

ORIGINAL: evil bill


CORMAN/POE the AIP years.


This is a Corman/Poe masterpiece, a superb horror film that has not aged, as it looks as good as it ever did, in fact I want/need a Blu-ray of this one, as good as ye old DVD disc is with it's Dolby surround soundtrack, which I nearly forgot to mention, it's bloody brilliant, enough said get this classic if your a true fan of horror.10/10  


Agree with every word of this, your love of this masterpiece positively spilling onto the page, the bit that really wowed me as a kid was the walk through the differently coloured rooms. A shame that after the Poe films he didn't maintain the really high standard of direction - I wish he would have gone further down the experimental style of this movie - and actually concentrated more and more on just producing.

I find it so sad Corman seemed to just go back to making low budget B movies, with out any of the style he had developed on his Poe journey, it's such a waste.
quote:


 
George Fenton’s score rarely seems absent, often having a sole violin movingly evoke Mary’s emotions, in a film which overall isn’t quite as touching as it tries to be. The script, which could have really done with being polished by another writer, seems to cleverly parallel the original novel at times, to the point where it probably helps if you have read it, but later inconsistently changes events in it. There is an undeniable awkwardness in Mary Reilly, which remains a rather compromised movie, but it has a lot of good qualities, and, though its poor reception has probably put paid to this, I’d like to see Frears dabble in this sort of thing again, because he’s rather good at it, to the point where, though it’s a shame Burton or Polanski didn’t end up making Mary Reilly, I’m not convinced it would have been that much better. Anyway, isn’t it about time we had a new version of Dr Jekyll And Mr Hyde on the screen?

Rating: 7/10

Yes it's about time and who better to direct than George Fenton, for I too fell in love with this little Gothic gem of a film, that I saw so many years ago on rental DVD, and i'm glad you reminded me of a film i'd sadly forgotten.

_____________________________

"You listen to me now,i will find you and i will kill you!"

(in reply to Dr Lenera)
Post #: 14758
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 26/1/2013 5:39:29 PM   
dannyfletch


Posts: 648
Joined: 25/5/2008
From: Bromley
Just watched an American low budget independent flick called THE DAY. Don't know if anyone on here has seen it but it's definitely worth a watch. It's not amazing and has borrowed from numerous Mad Max and Night of the Living Dead style films but it is quite a dark and violently entertaining watch. It's basically set after some sort of apocalypse which we never find out about, and follows a small band of survivors as they take refuge in an abandoned house and end up being attacked by the local cannibals.
The film has a slow start and takes a bit too long to get going. Some of the performances are a bit over dramatic and there could've been a bit more meat on the bones. That said, I didn't really have any high expectations going into it.
The Last Exorcism star Ashley Bell plays the female lead and puts in quite a convincing turn as an experienced killer with a few moves up her sleeve. She shows great promise here and will hopefully go on to make more films which will give her more opportunity to kick ass as she's infinitely more impressive and convincing than the likes of Keira Knightley.
All in all if you like your survival horror movies and are not expecting anything too spectacular than The Day happily passes the time and entertains. 6/10 would be my rating

< Message edited by dannyfletch -- 27/1/2013 9:04:13 PM >

(in reply to evil bill)
Post #: 14759
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 26/1/2013 6:11:15 PM   
paul.mccluskey


Posts: 5165
Joined: 15/4/2007
From: Port Glasgow, Scotland, UK
I've watched a few films over the last couple of days. Firstly, I checked out the notorious video nasty, Don't Go in the House. Apart from one fairly disturbing sequence, it's a standard horror flick, but it's done really well. Also seen the uncut version of Jess Franco's The Bloody Judge. A Witchfinder General imitation, however, it is a brilliant hybrid of historical fact and horror, and Christopher Lee delivers an excellent performance.

Last night's movie was Devil, produced by M. Night Shyamalan. Intriguing, tense and claustrophobic, but I guessed the twist early on. That's not to say i didn't like it, I was gripped throughout actually, it was a fascinating idea.

Finally, I'm just back from Django Unchained. Quentin Tarantino has done it again, the film is a stunning piece of work, smartly directed with an awesome soundtrack and terrific performances, particularly from Christoph Waltz, who steals the show. It's Tarantino's best film since Kill Bill, glad to see it has been nominated for a few Oscars.

(in reply to dannyfletch)
Post #: 14760
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