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RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 14/11/2012 7:44:57 PM   
evil bill


Posts: 6730
Joined: 19/7/2006
From: mordor/ uk
quote:

ORIGINAL: Mister Coe

Good call, Dr Lenera, I really like MISSION TO MARS. It's not perfect but there's some damn good stuff there, not least the scene where one of the headlining actors exits the film halfway through. Deffo not deserving of the terrible reviews it got.

And Morricones score is excellent.

Welcome to the thread.
Mission To Mars was for me one of the better Sci/Fi films of 2000,and head above shoulders of Red Planet of the same year with Val Kilmer.Better directed and acted,and a great score from the master of film scores,though the best Sci Fi of that year was for me Pitch Black 2002;About a group of marooned space travelers who struggle for survival on a seemingly lifeless sun-scorched world.The casting is excellent with Radha Mitchell who is perfect for Fry. Cole Hauser brings the right amount of cruelness and sense of responsibility for Johns. But the most impressive work is done by Vin Diesel. He does great job as Riddick,he is quite creepy, definitely very dangerous and also deep character, just as he is supposed to be.Plus great script and effects add icing to the cake.
quote:


 
Typically for De Palma, Mission To Mars echoes many other films while still being entirely its own movie. The Abyss and 2001: A Space Odyssey are two which especially came to mind when I last viewed the film. Now an especially criticised aspect of the picture is Morricone’s score, perhaps because it’s so different to the typical ‘sound’ of a film of this kind, but to me that just sums up the narrow-mindedness of some critics. The composer seems to emphasise the wonder and beauty of space and other worlds with some gorgeous pieces, while often using atypical instruments such as the electric guitar and the organ. His music for the final scenes is truly beautiful and uplifting. Maybe it’s a little corny, but some corn is good for you once in a while. There is a lot about this movie that doesn’t really work, but there are some very good things in it, it had ambition to spare, and I’m not sure I would want it any other way.

Rating: 7/10



   As i said i do like this film and found it strange the way Disney seemed to wreak there own film,which for me was one of the better Sci/Fi films of that year.It would have been interesting to see if there was a chance of this like Star Wars, getting a revamp by Brain,IE adding in the effects that Disney did not want to pay for??
quote:


 
Ghosts of Mars is quite a gory film though the decapitations etc. are mostly of the blink-and-you’ll-miss-them type. Overall it doesn’t exhibit much imagination in its look except for one scene in a room full of dead bodies which is lit with Mario Bava-style hues. It shows laziness all-round. At the beginning, a point is made of stating that the film takes place in a matriarchal society, but it has no bearing on the rest of the film, a good summing-up of the attitude that makes up the whole film. And yet a bit of me wonders if this is actually a not-exactly misunderstood but maybe the most purely personal picture Carpenter ever made, and how can you not like a film which finishes with the lines:

Let’s go kick some ass

[reply] It’s what we do best

Rating: 4.5/10


This was to me a re boot/mix of Assault On Precinct 13,Escape From New York and Carpenter’s Vampires, and way it was such a mess.Carpenter just was getting lazy but it was no where near as bad as Escape From LA,which for me was the most awful films ever made by a great director.I still have Ghosts in my collection and do watch it from time to time,it has those Carpenter touchs that i love,the way the camera moves,the score,and a few nasty scares,that strangly still work.So for me your scores for both films are spot on,though i don't like .5 so it would be 4/10 for Ghosts Of Mars.

< Message edited by evil bill -- 14/11/2012 8:11:47 PM >


_____________________________

"You listen to me now,i will find you and i will kill you!"

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Post #: 14521
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 14/11/2012 7:52:14 PM   
evil bill


Posts: 6730
Joined: 19/7/2006
From: mordor/ uk
quote:

ORIGINAL: losthighway

I'm still around just been silly busy... most recent watch was ROOM 237. A documentary regarding various theories/hidden meanings within The Shining. As the film is one of my favourite films ever I was intrigued to see it. Sadly a good 70% of it is utter bullshite but there's three theories which actually make some sense and one in particular is downright creepy (if indeed it was Kubrick's intention!?)... All i'll say is forwards and backwards. If you've not had chance to see it, it hits DVD in Feb 2013. Worth a watch at least once. Overall: 3/5

Sounds like a decent documentary,did you watch it on Sky or download it,as it seems a shame to wait till Feb to see it,for as you know this is one of my Favorite Kubrick films.Also always ends up in my top ten Horror films of all time,and still causes a few discussions with the mates on what was it realy about,i mean that ending turned the whole thing on it's head.

_____________________________

"You listen to me now,i will find you and i will kill you!"

(in reply to losthighway)
Post #: 14522
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 14/11/2012 9:45:46 PM   
evil bill


Posts: 6730
Joined: 19/7/2006
From: mordor/ uk
CORMAN/POE the AIP years. 
The third film was originally produced for another studio, but AIP acquired the rights to it,and it's the only one without Price in the film.Instead we have Ray Milland,who's performance conveys the requisite amount of hand-wringing torment,but fails to capture the commanding presence of Vincent Price,and that manic intensity that Price brought to the other Poe films.Once again Corman produces,directs and helps do some of the writing duties,but unlike the first two the Screenplay is by Charles Beaumount and Ray Russell,though the rest of the team are on board for this one.
Premature Burial (1962)

Guy Carrell (Ray Milland) is so traumatized by the death of his father,who he believes was entombed alive after suffering a cataleptic attack,becomes convinced that he will meet a similar demise. Guy's mounting dementia rapidly undermines his recent marriage to the lovely Emily (Hazel Court), particularly after he begins the construction of a specially designed crypt rigged with numerous escape devices. Encouraged by Emily to face his fears, Guy decides to view his father's remains, to prove once and for all whether he died peacefully. When the crypt is opened, however, what he finds there is so horrifying that he succumbs to a cataleptic episode himself, which doctors misdiagnose as a fatal heart attack.

Corman's excellent direction, employing a rich palette of colors and awesome widescreen compositions,thunderstorms, fog-enshrouded cemeteries, eerie vaults all entirely shot on the sound stage.Well he got the same team he used on the first two,and they can do no wrong,with great stand out moments like,the shadow passing phantom like over the sleeping Milland,and the sudden shock moments when the sinister gravediggers Sweeny and Moe appear.Also the most creepy moment in the film has to be the blue tinted dream sequence in which Milland hallucinates about the fate he fears.This will make you not want to get buried,in fact you might consider the building a tomb equipped with numerous safety-valve escape mechanisms like in this film,which like the first two plays on our fear of Death.Art director Danial Haller once again shows you don't need a large budget to create fear,by creating a wonderful garden of gnarled trees and shrubs wreathed with dry ice,lots of dried ice.All is quite masterfully shot,and framed by  Crosby with great use of lighting,with once again that dreamlike feel that so works in this type of Gothic horror,also an excellent score by Ronald Stein adds to this film big time.

The bad news is it's let down by a weak script that bears too many similarities to its predecessors, House Of Usher and Pendulum,and without the writing talents of Matterson just falls flat.Ray Milland though carries off his role with the right amount of wounded vulnerability,that just about saves the film from the grave it nearly falls into.But i felt he just didn't have that power that Price was able to bring to these sort of roles,though don't get me wrong in the right film he is awesome,as a matter of fact,his subsequent role for Corman, that of Dr. James Xavier in The Man With The X-Ray Eyes (1963),was his best horror role.But when he becomes avenger not victim he just looks to young and immature to be a manic killer,that the story portrays.Hazel Court was the wrong choice to play the supportive wife,she's too much the sexy vixen to ever pass off as the object of sympathy that this story demands,and yet i liked her in many other roles.

Milland for me is the best actor in the film,the rest to be honest are average to bloody wooden,and even a great actor without a decent supporting cast,would struggle.Saying that this is a disturbing even shocking movie,and is highly enjoyable,if that's the right word,as it is the most grim,and also feels somewhat removed from the entire series.It also drags along even with it's short running time,though it jumps up a gear near the end with the whole murder-conspiracy twist,with murder and mayhem on full flow,and is far better than so many of these type of films,like Obsession by Brian de Palma.But yet compared to the rest this is the weaker one in the Corman/Poe installments,so there has to be one i'm not going to score to highly.6/10



_____________________________

"You listen to me now,i will find you and i will kill you!"

(in reply to DAVID GILLESPIE)
Post #: 14523
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 14/11/2012 9:59:00 PM   
Dr Lenera

 

Posts: 3999
Joined: 19/10/2005
I agree, one of the weaker Corman/Poe's, looks great of course and is effectively morbid and depressing, but is rather lacking generally. Think you missed out Pit And The Pendulum though?!

And I love De Palma's Obsession

< Message edited by Dr Lenera -- 15/11/2012 7:38:46 AM >


_____________________________

check out more of my reviews on http://horrorcultfilms.co.uk/

(in reply to evil bill)
Post #: 14524
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 15/11/2012 7:41:11 AM   
Dr Lenera

 

Posts: 3999
Joined: 19/10/2005

quote:

ORIGINAL: losthighway

I'm still around just been silly busy... most recent watch was ROOM 237. A documentary regarding various theories/hidden meanings within The Shining. As the film is one of my favourite films ever I was intrigued to see it. Sadly a good 70% of it is utter bullshite but there's three theories which actually make some sense and one in particular is downright creepy (if indeed it was Kubrick's intention!?)... All i'll say is forwards and backwards. If you've not had chance to see it, it hits DVD in Feb 2013. Worth a watch at least once. Overall: 3/5


Sounds about right for this, interesting but with lots of nonsense?

_____________________________

check out more of my reviews on http://horrorcultfilms.co.uk/

(in reply to losthighway)
Post #: 14525
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 15/11/2012 7:42:46 AM   
Dr Lenera

 

Posts: 3999
Joined: 19/10/2005

quote:

ORIGINAL: Mister Coe

Good call, Dr Lenera, I really like MISSION TO MARS. It's not perfect but there's some damn good stuff there, not least the scene where one of the headlining actors exits the film halfway through. Deffo not deserving of the terrible reviews it got.

And Morricones score is excellent.


Thanks, and good to know Bill and I are not the only ones who like it!

_____________________________

check out more of my reviews on http://horrorcultfilms.co.uk/

(in reply to Mister Coe)
Post #: 14526
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 15/11/2012 8:31:21 AM   
losthighway


Posts: 3248
Joined: 25/1/2006
From: Manchesterford
The good Dr and Bill...

