Philippa Boyens On The Hobbit: There And Back Again (Full Version)

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Empire Admin -> Philippa Boyens On The Hobbit: There And Back Again (17/3/2014 8:09:19 PM)

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mike2005 -> There and yawn again. (17/3/2014 8:09:19 PM)

Not really fussed on the Hobbit films, I absolutely loved The Lord Of The Rings Trilogy but this just doesn't work for me. The over reliance on CGI is shocking stretching the book out into 3 films is just too much.The Dwarves are interchangeable with the exception of two or three. It hink it lacks the emotional wallop of the Lord Of The Rings.




Oroborous -> Who cares? (17/3/2014 8:23:06 PM)

Jackson, Boyens, etc. should feel ashamed that they've come out with something so lifeless, flimsy and overbearingly pointless, especially considering they also made the simply outstanding Lord of the Rings trilogy. They seem to have gone out of their way to sour the legacy of their own great achievements by abandoning any adherence to what made that trilogy so fantastic, relying instead upon visuals and story telling one would expect from a cheap, tie-in computer game. I don't know how they can stand to partake in any publicity for this after having so blatantly disposed of their artistic integrity.




bb -> I don't care, either (17/3/2014 9:48:02 PM)

THE HOBBIT: THE DESOLATION OF SMAUG didn't deserve the five stars this magazine gave. Not even the appearance of Smaug was enough to convince me that I have totally lost my enthusiasm for THE HOBBIT, and so has Peter Jackson, who if you may remember, wasn't going to direct this in the first place. He may be a Tolkien fan, but the passion that he had during the RINGS trilogy has long burnt out in his eyes.




Chrislynn -> Spoilers = more AV crap (18/3/2014 12:36:29 AM)

I'd rather see a faithful rendition of The Hobbit than the new-and-improved version by the Freddie Krueger of NZ. Jackson has replaced the magic and imagination of Tolkien's Middle Earth with over-the-top special effects and CGI from Weta, wiped his feet on canon, and spit on the true Master of Middle Earth's legendarium.

As to the director being a fan of Tolkien, I find that hard to believe when he hadn't even read the book when he first broached the idea of LotR. More likely, he was a fan of the % of big bucks he'd get from all those hardcore Tolkien fans he promised New Line would show up for FotR.

Thank God for Christopher Tolkien and copyright laws.




LeonaBob -> Well, I care. Rather a lot, actually. (18/3/2014 1:41:13 AM)

Life-long Tolkien fan (yes, a decade or two before LOTR movies) and I have been absolutely captivated by this rendition of the story. Can understand it may not be to all tastes, but am getting a wee bit sad about the negativity. Don't like, don't watch, I guess... But it strikes me that a certain author was also inclined to get carried away... Anyway, I am desperate to see how part three is handled and but will be sorry that it has to end.




LeonaBob -> Well, I care. Rather a lot, actually. (18/3/2014 1:41:19 AM)

Life-long Tolkien fan (yes, a decade or two before LOTR movies) and I have been absolutely captivated by this rendition of the story. Can understand it may not be to all tastes, but am getting a wee bit sad about the negativity. Don't like, don't watch, I guess... But it strikes me that a certain author was also inclined to get carried away... Anyway, I am desperate to see how part three is handled and but will be sorry that it has to end.




Brian Boru -> Coming a long way and coming into their own. (18/3/2014 3:43:03 AM)

Alternatively why couldn't we have gone a long way more with Bard and Thranduil to see the firestorm on Esgaroth and with Beorn and the White Council to see the firestorm on Dol Guldur. And in my mind the only Dwarves that should come into their own are Thorin, Fili, Kili, Balin and Gloin with the rest being something like extras.




Jyslinn -> Some disappointment (18/3/2014 6:31:47 AM)

I am a little disappointed that Bofur is going to be more emphasized. While I like the character, it seems to be it should be Thorin, Kili and Fili and of course, most importantly, Bilbo. Tauriel and Kili should not have a romantic angle. As far as the movies, I love them. They've fleshed out the books.




Halfling -> Rift?? (18/3/2014 1:35:57 PM)

A rift bewteen the dwarves is not the only one - there's a fairly big rift bewteen me and the writers at the moment. This story would have had so much more emotion and depth if they'd stuck to the book i.e. no dwarf spilt at Laketown, no injury to Kili spawning THAT moment, and far less orc slaying by that pesky Greenleaf chap. And yes, far less CGI - it still looks like a computer game in places. I reeeeally hope there's no more deviations to come!! Rant over (PS I actually still love the writers dearly, but they're not my best friends at the moment!!!!)




elab49 -> RE: Spoilers = more AV crap (18/3/2014 8:54:19 PM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: Chrislynn

I'd rather see a faithful rendition of The Hobbit than the new-and-improved version by the Freddie Krueger of NZ. Jackson has replaced the magic and imagination of Tolkien's Middle Earth with over-the-top special effects and CGI from Weta, wiped his feet on canon, and spit on the true Master of Middle Earth's legendarium.

As to the director being a fan of Tolkien, I find that hard to believe when he hadn't even read the book when he first broached the idea of LotR. More likely, he was a fan of the % of big bucks he'd get from all those hardcore Tolkien fans he promised New Line would show up for FotR.

Thank God for Christopher Tolkien and copyright laws.


Good you found it hard to believe given he read the book when he was a teenager...




Chrislynn -> RE: Philippa Boyens On The Hobbit: There And Back Again (18/3/2014 11:09:37 PM)

quote:


Good you found it hard to believe given he read the book when he was a teenager...


Wrong. Jackson read a tie-in book version of the Bakshi movie when he was 17. He did not read Tolkien's book until he was thinking of doing his own film version of LotR. That's why Boyen's was originally brought aboard: she supposedly knows her canon, although you wouldn't know it after seeing AUJ and DOS.




beautiful_night -> The Hobbit movies are true masterpieces (12/6/2014 2:31:00 PM)

Part 1

The Hobbit films have the same high artistic quality as the LOTR films. I had my doubts before I went to see 'An Unexpected Journey', but afterwards I had to admit, that Peter Jackson and his crew had re-created the magic of LOTR and they had even succeeded in making everything about Middle-Earth feel fresh.

Having said that, I still think that LOTR is the best of the two trilogies. But I consider all 5-6 films to be masterpieces.

The fact that the Hobbit movies contain exactly the same mood, same spirit and same magic