I saw ROOM 237 at the cinema. It is actually doing a limited run around the UK so check out your local cinema listings. Admittedly we only had two screenings at my local arthouse cinema so it really is a catch it whilst you can affair. Oddly enough I haven't been to see the new print of the US cut of The Shining at the cinema. I just couldn't justify cos i've had it on SE R1 DVD for about 3-4 years now. If they release it in the UK on BR though i'll definitely be buying it.

And Dr... it has some really daft theories but these are just funny. The film is split into 9 parts with seriously die-hard fans who have WAY WAY WAY too much time on their hands to study the film talking about their various theories. Tbh I wouldn't be surprised if one or two are actually on the autism spectrum due to the level of detail they go into.

Oh and whilst I remember... Minotaur! Interesting! Watch it!

_____________________________

The secret to becoming a star is knowing how to behave like one.

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Post #: 14527
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 15/11/2012 9:56:05 AM   
Nexus Wookie


Posts: 2326
Joined: 24/9/2011
From: the Godcity
quote:

ORIGINAL: Dr Lenera

GUILTY PLEASURE MARS DOUBLE BILL


In 2020, on the evening before the first manned mission to the planet Mars, astronauts Woody Blake and Jim McConnell say farewell to Luke Graham, who is the leader of the mission. Upon arrival, the team discover a crystalline formation within a mountain in the Cydonia region. Hearing a strange sound on their communications system, which they assume to be interference from their planetary rover, they are then attacked by a large whirlwind made of sand which kills them all except for Luke. After the vortex subsides, a large humanoid face is exposed. Luke manages to upload an emergency transmission and a second ship is hastily readied for a rescue mission, headed by Woody and Jim…..

While the second film on this double bill is unashamedly a B-movie and needs to really be treated as such, Mission To Mars is something else, a would-be Hollywood blockbuster with a big budget, major stars etc. It’s a glorious folly, a wonderfully strange and rather brave film that doesn’t really deliver what you might expect, but is very interesting and certainly attempts to be more intelligent than most other science-fiction films of the time. At times it’s somewhat poor, but on other occasions it’s quite magnificent and certainly isn’t a blot on director Brian De Palma’s CV, though it is often treated as such. It’s certainly better than the other Mars movie of 2000, the dull Red Planet, and even if you hate it, you have to admire its sheer cheek. It seems to blithely ignore commercial considerations, and its ambition cannot be faulted. In aiming for the stars, De Palma doesn’t quite reach them, but he fails with honour.

Mission To Mars was, believe it or not, inspired by a Disney theme park ride with the same name. It was originally planned as a medium budget film with Gore Verbinski, then not much of a name, at the helm, but Touchstone Pictures, sensing a hit, upgraded the budget and Verbinski, at the time not comfortable with such a big movie, left [though he would later make a certain three films about pirates based on another Disney ride], and De Palma took over. He seems to have instigated some script rewrites but when the film was almost completed, the studio, not really liking what they were seeing, cut the budget, meaning that the ending, which was intended to be an enormous spectacle, had to be cut down and rushed. The picture was something of a flop and received mostly poor reviews. De Palma was even nominated for a Golden Raspberry award, something I find very bizarre. Interestingly though it was a success in France, where the magazine cahiers du cinema named as the fourth best film of 2000. I’m not sure I would go that far, but it does prove once again how perceptive of cinema they are in France.

Mission To Mars begins with a long conversation between three astronauts, and I should say right away if you haven’t seen it, this film has an awful lot of chat and can be very slow at times. Is this automatically a flaw? I personally think the film could have done with a bit of tightening here and there but it looks great throughout and, though many disagree, the dialogue is also rather good in its comic book way. “Let’s light this candle” may sound corny, but it was actually said by Alan Shepard, the first American in space, just before lift-off. To me Mission To Mars looks and sounds very authentic, with even the scenes on Mars really looking like they were filmed on the red planet. The giant face that appears in the film was actually based on a photograph taken from one of the Viking missions in the 1970s, which revealed what appeared to be a face-like shape in the surface features. The special effects convince for the most part, and you can say all you want about the CG sandstorm that appears near the beginning [including the fact that it had not long been done better in The Mummy], but it wouldn’t automaticaly look any better now; in many ways CGI has not improved at all. in fact sometimes it’s got worse as more and more things are done digitally.

Said sandstorm scene, replete with a rather gruesome death for a ‘PG’ film, is the only thrill in the first third, and the film does drag for a while, but the performances are good [even if Gary Sinise wears some very odd eye makeup that makes him look like a drag queen] and De Palma’s usual cameraman Stephen H. Burum gives us some great camera moves which show us around the ship. Then a gas leak occurs, and for the next twenty minutes or so we are treated to a master class in sustained tension as things just get worse and worse. The special effects are superb, the editing is perfect and Ennio Morricone’s scoring, a simple synthesised beat with an organ that sometimes goes into full-blown orchestral emotion, perfectly backs up the action. This is De Palma working near his best, technically astounding, totally riveting and rather emotional. He also shows himself entirely comfortable in the world of special effects, never ignoring the human element and conveying a realistic sense of peril amongst all the spectacle.

It’s fair to say that after this the film never reaches those giddy heights again. There’s a considerable amount of suspense as the astronauts near the secret on Mars that will reveal everything, and a hugely entertaining performance from the underrated Don Cheadle to enjoy as Luke the survivor of the opening sequence, but the film refuses to give us the expected action climax. Then again, Mission To Mars often perversely refuses to show us what we might expect; for instance we don’t see any of the rockets taking off. Instead it gives us a potted evolution history and a possible explanation of our origins. The visuals alternate between being tacky and being rather cool, while the ideas are perhaps not as original as all that; Quatermass And The Pit offered up pretty much the same thing, and it seems that Prometheus, in turn, used the same basic concept. I love the ending anyway for its plain bizarreness and its ambition though I can’t stop wondering what the original conception would have been like.

Typically for De Palma, Mission To Mars echoes many other films while still being entirely its own movie. The Abyss and 2001: A Space Odyssey are two which especially came to mind when I last viewed the film. Now an especially criticised aspect of the picture is Morricone’s score, perhaps because it’s so different to the typical ‘sound’ of a film of this kind, but to me that just sums up the narrow-mindedness of some critics. The composer seems to emphasise the wonder and beauty of space and other worlds with some gorgeous pieces, while often using atypical instruments such as the electric guitar and the organ. His music for the final scenes is truly beautiful and uplifting. Maybe it’s a little corny, but some corn is good for you once in a while. There is a lot about this movie that doesn’t really work, but there are some very good things in it, it had ambition to spare, and I’m not sure I would want it any other way.

Rating: 7/10


Wow wow wow! No where will you find such an insightful review of a hugely underrated sci-fi gem like this film, than this thread! Thank you Dr Lenera for a balanced and revelatory review! I say revelatory because i didn't know some of the things that you have cited about Mission to Mars - like the fact it was originally based on a Disney theme park ride and it was well received in France. I find it a really intriguing film. Its quite unlike most of the other sci-fi pics of the time as you have said. The score by Morricone is really superb. Did you know i got my four year old boy (who's really into all things space) to watch it and he loved it! But then again he does have a wide ranging taste in films which i think he gets from his dad!

Once again thanks for an awesome review!


< Message edited by Nexus Wookie -- 15/11/2012 9:58:57 AM >


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Post #: 14528
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 15/11/2012 7:47:52 PM   
evil bill


Posts: 6730
Joined: 19/7/2006
From: mordor/ uk
quote:

ORIGINAL: Dr Lenera

I agree, one of the weaker Corman/Poe's, looks great of course and is effectively morbid and depressing, but is rather lacking generally. Think you missed out Pit And The Pendulum though?!

And I love De Palma's Obsession

I know your under pressure mate but old age may be creeping up on you too
Page 484 IE one back and even David read it last week.
But to save you flicking back here it is,and yes i am doing them by the year,so you know whats next???
quote:


quote:

ORIGINAL: DAVID GILLESPIE




quote:

ORIGINAL: evil bill

CORMAN/POE the AIP years.
The Fall Of The House Of Usher was released in June 1960,and its box office success took AIP's James H. Nicholson and Samuel Z. Arkoff by surprise. Corman admitted, "We anticipated that the movie would do well, but not half as well as it did." According to screenwritter Richard Matheson, "When the first film was a hit, they still didn't consider doing a Poe series. They just wanted another movie with a Poe title fixed to it".Of course this changed with this second film,which was an even bigger critical and box office hit,and convinced AIP and Corman to continue with more Poe stories for another six films, five of them starring Price.There influence on the Italian directors is so powerful,the way Corman and his team used widescreen and colour.This second film alone can be seen in Dario Argento's Deep Red ,and Mario Bava's The Whip And The Body,both in style and story.What film am i talking about,well;
The Pit and the Pendulum (1961)


Nicholas Medina (Vincent Price),is the son of a notorious Spanish Inquisition torturer,his wife Elizabeth (Barbara Steele) has died under mysterious circumstances, prompting Elizabeth's brother Francis (John Kerr) to arrive at the Medina castle to investigate. The tormented Medina believes that Elizabeth was buried alive, and is convinced that he can hear his wife's voice calling out to him. In truth, Elizabeth has faked her death, part of a plan concocted with her lover Dr. Leon (Anthony Carbone) to drive Medina mad. She succeeds in this goal (albeit to her own grief, as the film's very last shot reveals), pushing Medina over the brink. Convinced that he's his own father, Medina dons Inquisition robes, straps Francis to a table,and arranges for a huge steel-bladed pendulum to descend on his helpless victim.

The Pit & The Pendulum was also shot on the budget and schedule of a B film,and to make sure it all went smoothly the production's shoot was kept short with a comprehensive pre planning.Once again he used Floyd Crosby director of photography and Art Director Daniel Haller,so everyone knew exactly what to do, barring any last minute inspirations on the set.So when they moved into the studio it took just for fifteen days of shooting,which i can't imagine any modern horror being shot in such a short space of time.Plus still look awesome with eerily evocative color camera work and sumptuous art direction,all for just $300,000,though as usual the costs where kept down by using old discarded set's and stock footage.

For the climactic torture sequence they built the pendulum eighteen feet long and weighed over a ton, and was constructed with a realistic rubber cutting blade. The pendulum was rigged from the top of the sound stage thirty-five feet in the air and would later find its way into the 1966 spy spoof Dr. Goldfoot and the Bikini Machine, which also starred Vincent Price.The haunted castle was owned by American-International and is used to full advantage in Roger Corman's Pit & the Pendulum,though the climax in Richard Matheson's script bears little resemblance to the Edgar Allen Poe original story, though there are echoes throughout of Poe's The Premature Burial.It's the reoccurring theme of being buried alive,which is something that appears to have fascinated Edgar Allen Poe as it appears in a number of his stories.It fascinates me also to imagine the terror of being alone in an enclosed space with nobody or nothing to help you escape and that's what makes it so horrifying, and such a great springboard for a Gothic horror film.This is what truly great end Gothic horror films do,and this is Corman's Poe homage in a grandiose way,that only Corman and his team could do.

The cast this time is even better than the House Of Usher,with Vincent Price once again taking the lead role,making his powerful presence even more twisted,as he goes from melodrama to utter horror,some find this ham over-the-top melodrama but it suits Poe's adaptations,giving them that Shakespearean feel. John Kerr makes a terrific counterpart and his performance is very believable,as Englishman Francis Barnard,who on his trip to Spain he has received news of the death of his beloved sister Elizabeth (Barbara Steele).Barbara Steele unfortunately, doesn't get a lot of screen time and it's a shame because the aura of mystery round her suits perfectly the atmospheric horror of the film.Though a small role in this she did become a big star of horror in Mario Bava's Black Sunday,which also suited her ample talents.Luana Anders like Steele not only shows off her beauty,but also her talent for melodrama as Medina's sister Catherine,though for me she never out shines Steele.

Overall the film is near perfect and a great joy to watch,even though Richard Matheson script is not really a faithful adaptation,it is a cleverly written story that blends many different Poe stories into one.The characters are the film's soul and Matheson knows this as he forms the bonds and relationships between them which powers on the story and actors talents to there limit. The mystery of Elizabeth's death and Medina's castle is very well-handled and the unexpected climax is a classic horror moment that captures Poe's obsession with death,love,ancient buildings and Gothic settings.Corman's lavish Gothic set's once again give this an epic feel,and the unique use of color only add to the overall effect of the film.The last 20 minutes is horror film pure gold as Corman orchestrates flashback sequences in a blue red bloody tint,as he closes the camera's eye in on a character retelling a past occurrence.This is this film's flagship sequence the pendulum scene,where Corman took out every other frame to give the impression that the pendulum was swinging faster than it actually was. The way the pendulum swings across and gets lower every time depicts another horrible way to die,with the click click in the swing reminding us of a ticking clock and impending doom/death.Pit and the Pendulum is a masterpiece of low-budget film-making, a movie that looks even better than most of the big studios productions of even today even with all there CGI.10/10

Totally agree with you on this, a timeless classic. Certainly does not look low budget. Spot on review, mate.


Thanks mate glad to see your still floating around,and hope to get up the next couple of reviews soon,as i'm just about to watch??? now that would be telling.



_____________________________

"You listen to me now,i will find you and i will kill you!"

(in reply to Dr Lenera)
Post #: 14529
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 16/11/2012 9:01:24 AM   
Platter

 

Posts: 113
Joined: 14/8/2010


I wrote a novella called Barker Woo.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Barker-Woo-ebook/dp/B00A6OQOWS/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1353055169&sr=1-1

Like ninety-nine point nine percent of the world’s population I don’t have access to film industry contacts. What if I want to make a movie? Tough. It isn’t going to happen.

What I realised I could do was write a novella out of a movie idea in my mind. I don’t need contacts, money or even permission from anyone. I can just do it. So I did. It’s like having Warner Brothers in your back pocket willing to finance literally anything, no matter how big the budget.

The story was conceived from the ground up as prose. No compromises have been made in favour of any supposed movie version. There’s no point deferring to something that will never be.

I haven’t timed the novella but it should probably take two hours to read.

I’ve published it as a download on Amazon. The intention was to make it available for free. Unfortunately Amazon insists on a minimum price. So sadly it’s 77p to download.

Luckily I’ve set up a short term promotion on it. So it’s free to download until the 20th this month. You don’t need to have a Kindle as it can be read on your computer.

-----------------------------------------------------

Product description:

Enthusiasts of surrealist films by David Lynch (Eraserhead, Blue Velvet, Twin Peaks, Wild at Heart, Lost Highway and Mulholland Drive), Luis Buñuel (The Exterminating Angel, Diary of a Chambermaid, Belle de Jour and The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie) and to a lesser extent Kenneth Anger (Fireworks, Inauguration of the Pleasure Dome and Lucifer Rising) should find a lot to enjoy in this novella.

Dean and Claire Rusk are a happily married couple. They are members of an up and coming post-rock art band called Barker Woo. Preparations are underway for a short tour, and to start the writing and recording of a second album.

They return home from rehearsals to find a dark wooden box in their house. The title of a newly created song has been carved into the lid. They crack open the lid and peer inside. They see something disturbing.

They quickly realise that it’s not real. Instead it’s an intricate model. They wonder if it’s a practical joke or the work of a deranged fan. How did it get indoors? ‘We don’t have many fans, but the ones we do have are just a bit too interested in us.’ No one else beyond the band and a roadie could know about the new song, and they wouldn’t have enough time to create such an item.

They check the house to see if anything is missing. Everyone they talk to denies having anything to do with it.

The next morning Barker Woo embarks on the start of their short tour.

On the road they discover another sculpture. It seems someone might be sharing the same mental headspace as Claire.

“‘We were very interested in a sculpture of yours we saw. It fits something we’re doing as a band. We’re musicians.’
‘Yes. I know. That sculpture was made for you.’
‘Really?’
‘I hope it met with your approval?’
‘It was very spooky. Very unnerving. How did you know it would mean so much to me?’
‘I’m just a candle, here to set a mood. My only job is to prepare the both of you. It is important that you can appreciate the immensity of what is going to happen. The right frame of mind will be essential to your future work.’
‘That’s very vague,’ points out Claire.”

There will be blood by the end.

-----------------------------------------------------

If someone reads it and then tries to imagine a film version, they might point out that the music is going to be a big problem. More than likely any music created for the fictitious Barker Woo rock band will not be up to standard. The audience will laugh at how lame it is. My solution is simple. Have no music. At all. As soon as a member of Barker Woo starts playing kill the soundtrack, including ambient noise and sound effects. Only spoken dialogue can still be heard shouted over the racket. It’s an idea I had from the start so I don’t see it as a compromise.

_____________________________

My novel:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/This-Cuckoo-Island-ebook/dp/B00EIP4ZVS/ref=sr_1_4?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1377097535&sr=1-4

(in reply to evil bill)
Post #: 14530
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 17/11/2012 1:04:12 PM   
paul.mccluskey


Posts: 5165
Joined: 15/4/2007
From: Port Glasgow, Scotland, UK
Went to see Twilight: Breaking Dawn Part 2 last night. Like the other films, it's beautifully shot, but, like the previous movies, it's everything you would expect from this franchise. There is a scene at the end that had the whole audience gasping then laughing it was so out of the blue.

Anyway, now we can get back to watching proper vampire flicks !

(in reply to Platter)
Post #: 14531
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 17/11/2012 1:53:21 PM   
joig

 

Posts: 4
Joined: 17/11/2012
My vote would be for critters.

The person who thought of this line is a genious:

"You Are what they eat"

<iframe width="560" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/zBaJDQ21W0s?rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>


Always have a sweetspot for this movie, this nice eighties nostalgia.

_____________________________


My Little Link Collection

(in reply to paul.mccluskey)
Post #: 14532
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 17/11/2012 1:54:21 PM   
joig

 

Posts: 4
Joined: 17/11/2012
Oh ffs how do I get the youtube to work?

_____________________________


My Little Link Collection

(in reply to joig)
Post #: 14533
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 17/11/2012 3:07:59 PM   
evil bill


Posts: 6730
Joined: 19/7/2006
From: mordor/ uk
quote:

ORIGINAL: Nexus Wookie

quote:

ORIGINAL: Dr Lenera

GUILTY PLEASURE MARS DOUBLE BILL


Wow wow wow! No where will you find such an insightful review of a hugely underrated sci-fi gem like this film, than this thread! Thank you Dr Lenera for a balanced and revelatory review! I say revelatory because i didn't know some of the things that you have cited about Mission to Mars - like the fact it was originally based on a Disney theme park ride and it was well received in France. I find it a really intriguing film. Its quite unlike most of the other sci-fi pics of the time as you have said. The score by Morricone is really superb. Did you know i got my four year old boy (who's really into all things space) to watch it and he loved it! But then again he does have a wide ranging taste in films which i think he gets from his dad!

Once again thanks for an awesome review!


Toltally agree,in fact i've said it before and i'll say it again,the Dr should do a book on his favoritie films,cause i for one would buy it,he seems to be able to unearth facts that i've not seen in any other reviews around.And talking of books seems Platter has been a busy boy,i wish him all the best with his writing even if i find some of his reviews rubbish.

_____________________________

"You listen to me now,i will find you and i will kill you!"

(in reply to Nexus Wookie)
Post #: 14534
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 17/11/2012 3:10:14 PM   
evil bill


Posts: 6730
Joined: 19/7/2006
From: mordor/ uk
quote:

ORIGINAL: paul.mccluskey

Went to see Twilight: Breaking Dawn Part 2 last night. Like the other films, it's beautifully shot, but, like the previous movies, it's everything you would expect from this franchise. There is a scene at the end that had the whole audience gasping then laughing it was so out of the blue.

Anyway, now we can get back to watching proper vampire flicks !

Yeah we need some real Vampire flicks like The Hunger or Let The Right One In,but seems theres a lack of good Vampire storys around at the moment.

_____________________________

"You listen to me now,i will find you and i will kill you!"

(in reply to paul.mccluskey)
Post #: 14535
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 17/11/2012 3:12:59 PM   
evil bill


Posts: 6730
Joined: 19/7/2006
From: mordor/ uk
quote:

ORIGINAL: joig

My vote would be for critters.

The person who thought of this line is a genious:

"You Are what they eat"

<iframe width="560" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/zBaJDQ21W0s?rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>


Always have a sweetspot for this movie, this nice eighties nostalgia.

quote:


Oh ffs how do I get the youtube to work?

Glad to see i'm not the only one that has problems pasteing links
Welcome newbie

_____________________________

"You listen to me now,i will find you and i will kill you!"

(in reply to joig)
Post #: 14536
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 17/11/2012 11:27:48 PM   
Nexus Wookie


Posts: 2326
Joined: 24/9/2011
From: the Godcity

quote:

ORIGINAL: evil bill

quote:

ORIGINAL: Nexus Wookie

quote:

ORIGINAL: Dr Lenera

GUILTY PLEASURE MARS DOUBLE BILL


Wow wow wow! No where will you find such an insightful review of a hugely underrated sci-fi gem like this film, than this thread! Thank you Dr Lenera for a balanced and revelatory review! I say revelatory because i didn't know some of the things that you have cited about Mission to Mars - like the fact it was originally based on a Disney theme park ride and it was well received in France. I find it a really intriguing film. Its quite unlike most of the other sci-fi pics of the time as you have said. The score by Morricone is really superb. Did you know i got my four year old boy (who's really into all things space) to watch it and he loved it! But then again he does have a wide ranging taste in films which i think he gets from his dad!

Once again thanks for an awesome review!


Toltally agree,in fact i've said it before and i'll say it again,the Dr should do a book on his favoritie films,cause i for one would buy it,he seems to be able to unearth facts that i've not seen in any other reviews around.And talking of books seems Platter has been a busy boy,i wish him all the best with his writing even if i find some of his reviews rubbish.


Lol! Same here - good luck with your book Platter.

I also agree with you evil bill; i would jump at the chance to obtain a collection of the good Doctor's awesome reviews!

_____________________________

My blog: http://nexuswookie.wordpress.com/

(in reply to evil bill)
Post #: 14537
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 18/11/2012 6:20:28 PM   
Dr Lenera

 

Posts: 3999
Joined: 19/10/2005

quote:

ORIGINAL: evil bill

quote:

ORIGINAL: Dr Lenera

I agree, one of the weaker Corman/Poe's, looks great of course and is effectively morbid and depressing, but is rather lacking generally. Think you missed out Pit And The Pendulum though?!

And I love De Palma's Obsession

I know your under pressure mate but old age may be creeping up on you too
Page 484 IE one back and even David read it last week.
But to save you flicking back here it is,and yes i am doing them by the year,so you know whats next???
quote:


quote:

ORIGINAL: DAVID GILLESPIE




quote:

ORIGINAL: evil bill

CORMAN/POE the AIP years.
The Fall Of The House Of Usher was released in June 1960,and its box office success took AIP's James H. Nicholson and Samuel Z. Arkoff by surprise. Corman admitted, "We anticipated that the movie would do well, but not half as well as it did." According to screenwritter Richard Matheson, "When the first film was a hit, they still didn't consider doing a Poe series. They just wanted another movie with a Poe title fixed to it".Of course this changed with this second film,which was an even bigger critical and box office hit,and convinced AIP and Corman to continue with more Poe stories for another six films, five of them starring Price.There influence on the Italian directors is so powerful,the way Corman and his team used widescreen and colour.This second film alone can be seen in Dario Argento's Deep Red ,and Mario Bava's The Whip And The Body,both in style and story.What film am i talking about,well;
The Pit and the Pendulum (1961)


Nicholas Medina (Vincent Price),is the son of a notorious Spanish Inquisition torturer,his wife Elizabeth (Barbara Steele) has died under mysterious circumstances, prompting Elizabeth's brother Francis (John Kerr) to arrive at the Medina castle to investigate. The tormented Medina believes that Elizabeth was buried alive, and is convinced that he can hear his wife's voice calling out to him. In truth, Elizabeth has faked her death, part of a plan concocted with her lover Dr. Leon (Anthony Carbone) to drive Medina mad. She succeeds in this goal (albeit to her own grief, as the film's very last shot reveals), pushing Medina over the brink. Convinced that he's his own father, Medina dons Inquisition robes, straps Francis to a table,and arranges for a huge steel-bladed pendulum to descend on his helpless victim.

The Pit & The Pendulum was also shot on the budget and schedule of a B film,and to make sure it all went smoothly the production's shoot was kept short with a comprehensive pre planning.Once again he used Floyd Crosby director of photography and Art Director Daniel Haller,so everyone knew exactly what to do, barring any last minute inspirations on the set.So when they moved into the studio it took just for fifteen days of shooting,which i can't imagine any modern horror being shot in such a short space of time.Plus still look awesome with eerily evocative color camera work and sumptuous art direction,all for just $300,000,though as usual the costs where kept down by using old discarded set's and stock footage.

For the climactic torture sequence they built the pendulum eighteen feet long and weighed over a ton, and was constructed with a realistic rubber cutting blade. The pendulum was rigged from the top of the sound stage thirty-five feet in the air and would later find its way into the 1966 spy spoof Dr. Goldfoot and the Bikini Machine, which also starred Vincent Price.The haunted castle was owned by American-International and is used to full advantage in Roger Corman's Pit & the Pendulum,though the climax in Richard Matheson's script bears little resemblance to the Edgar Allen Poe original story, though there are echoes throughout of Poe's The Premature Burial.It's the reoccurring theme of being buried alive,which is something that appears to have fascinated Edgar Allen Poe as it appears in a number of his stories.It fascinates me also to imagine the terror of being alone in an enclosed space with nobody or nothing to help you escape and that's what makes it so horrifying, and such a great springboard for a Gothic horror film.This is what truly great end Gothic horror films do,and this is Corman's Poe homage in a grandiose way,that only Corman and his team could do.

The cast this time is even better than the House Of Usher,with Vincent Price once again taking the lead role,making his powerful presence even more twisted,as he goes from melodrama to utter horror,some find this ham over-the-top melodrama but it suits Poe's adaptations,giving them that Shakespearean feel. John Kerr makes a terrific counterpart and his performance is very believable,as Englishman Francis Barnard,who on his trip to Spain he has received news of the death of his beloved sister Elizabeth (Barbara Steele).Barbara Steele unfortunately, doesn't get a lot of screen time and it's a shame because the aura of mystery round her suits perfectly the atmospheric horror of the film.Though a small role in this she did become a big star of horror in Mario Bava's Black Sunday,which also suited her ample talents.Luana Anders like Steele not only shows off her beauty,but also her talent for melodrama as Medina's sister Catherine,though for me she never out shines Steele.

Overall the film is near perfect and a great joy to watch,even though Richard Matheson script is not really a faithful adaptation,it is a cleverly written story that blends many different Poe stories into one.The characters are the film's soul and Matheson knows this as he forms the bonds and relationships between them which powers on the story and actors talents to there limit. The mystery of Elizabeth's death and Medina's castle is very well-handled and the unexpected climax is a classic horror moment that captures Poe's obsession with death,love,ancient buildings and Gothic settings.Corman's lavish Gothic set's once again give this an epic feel,and the unique use of color only add to the overall effect of the film.The last 20 minutes is horror film pure gold as Corman orchestrates flashback sequences in a blue red bloody tint,as he closes the camera's eye in on a character retelling a past occurrence.This is this film's flagship sequence the pendulum scene,where Corman took out every other frame to give the impression that the pendulum was swinging faster than it actually was. The way the pendulum swings across and gets lower every time depicts another horrible way to die,with the click click in the swing reminding us of a ticking clock and impending doom/death.Pit and the Pendulum is a masterpiece of low-budget film-making, a movie that looks even better than most of the big studios productions of even today even with all there CGI.10/10

Totally agree with you on this, a timeless classic. Certainly does not look low budget. Spot on review, mate.


Thanks mate glad to see your still floating around,and hope to get up the next couple of reviews soon,as i'm just about to watch??? now that would be telling.




Sorry mate missed it, yeah must be old age, or effects of too much partying over the years, or something......anyway,another great review, this film is the first one of the series I saw, I think, and still one of the best-I remember getting real nervous during the pendulum scene as a lad...

_____________________________

check out more of my reviews on http://horrorcultfilms.co.uk/

(in reply to evil bill)
Post #: 14538
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 18/11/2012 6:22:08 PM   
Dr Lenera

 

Posts: 3999
Joined: 19/10/2005

quote:

ORIGINAL: Platter



I wrote a novella called Barker Woo.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Barker-Woo-ebook/dp/B00A6OQOWS/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1353055169&sr=1-1

Like ninety-nine point nine percent of the world’s population I don’t have access to film industry contacts. What if I want to make a movie? Tough. It isn’t going to happen.

What I realised I could do was write a novella out of a movie idea in my mind. I don’t need contacts, money or even permission from anyone. I can just do it. So I did. It’s like having Warner Brothers in your back pocket willing to finance literally anything, no matter how big the budget.

The story was conceived from the ground up as prose. No compromises have been made in favour of any supposed movie version. There’s no point deferring to something that will never be.

I haven’t timed the novella but it should probably take two hours to read.

I’ve published it as a download on Amazon. The intention was to make it available for free. Unfortunately Amazon insists on a minimum price. So sadly it’s 77p to download.

Luckily I’ve set up a short term promotion on it. So it’s free to download until the 20th this month. You don’t need to have a Kindle as it can be read on your computer.

-----------------------------------------------------

Product description:

Enthusiasts of surrealist films by David Lynch (Eraserhead, Blue Velvet, Twin Peaks, Wild at Heart, Lost Highway and Mulholland Drive), Luis Buñuel (The Exterminating Angel, Diary of a Chambermaid, Belle de Jour and The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie) and to a lesser extent Kenneth Anger (Fireworks, Inauguration of the Pleasure Dome and Lucifer Rising) should find a lot to enjoy in this novella.

Dean and Claire Rusk are a happily married couple. They are members of an up and coming post-rock art band called Barker Woo. Preparations are underway for a short tour, and to start the writing and recording of a second album.

They return home from rehearsals to find a dark wooden box in their house. The title of a newly created song has been carved into the lid. They crack open the lid and peer inside. They see something disturbing.

They quickly realise that it’s not real. Instead it’s an intricate model. They wonder if it’s a practical joke or the work of a deranged fan. How did it get indoors? ‘We don’t have many fans, but the ones we do have are just a bit too interested in us.’ No one else beyond the band and a roadie could know about the new song, and they wouldn’t have enough time to create such an item.

They check the house to see if anything is missing. Everyone they talk to denies having anything to do with it.

The next morning Barker Woo embarks on the start of their short tour.

On the road they discover another sculpture. It seems someone might be sharing the same mental headspace as Claire.

“‘We were very interested in a sculpture of yours we saw. It fits something we’re doing as a band. We’re musicians.’
‘Yes. I know. That sculpture was made for you.’
‘Really?’
‘I hope it met with your approval?’
‘It was very spooky. Very unnerving. How did you know it would mean so much to me?’
‘I’m just a candle, here to set a mood. My only job is to prepare the both of you. It is important that you can appreciate the immensity of what is going to happen. The right frame of mind will be essential to your future work.’
‘That’s very vague,’ points out Claire.”

There will be blood by the end.

-----------------------------------------------------

If someone reads it and then tries to imagine a film version, they might point out that the music is going to be a big problem. More than likely any music created for the fictitious Barker Woo rock band will not be up to standard. The audience will laugh at how lame it is. My solution is simple. Have no music. At all. As soon as a member of Barker Woo starts playing kill the soundtrack, including ambient noise and sound effects. Only spoken dialogue can still be heard shouted over the racket. It’s an idea I had from the start so I don’t see it as a compromise.


Looks most interesting, I will download and read when I have some time!

_____________________________

check out more of my reviews on http://horrorcultfilms.co.uk/

(in reply to Platter)
Post #: 14539
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 18/11/2012 6:26:01 PM   
Dr Lenera

 

Posts: 3999
Joined: 19/10/2005

quote:

ORIGINAL: Nexus Wookie

quote:

ORIGINAL: Dr Lenera

GUILTY PLEASURE MARS DOUBLE BILL


In 2020, on the evening before the first manned mission to the planet Mars, astronauts Woody Blake and Jim McConnell say farewell to Luke Graham, who is the leader of the mission. Upon arrival, the team discover a crystalline formation within a mountain in the Cydonia region. Hearing a strange sound on their communications system, which they assume to be interference from their planetary rover, they are then attacked by a large whirlwind made of sand which kills them all except for Luke. After the vortex subsides, a large humanoid face is exposed. Luke manages to upload an emergency transmission and a second ship is hastily readied for a rescue mission, headed by Woody and Jim…..

While the second film on this double bill is unashamedly a B-movie and needs to really be treated as such, Mission To Mars is something else, a would-be Hollywood blockbuster with a big budget, major stars etc. It’s a glorious folly, a wonderfully strange and rather brave film that doesn’t really deliver what you might expect, but is very interesting and certainly attempts to be more intelligent than most other science-fiction films of the time. At times it’s somewhat poor, but on other occasions it’s quite magnificent and certainly isn’t a blot on director Brian De Palma’s CV, though it is often treated as such. It’s certainly better than the other Mars movie of 2000, the dull Red Planet, and even if you hate it, you have to admire its sheer cheek. It seems to blithely ignore commercial considerations, and its ambition cannot be faulted. In aiming for the stars, De Palma doesn’t quite reach them, but he fails with honour.

Mission To Mars was, believe it or not, inspired by a Disney theme park ride with the same name. It was originally planned as a medium budget film with Gore Verbinski, then not much of a name, at the helm, but Touchstone Pictures, sensing a hit, upgraded the budget and Verbinski, at the time not comfortable with such a big movie, left [though he would later make a certain three films about pirates based on another Disney ride], and De Palma took over. He seems to have instigated some script rewrites but when the film was almost completed, the studio, not really liking what they were seeing, cut the budget, meaning that the ending, which was intended to be an enormous spectacle, had to be cut down and rushed. The picture was something of a flop and received mostly poor reviews. De Palma was even nominated for a Golden Raspberry award, something I find very bizarre. Interestingly though it was a success in France, where the magazine cahiers du cinema named as the fourth best film of 2000. I’m not sure I would go that far, but it does prove once again how perceptive of cinema they are in France.

Mission To Mars begins with a long conversation between three astronauts, and I should say right away if you haven’t seen it, this film has an awful lot of chat and can be very slow at times. Is this automatically a flaw? I personally think the film could have done with a bit of tightening here and there but it looks great throughout and, though many disagree, the dialogue is also rather good in its comic book way. “Let’s light this candle” may sound corny, but it was actually said by Alan Shepard, the first American in space, just before lift-off. To me Mission To Mars looks and sounds very authentic, with even the scenes on Mars really looking like they were filmed on the red planet. The giant face that appears in the film was actually based on a photograph taken from one of the Viking missions in the 1970s, which revealed what appeared to be a face-like shape in the surface features. The special effects convince for the most part, and you can say all you want about the CG sandstorm that appears near the beginning [including the fact that it had not long been done better in The Mummy], but it wouldn’t automaticaly look any better now; in many ways CGI has not improved at all. in fact sometimes it’s got worse as more and more things are done digitally.

Said sandstorm scene, replete with a rather gruesome death for a ‘PG’ film, is the only thrill in the first third, and the film does drag for a while, but the performances are good [even if Gary Sinise wears some very odd eye makeup that makes him look like a drag queen] and De Palma’s usual cameraman Stephen H. Burum gives us some great camera moves which show us around the ship. Then a gas leak occurs, and for the next twenty minutes or so we are treated to a master class in sustained tension as things just get worse and worse. The special effects are superb, the editing is perfect and Ennio Morricone’s scoring, a simple synthesised beat with an organ that sometimes goes into full-blown orchestral emotion, perfectly backs up the action. This is De Palma working near his best, technically astounding, totally riveting and rather emotional. He also shows himself entirely comfortable in the world of special effects, never ignoring the human element and conveying a realistic sense of peril amongst all the spectacle.

It’s fair to say that after this the film never reaches those giddy heights again. There’s a considerable amount of suspense as the astronauts near the secret on Mars that will reveal everything, and a hugely entertaining performance from the underrated Don Cheadle to enjoy as Luke the survivor of the opening sequence, but the film refuses to give us the expected action climax. Then again, Mission To Mars often perversely refuses to show us what we might expect; for instance we don’t see any of the rockets taking off. Instead it gives us a potted evolution history and a possible explanation of our origins. The visuals alternate between being tacky and being rather cool, while the ideas are perhaps not as original as all that; Quatermass And The Pit offered up pretty much the same thing, and it seems that Prometheus, in turn, used the same basic concept. I love the ending anyway for its plain bizarreness and its ambition though I can’t stop wondering what the original conception would have been like.

Typically for De Palma, Mission To Mars echoes many other films while still being entirely its own movie. The Abyss and 2001: A Space Odyssey are two which especially came to mind when I last viewed the film. Now an especially criticised aspect of the picture is Morricone’s score, perhaps because it’s so different to the typical ‘sound’ of a film of this kind, but to me that just sums up the narrow-mindedness of some critics. The composer seems to emphasise the wonder and beauty of space and other worlds with some gorgeous pieces, while often using atypical instruments such as the electric guitar and the organ. His music for the final scenes is truly beautiful and uplifting. Maybe it’s a little corny, but some corn is good for you once in a while. There is a lot about this movie that doesn’t really work, but there are some very good things in it, it had ambition to spare, and I’m not sure I would want it any other way.

Rating: 7/10


Wow wow wow! No where will you find such an insightful review of a hugely underrated sci-fi gem like this film, than this thread! Thank you Dr Lenera for a balanced and revelatory review! I say revelatory because i didn't know some of the things that you have cited about Mission to Mars - like the fact it was originally based on a Disney theme park ride and it was well received in France. I find it a really intriguing film. Its quite unlike most of the other sci-fi pics of the time as you have said. The score by Morricone is really superb. Did you know i got my four year old boy (who's really into all things space) to watch it and he loved it! But then again he does have a wide ranging taste in films which i think he gets from his dad!

Once again thanks for an awesome review!



Thanks very much [and Mister Coe too] . And as that book, maybe one day.....got various things on the go for the website I work on......I forgot to mention going through all of Hitchcock's films too......though better off posting those on one of the Hitchcock threads maybe

_____________________________

check out more of my reviews on http://horrorcultfilms.co.uk/

(in reply to Nexus Wookie)
Post #: 14540
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 19/11/2012 12:45:02 PM   
Nexus Wookie


Posts: 2326
Joined: 24/9/2011
From: the Godcity

BLADE RUNNER

Blade Runner is without doubt, the greatest science fiction film ever made.

It is my favourite film. And upon viewing, it isnt hard to see why. It is a visually stunning, spectacular and unforgettable masterpiece. The imagery is so potent as to sear itself into the mind, its poetic language so perfect as to rival John Keats (Roy Batty's 'i've seen things' speech, infact its very similar to Keats' own ''On first looking into Chapmans Homer'' poem). Indeed, I can run out of all superlatives to lavish upon this masterpiece and still, I wont even come close to describing the beauty of this film.

From the opening shot over a breath taking view of the 'hades' landscape of a future L.A, bleak yet beautiful. Lights like distant stars flickering in the night, and fire erupting through towers towards the heavens from the bowels of the city.

It is a beautiful nightmare.

And of course Vangelis' majestic score, sending shivers down the spine of the beholder. A 'spinner' comes into shot flying towards the screen (the level of details in this film is truly astonishing!) Vangelis' soothing synth score swells up, and I have yet to hear music in a movie as majestic as that of Blade Runner. It is quite simply the greatest opening sequence ever put on film.

The story in brief, is about a bounty Hunter, Rick Deckard (Harrison Ford) who is tasked with 'retiring' four replicants (later five) who have gone AWOL, killing all the crew on an off world space shuttle before returning to earth. Deckard is tasked with finding them and retiring them. Of course, it is not as simple as it sounds. Along the way, Deckard meets and falls in love with Rachael, who is a replicant herself. Questions are asked about his own humanity - whether he himself is a replicant or not (i am from the school of thought that believes Deckard is human) and he finds the meaning of life through the death of a replicant.

The actors in the film are an inspired choice. From Harrison Ford as Deckard, Sean Young (Rachael), Daryl Hannah (Pris) and Rutger Hauer as Roy Batty, leader of the renegade androids. He is an enigmatic and fiery figure, sprouting poetry and not un-prone to fits of violence. But he is the beating heart of the film. And this is where I believe Deckard is a human, becuase he is cold, almost like an empty shell, wheras Roy Batty is the opposite, full of life, humour and love.

The level of detail in this film is truly astonishing, to the aztec like architecture of the sky scrapers, to the neon lit streets bathed in perpetual smoke and rain. It is a vision to beguile the sight! A jalgemation of the future (2019) and the past (1950/60's).

One of my favourite scenes in this film (or indeed ANY) is the poetic and poignant death scene of Roy Batty. He is holding a dove (symbol of life) and in his dying moment, his brilliant Soliloquy gives Deckard the meaning of life;

'' I've seen things you people wouldnt believe. Attack ships on fire off the coast of Orion. I watched C-beams glittering in the dark near the Tannhauser Gates. All those moments, will be lost like tears in rain. Time to die..''

There is so much one can read into about this majestic film. Indeed, the theme and motifs of the eye, and religious symbolism is quite prevalent. From the opening shots of an eye (Roy Batty's?) with the hades landscape reflected on it. To the scene in the eye shop where Roy and Leon interrogate Hannibal Chew. He (Chew) tells them he designed their eyes, to which Roy replies ''..if only you could see the things I have seen with YOUR eyes..''. The religious symbolism is clearer toward the end when Roy creates a stigmata by driving a nail through his hand. Also, he is holding a dove in his final speech (see above), which he releases, an allegory perhaps of his 'soul' ascending to heaven?

There are so many deeper themes running through this film, that I can write a 100 page essay on it! And I havent even started on the Deckard Vs Replicant debate! I will however state that I feel Deckard is HUMAN because if he were to be a replicant, then the contrast between Deckard's soulless humanity and Roy's poetic inhumanity would no longer work. But of course, there are evidence in the film to suggest he may be a REPLICANT. Among them is the 'unicorn dream' that Deckard has. Later we see Deckard find a unicorm origami outside his appartment (left by Gaff) suggesting perhaps that he (Gaff) knows of Deckards 'unicorn dream' or implanted memory which means Deckard is a replicant.

But Frank Darabont (Shawshank Redemption) makes a compelling case against the Unicorn theory on a mini doc titled 'Deck-A-Rep' on the excellent 5 Disc collector Edition. His theory is that the Unicorn 'dream' that Deckard has is in fact RACHAEL'S MEMORY! The wisdom being that Deckard already has access to Rachael's profile, and he knows the memory's which have been implanted in her. So along with the Spider memory, the Unicorn may have also been Rachael's memory, and Deckard may have been pondering upon this specific memory when we see him sat at the piano. As for the Unicorn origami, it is nothing more than a sign left by Gaff to show that he too knows about Rachael. It's almost telling him 'go ahead, take her and run' and Deckard gives a knowing nod.

Ridley was of the opinion that Deckard is a replicant, hence all the clues left in the director's cut version. On the contrary, Harrison Ford was against that idea and believed Deckard was a human ''otherwise, the audience would have no one to root for'' went his argument. There are arguments (both valid) FOR and AGAINST the human/ replicant theory. In the end it is up to the viewer to make up his/her mind.

This debate is part of the lore of Blade Runner. We will never get a definitive answer to this question, just like the briefcase in Pulp Fiction.

10/10



< Message edited by Nexus Wookie -- 23/11/2012 6:05:38 PM >


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Post #: 14541
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 19/11/2012 8:39:09 PM   
evil bill


Posts: 6730
Joined: 19/7/2006
From: mordor/ uk
quote:

ORIGINAL: Dr Lenera


quote:

ORIGINAL: evil bill

quote:

ORIGINAL: Dr Lenera

I agree, one of the weaker Corman/Poe's, looks great of course and is effectively morbid and depressing, but is rather lacking generally. Think you missed out Pit And The Pendulum though?!

And I love De Palma's Obsession

I know your under pressure mate but old age may be creeping up on you too
Page 484 IE one back and even David read it last week.
But to save you flicking back here it is,and yes i am doing them by the year,so you know whats next???
quote:




quote:

ORIGINAL: DAVID GILLESPIE






quote:

ORIGINAL: evil bill

The Pit and the Pendulum (1961)

 
10/10

Totally agree with you on this, a timeless classic. Certainly does not look low budget. Spot on review, mate.




Thanks mate glad to see your still floating around,and hope to get up the next couple of reviews soon,as i'm just about to watch??? now that would be telling.




Sorry mate missed it, yeah must be old age, or effects of too much partying over the years, or something......anyway,another great review, this film is the first one of the series I saw, I think, and still one of the best-I remember getting real nervous during the pendulum scene as a lad...

There was a documetery a while ago on Horror films,and they talked to the actor involed in that scene and Corman too.The look of fear on that poor chaps eyes where for real as it was a very dangerous shot due to the height/weight of the pendulum which was eighteen feet long and weighed over a ton, and was constructed with a realistic rubber cutting blade. The pendulum was rigged from the top of the sound stage thirty-five feet high in the air,as Corman said" At first we tried to use a rubberized blade and that's why it got stuck on Kerr's chest. We then switched to a sharp metalized blade covered with steel paint. The problem was to get it in exactly the right position so it would slash John's shirt without actually cutting him. To guard against this we put a steel band around his waist where the pendulum crosses. He was a good sport about it but noticed him perspiring a good bit and no wonder. That pendulum was carving out a 50 foot arc just above his body."
They don't make them like this any more.
And Yes the partying and something else has taken it's toil on us folks.

< Message edited by evil bill -- 19/11/2012 8:43:23 PM >


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Post #: 14542
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 19/11/2012 9:21:40 PM   
evil bill


Posts: 6730
Joined: 19/7/2006
From: mordor/ uk
quote:

ORIGINAL: Nexus Wookie



BLADE RUNNER


Blade Runner is without doubt, the greatest science fiction film ever made.

It is my favourite film. And upon viewing, it isnt hard to see why. It is a visually stunning, spectacular and unforgettable masterpiece. The imagery is so potent as to sear itself into the mind, its poetic language so perfect as to rival John Keats (Roy Batty's 'i've seen things' speech, infact its very similar to Keats' own ''On first looking into Chapmans Homer'' poem). Indeed, I can run out of all superlatives to lavish upon this masterpiece and still, I wont even come close to describing the beauty of this film.

From the opening shot over a breath taking view of the 'hades' landscape of a future L.A, bleak yet beautiful. Lights like distant stars flickering in the night, and fire erupting through towers towards the heavens from the bowels of the city.

It is a beautiful nightmare.

And of course Vangelis' majestic score, sending shivers down the spine of the beholder. A 'spinner' comes into shot flying towards the screen (the level of details in this film is truly astonishing!) Vangelis' soothing synth score swells up, and I have yet to hear music in a movie as majestic as that of Blade Runner. It is quite simply the greatest opening sequence ever put on film.

The story in brief, is about a bounty Hunter, Rick Deckard (Harrison Ford) who is tasked with 'retiring' four replicants (later five) who have gone AWOL, killing all the crew on an off world space shuttle before returning to earth. Deckard is tasked with finding them and retiring them. Of course, it is not as simple as it sounds. Along the way, Deckard meets and falls in love with Rachael, who is a replicant herself. Questions are asked about his own humanity - whether he himself is a replicant or not (i am from the school of thought that believes Deckard is human) and he finds the meaning of life through the death of a replicant.

The actors in the film are an inspired choice. From Harrison Ford as Deckard, Sean Young (Rachael), Daryl Hannah (Pris) and Rutger Hauer as Roy Batty, leader of the renegade androids. He is an enigmatic and fiery figure, sprouting poetry and not un-prone to fits of violence. But he is the beating heart of the film. And this is where I believe Deckard is a human, becuase he is cold, almost like an empty shell, wheras Roy Batty is the opposite, full of life, humour and love.

The level of detail in this film is truly astonishing, to the aztec like architecture of the sky scrapers, to the neon lit streets bathed in perpetual smoke and rain. It is a vision to beguile the sight! A jalgemation of the future (2019) and the past (1950/60's).

One of my favourite scenes in this film (or indeed ANY) is the poetic and poignant death scene of Roy Batty. He is holding a dove (symbol of life) and in his dying moment, his brilliant Soliloquy gives Deckard the meaning of life;

'' I've seen things you people wouldnt believe. Attack ships on fire off the coast of Orion. I watched C-beams glittering in the dark near the Tannhauser Gates. All those moments, will be lost like tears in rain. Time to die..''

There is so much one can read into about this majestic film. Indeed, the theme and motifs of the eye, and religious symbolism is quite prevalent. From the opening shots of an eye (Roy Batty's?) with the hades landscape reflected on it. To the scene in the eye shop where Roy and Leon interrogate Hannibal Chew. He (Chew) tells them he designed their eyes, to which Roy replies ''..if only you could see the things I have seen with YOUR eyes..''. The religious symbolism is clearer toward the end when Roy creates a stigmata by driving a nail through his hand. Also, he is holding a dove in his final speech (see above), which he releases, an allegory perhaps of his 'soul' ascending to heaven?

There are so many deeper themes running through this film, that I can write a 100 page essay on it! And I havent even started on the Deckard Vs Replicant debate! I will however state that I feel Deckard is HUMAN because if he were to be a replicant, then the contrast between Deckard's soulless humanity and Roy's poetic inhumanity would no longer work. But of course, there are evidence in the film to suggest he may be a REPLICANT. Among them is the 'unicorn dream' that Deckard has. Later we see Deckard find a unicorm origami outside his appartment (left by Gaff) suggesting perhaps that he (Gaff) knows of Deckards 'unicorn dream' or implanted memory which means Deckard is a replicant.

But Frank Darabont (Shawshank Redemption) makes a compelling case against the Unicorn theory on a mini doc titled 'Deck-A-Rep' on the excellent 5 Disc collector Edition. His theory is that the Unicorn 'dream' that Deckard has is in fact RACHAEL'S MEMORY! The wisdom being that Deckard already has access to Rachael's profile, and he knows the memory's which have been implanted in her. So along with the Spider memory, the Unicorn may have also been Rachael's memory, and Deckard may have been pondering upon this specific memory when we see him sat at the piano. As for the Unicorn origami, it is nothing more than a sign left by Gaff to show that he too knows about Rachael. It's almost telling him 'go ahead, take her and run' and Deckard gives a knowing nod.

Ridley was of the opinion that Deckard is a replicant, hence all the clues left in the director's cut version. On the contrary, Harrison Ford was against that idea and believed Deckard was a human ''otherwise, the audience would have no one to root for'' went his argument. There are arguments (both valid) FOR and AGAINST the human/ replicant theory. In the end it is up to the viewer to make up his/her mind.

This debate is part of the lore of Blade Runner. We will never get a definitive answer to this question, just like the briefcase in Pulp Fiction.

10/10



Awesome write up,you really love your sci/fi,and this thread is perfect for these great films,that just don't always fit into a box,and Blade Runner is one of those films that can't be shoved in just one box.Your love for Sci/fi and this film shine in this review mate,so here's an old one of mine.;
BLADE RUNNER (1982)
In a cyberpunk vision of the future, man has developed the technology to create replicants, human clones used to serve in the colonies outside Earth but with fixed lifespans. In Los Angeles, 2019, Deckard(Harrison Ford) is a Blade Runner, a cop who specializes in terminating replicants. Originally in retirement, he is forced to re-enter the force when six replicants escape from an off world colony to Earth.The city that Deckard must search for his prey is a huge, sprawling, bleak vision of the future. This film questions what it is to be human, and why life is so precious.

I have always loved science fiction in films and TV programmes,even shows like shows Star Trek,the original and the Star Wars trilogy,but these pale in comparsion to Kubrick's '2001: A Space Odyssey' which is the greatest Sci/Fi of them all I am not hesitant to say that i am not that keen on Spielberg's definition of SF- ET, Close Encounters etc. A L I E N  1979 original now that was a great Sci/Fi horror movie,and i never thought Scott could come close to matching this.Well as a Sci/Fi movie,it is one of the greatest films ever made, up there with 2001: A Space Odyssey,and for me Scotts second greatest movie ever.Though misunderstood when it first hit theaters, the influence of Ridley Scott's mysterious, film noir sci/fi has deepened with time. A visually remarkable, achingly human sci-fi masterpiece. Upon 1st viewing back in 1982,(i was on hoilday in Canada at the time,but still had to see a film or two)i disliked the vocie over that explained everything,and that happy bullshit ending,but was still blown away by the scale and visual style.You might expect a futuristic run-of-the-mill 80's shoot-em-up  like of Outland,which was the way it was avertised at the time,but it's so much more. What you get is a film so deep that it is difficult to grasp the depth of it on 1st viewing,as there is so much symbolism,and unawsnered questions that i was left stunned. The film is hauntingly beautiful, and i doubt that these screen landscapes could be reproduced today as well as they were here even with CGI. The plot centres around the question of humanity,what is it to be human,something we take for granted. It is not an auctioneer, which was probably what audiences expected when they walked into theatres in the 80s, causing the film to fail commercially.It is not for the adrenaline junkie, nor for those who like flashy gadgets and bright explosions, with a healthy Hollywood-made dose of convincing storyline spoon-fed for their satisfaction.

From the opening shot of a Los Angeles cityscape at night in the year 2019, it is clear that Scott has conjured up something special. The film is set in the apocalyptic, suggestively post-war future Earth, where there seems to be a lag in technology. Perhaps there was a war which ravaged the world, forcing humans to migrate,and rebuild, explaining the retro technology. If you're planning to take sides in this film, you will be pleasantly if not unnervingly surprised,as there are no sides no real good guys or bad,well maybe one?.Harrison Ford plays the reluctant, burned out Blade Runner very well,in fact his best role,even though he was not that found of Ridley or the script. His character is drab and dull, as it was meant to be, look at him in the Spinner on the way to Tyrell corporation- pure boredom.And going by interviews after the movie's release,he admitted to having no interest and a dislike of Scott,and it works in the most crazy way. He hates his job in fantasy and in real life,he hated this movie,it was long hours and draining in every way. Rutger Hauer gives the greatest performance of his career  in this film, playing Roy Batty, Replicant 'project manager',he dominates the later part of the film. He is simpley awesome and in the end speech,well he steals the show in one of the Greatest endings i have ever seen, his performance alone makes this film a Classic.The nail thought the hand and the releasing of the Dove is pure religious symbolism,along with many other scenes in the build up to this ending.If you like Roy is the son and of course Tyrell the creator.Sean Young is also superb in her role as the ultimate replicant woman who Deckard falls in love with.Not forgeting also Daryl Hannah as the beautiful but deadly Pris,in an outstanding all time best,that is of course untill Kill Bill.

The ending is beautiful and now complete with the Final Cut on Blu-Ray, and the score by Vangelis is perfect just unbeatable.All in all, the film is excellent,brilliantly directed by Ridley Scott, innovative and stunning imagery underlined by Vangelis' superb score, and plenty to think about.The wizardry of Designers Lawrence G. Paull, Douglas Trumbull and Syd Mead,is awesome,and Doug worked with the best on 2001. These days, it's almost impossible to find a gritty science fiction motion picture that doesn't owe at least a small debt to BLADE RUNNER in visual style.This was the best Sci/Fi movie of the 80's and beyond,and the Final Cut is without doubt Scotts vision finally complete.


And talking of Douglas Trumbull here's another 80's Sci/Fi that can't be pigeon-holed with a fabulous cast that includes Dennis Quaid, Kate Capshaw,Christopher Plummer, Eddie Albert and Max Von Sydow, a reasonable budget and a solid story,but it bombed at the box office.

Dreamscape (1984)
Brilliant researchers Lillian Reynolds(Louise Fletcher) and Michael Brace(Christopher Walken) have developed a system of recording and playing back actual experiences of people. Once the capability of tapping into "higher brain functions" is added in, and you can literally jump into someone else's head and play back recordings of what he or she was thinking, feeling, seeing, etc., at the time of the recording, the applications for the project quickly spiral out of control. While Michael Brace uses the system to become close again to Karen Brace(Natalie Wood), his estranged wife who also works on the project, others start abusing it for intense sexual experiences and other logical but morally questionable purposes. The government tries to kick Michael and Lillian off the project once the vast military potential of the technology is discovered. It soon becomes obvious that the government is interested in more than just missile guidance systems. The lab starts producing mind torture recordings and other psychosis inducing material. When one of the researchers dies and tapes the experience of death, Michael is convinced that he must playback this tape to honor the memory of the researcher and to become enlightened. When another researcher dies during playback the tape is locked away and Michael has to fight against his former colleagues and the government lackeys that now run his lab in order to play back and confront the scariest thing any of us will ever face death itself.

BRAINSTORM 1983,another sci/fi??movie box office flop,yet a stunning movie by Doug Trumbull(Silent Running,2001,Close Encounters, etc)The visuals as you'd expect from this director/Visual Effects Wizard are stunning for the early 80's .The acting is good to excellent,with all giving there all,in a movie that pushes the boundaries of science fiction?in a mind blowing way.Movies like The Thirteenth Floor, Dark City or the Matrix came after this cult classic,using it's ideas arguably to better effect.But this was the daddy of them all,and the film leaves a lingering uncertainty as to what out ultimate destiny or origin is?. Good science fiction probes us and questions our limitations,which is why good Sci/Fi hardly ever breaks the box office,but has staying power like 2001 or Blade Runner,which also bombed at the box office.


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Post #: 14543
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 19/11/2012 10:46:48 PM   
Nexus Wookie


Posts: 2326
Joined: 24/9/2011
From: the Godcity
Wow thanks for bringing those other films to my attention evil bill! I'll check them out. And i concur - Blade Runner would be less of a film without the input of such genius' as Douglas Trumball and Syd Mead - even Jean Girard Moebius aswell (we know Scott drew heavily on Moebius' style) it is the coming togethet of all these people which has helped to make Blade Runner the msterpiece it is today. You mentioned 2001 in your review - that also is another stunning achievement in sci-fi cinema. God i so wish Kubrick was still alive....

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Post #: 14544
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 20/11/2012 8:05:45 PM   
evil bill


Posts: 6730
Joined: 19/7/2006
From: mordor/ uk
quote:

ORIGINAL: Nexus Wookie

Wow thanks for bringing those other films to my attention evil bill! I'll check them out. And i concur - Blade Runner would be less of a film without the input of such genius' as Douglas Trumball and Syd Mead - even Jean Girard Moebius Oswell (we know Scott drew heavily on Moebius' style) it is the coming together of all these people which has helped to make Blade Runner the masterpiece it is today. You mentioned 2001 in your review - that also is another stunning achievement in sci-fi cinema. God i so wish Kubrick was still alive....

Well now you mention the late great Kubrick here's a couple of revamped reviews i'd planned for you,knowing what a big sci/fi fan you are.
2001;A SPACE ODYSSEY (1968)
 This This is the story of evolution from Ape to Man to Starchild. Sometime in the distant past,when man was ape something or some force nudged evolution by placing a monolith on Earth. Evolution then enabled humankind to reach the moon's surface, where yet another monolith is found, one that signals the monolith placers that humankind has evolved thus far. Now a race begins between computers (HAL) and human (Bowman) to reach the monolith placers,to learn the truth . The winner will achieve the next step in evolution, whatever that may be.

Released 8TH April 1968,Stanley Kubrick's 2001 was a major flop and nearly brought MGM to it's knees,it was a cult hit with die hard Sci/Fi fans,and hippie's who wanted a trip without acid.But thing's where about to change big time with the moon landing,which finally got Joe public to think it was possible to go to the stars.The story of mans rise from Ape to spaceman,and then to Infinity suddenly had people talking and re-watching,and for a movie over fifty years old to still have people talking about it's deeper meanings,is amazing.

As a movie it is just pure cinema at it's best,with special effects that have stood the test of time,they are still mind blowing images and believable,anb the special effects that won Kubrick his only Oscar are the most stunning effects,before that age of CGI which could ever match this,not yet??It was way ahead of it's time on a technical level,and as a insight into the future, it's time,look at the gravity system,frozen bodies to be reanimated later,the spacestation,flat screen TV's etc etc.The most accurate depiction of space travel to date,with the use of silence that fills the space scenes,not only serves its purpose as accurate science,(IE no air no sound) but also adds to the mood of the film.This is the film that really put the science in "science fiction",with its depiction of space travel and mankind's future,in fact it was so far ahead of its time that humanity still hasn't caught up,Clarke and Kubrick looked at 2001 as a prime date for mans move into deep space,but it's still hasn't happened. 

It has an awesome story that still has everyone still talking,trying to figure out what Kubrick and A.C.Clarke where up to,what is it really about.Clarke himself said that himself and Kubrick wanted it to be that way,with more questions than answers.That saying it has a great plot with a number of threads that lead to a mind blowing ending,that never fails to impress.But let's look at the bare bones of the story,with it's short lead in about apes becoming more intelligent,though with a violent rise to power after being influenced by an alien force,represented by the famous black monolith.Which appears later again,and each time it triggers certain events integral to the film,and to the story of what it means to be human, and where the human race is going.We next see this monolith on the Moon where suddenly it emits some sort of sound/radio wave out into deep space,have it's creators left it here for us to find and go to the next stage??Well off they go in search of this source of creation??,and this is where the film twists again,as we meet the computerized villain of this film.With extreme close-ups of it's glowing red "eye" to show the coldness and determination of HAL 9000,we meet are own fears of technology controlling way to much of are lives,in fact we are becoming de humanized??or how technology of the future will take over humanity and decide the course of our lives.Through the use of silence and the darkness of space itself,with the cold, calculated actions of HAL 9000 a mood of isolation is created. Dave and his crewmen are isolated between earth and jupiter, with nowhere to escape,so they must move forward,only when mankind is under preassure it seems,will he take a true step forward letting go of the past.

The controversial ending of 2001 seems to be a big sticking point with those that find it just to vauge,but instead of trying to give my opinion on what i belive it means i'l just say this.Every time i watch this masterpiece i come up with a different meaning to the enigma that is the film as a whole,but it seems to get better as you get older as you open your mind to deeper feelings and emotions.It is not an easy watch as it movie's at a very slow pace,but this is a thought provoking movie not an auctioneer sci/fi like Star Wars,or the latest breed of Fantasy movies.It is a film that requires you to relax,let yourself experience the strange and beautiful images without feeling guilty that there is no complex plot or deep meanimgful complex characterization.There's no neat resolution, no definitive full stop, because then you the audience would stop thinking after the final scene and head home happy you got just another Sci/Fi fantasy.But Kubrick isn't going to let us off lightly,he wants us to think not be guided by others,but use are own minds,to save whats left of are humanity before it's to late.Personally i think this is the Greatest Sci/Fi movie of all time,and Stanley Kubrick's finest masterpiece,maybe even the greatest movie of the 20TH century.10/10


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Post #: 14545
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 20/11/2012 8:59:53 PM   
evil bill


Posts: 6730
Joined: 19/7/2006
From: mordor/ uk
A CLOCKWORK ORANGE (1971)
 Classical Music-loving proto-punk Alex (Malcolm McDowell) and his "Droogs" spend their nights getting high at the Korova Milkbar before embarking on "a little of the old ultraviolence," such as terrorizing a writer, Mr. Alexander (Patrick Magee), and gang raping his wife (who later dies as a result). After Alex is jailed for bludgeoning the Cat Lady (Miriam Karlin) to death with one of her phallic sculptures, Alex submits to the Ludovico behavior modification technique to earn his freedom; he's conditioned to abhor violence through watching gory movies, and even his adored Beethoven is turned against him. Returned to the world defenseless, Alex becomes the victim of his prior victims, with Mr. Alexander using Beethoven's Ninth to inflict the greatest pain of all. When society sees what the state has done to Alex, however, the politically expedient move is made.

From its opening shot of Malcolm McDowell staring with evil intent directly into the camera (which pulls back to reveal him drinking a glass of milk), Stanley Kubrick's brilliant AClockwork Orange,which unlike 2001 became a big hit in the States hot on the heels of New York Film Critics Circle awards as Best Film, Best Director, and Best Screenplay, Kubrick received Oscar nominations in all three categories.It was based on the chilling masterpiece by Anthony Burgess's a culture-shaking novel about a young man growing into adulthood,and set in an unidentified future .The first part of the film shows Alex McDowel unable to shake his huge problem with authority figures,and his DROOGS  indulging in what they refer to as "a little bit of the old ultra-violence." Alex later on gets caught and forced to undergo controversial treatment that will make it impossible for him to commit violent acts??
 
This prophetic satire of crime and punishment, redemption and free will directed with assurance and filled with the cynicism,and paranoia.It has the visual flair we expect from Stanley but also has a lot of sex and violence that is shocking,but still you can have no doubt this is Kubrick at his best and classic cinema.Kubrick's take on crime and punishment,would many years later raise it's dark head again in NBK Oliver Stone's own misunderstood satire.Film fans and critics,of the time where upset at it's use of "ultra-violence"even though Straw Dogs of the same year to be honest was more violent.But then all of Kubrick´s films have generated controversy of some sort, but this one had outright hostility from the press.So Kubrick withdrew the film from distribution in the UK, after reading newspaper reports of people dressing up as Alex and his Droogs and meting out their own brand of ultra-violence (it was subsequently re released after his death). One thing is for sure,no one who has seen it has ever been able to hear "Singin' in the Rain"in the same innocent way.When Alex and the DROOGS break into a house and rape and abuse the elderly couple therein,"Singing in the Rain" is played by Alex and co.Also during some Beethoven,once again the Violence is in your face with only that very dark scene of humor as relief with new use made odd phallic work of art??.

Malcolm McDowell staring in his first major lead role,gives a career-defining performance,as Alex who may be a sadist, but the way the state trys to subdue and control him,becomes another violent act, rather than a solution. Kubrick's movie is a show case for Malcolm,but it is also a ultra-stylish, sci-fi cult film ,that is just as unsettling and shocking today as the day it was released.Casting a coldly pessimistic view on the then-future of the late '70s-early '80s, Kubrick and production designer John Barry created a world of high-tech cultural decay, which is not unlike what surrounds us now,if you take away some of the dated 70's look.There are so many elements of this film that bring it together and make you totally enjoy the story,and many moments you want to look away.

The music in the film is one such example, at times it's beautiful and at times dark and disturbing, setting the right tone for the scene.It hasn't dated to well as we see ye old vinyl records,IBM typewriter etc lying around,and the Violence is not as gory as some modern movies,but it is intense.And it's chilling look at aimless louts still rings a bell even today,and maybe more so than ever,plus it's feeling that the State has only one way of dealing with violence,is violence.Funny,yes dark and chilling well judge for yourself,as technically this is operatic,colorful, and brilliantly  photographed and overwhelms the senses.It is a great sci-fi film from the greatest director of them all,who was never afraid of what critics had to say,and pushed the art of cinema like no other before or after.9/10




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Post #: 14546
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 21/11/2012 12:12:02 AM   
Mister Coe

 

Posts: 1561
Joined: 20/10/2012
Dreamscape? Seem to remember loving that one back in the day...

And it's on Netflix!

Will deffo be getting back to you on that one...

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Post #: 14547
RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 21/11/2012 12:34:31 AM   
Nexus Wookie


Posts: 2326
Joined: 24/9/2011
From: the Godcity
quote:

ORIGINAL: evil bill

quote:

ORIGINAL: Nexus Wookie

Wow thanks for bringing those other films to my attention evil bill! I'll check them out. And i concur - Blade Runner would be less of a film without the input of such genius' as Douglas Trumball and Syd Mead - even Jean Girard Moebius Oswell (we know Scott drew heavily on Moebius' style) it is the coming together of all these people which has helped to make Blade Runner the masterpiece it is today. You mentioned 2001 in your review - that also is another stunning achievement in sci-fi cinema. God i so wish Kubrick was still alive....

Well now you mention the late great Kubrick here's a couple of revamped reviews i'd planned for you,knowing what a big sci/fi fan you are.
2001;A SPACE ODYSSEY (1968)

The controversial ending of 2001 seems to be a big sticking point with those that find it just to vauge,but instead of trying to give my opinion on what i belive it means i'l just say this.Every time i watch this masterpiece i come up with a different meaning to the enigma that is the film as a whole,but it seems to get better as you get older as you open your mind to deeper feelings and emotions.It is not an easy watch as it movie's at a very slow pace,but this is a thought provoking movie not an auctioneer sci/fi like Star Wars,or the latest breed of Fantasy movies.It is a film that requires you to relax,let yourself experience the strange and beautiful images without feeling guilty that there is no complex plot or deep meanimgful complex characterization.There's no neat resolution, no definitive full stop, because then you the audience would stop thinking after the final scene and head home happy you got just another Sci/Fi fantasy.But Kubrick isn't going to let us off lightly,he wants us to think not be guided by others,but use are own minds,to save whats left of are humanity before it's to late.Personally i think this is the Greatest Sci/Fi movie of all time,and Stanley Kubrick's finest masterpiece,maybe even the greatest movie of the 20TH century.10/10



A superb review evil bill! Your last paragraph is right on the button - its almost like the anti-Star Wars (which is no easy feat seeing as Star Wars wasreleased years later! ). This is another film which i love coming back to from time to time. And as you say theres always something you can take with each viewing. I simply worship this film - such a stunning, brain boggling, beautifully realised film. I remember being awed by it on first viewing. When i sat through it all and got to that awesome ending i just sat there speechless. Trust me there will never be another film like 2001 ever again. A science-fiction masterpiece which has influenced everything from Alien to Moon. I think i know which film i'm going to be rewatching next!


< Message edited by Nexus Wookie -- 21/11/2012 9:08:21 AM >


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RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 21/11/2012 12:47:15 AM   
Nexus Wookie


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quote:

ORIGINAL: evil bill

A CLOCKWORK ORANGE (1971)
 Classical Music-loving proto-punk Alex (Malcolm McDowell) and his "Droogs" spend their nights getting high at the Korova Milkbar before embarking on "a little of the old ultraviolence," such as terrorizing a writer, Mr. Alexander (Patrick Magee), and gang raping his wife (who later dies as a result). After Alex is jailed for bludgeoning the Cat Lady (Miriam Karlin) to death with one of her phallic sculptures, Alex submits to the Ludovico behavior modification technique to earn his freedom; he's conditioned to abhor violence through watching gory movies, and even his adored Beethoven is turned against him. Returned to the world defenseless, Alex becomes the victim of his prior victims, with Mr. Alexander using Beethoven's Ninth to inflict the greatest pain of all. When society sees what the state has done to Alex, however, the politically expedient move is made.

From its opening shot of Malcolm McDowell staring with evil intent directly into the camera (which pulls back to reveal him drinking a glass of milk), Stanley Kubrick's brilliant AClockwork Orange,which unlike 2001 became a big hit in the States hot on the heels of New York Film Critics Circle awards as Best Film, Best Director, and Best Screenplay, Kubrick received Oscar nominations in all three categories.It was based on the chilling masterpiece by Anthony Burgess's a culture-shaking novel about a young man growing into adulthood,and set in an unidentified future .The first part of the film shows Alex McDowel unable to shake his huge problem with authority figures,and his DROOGS  indulging in what they refer to as "a little bit of the old ultra-violence." Alex later on gets caught and forced to undergo controversial treatment that will make it impossible for him to commit violent acts??





Ah! Another of my favourite Kubrick/ sci-fi films! I simply adore this masterpiece I rewatched it a while ago and it remains as potent as ever. Its a really dark (and really hilarious at times) dystopian nightmare and Malcolm McDowell's finest hour. You cannot keep your eyes off him! And the old Ludwig inspired score is magnificent. I wasnt even born when this movie came out but its one of my all time greats! Thanks evil bill for a brilliant review!

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RE: WEIRD/STRANGE favorite movies fan base? - 21/11/2012 8:43:00 AM   
losthighway


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After reading some very positive reviews for this one I finally sat down and watched it last night. It's an interesting film with an impressive cast, has a fantastic central performance from McCord and is darkly comedic throughout up until its inevitable conclusion. However, the avant-garde scenes where much of the gore takes place are visually striking but feel a bit tacked into the narrative and I couldn't get past the feeling that I'd seen it all done before in Ginger Snaps several years previous with werewolves instead of body horror. It's a certainly a film that's worth hunting down, although whether I would sit through it again is another thing.

Overall: 3.5/5

< Message edited by losthighway -- 21/11/2012 8:44:33 AM >


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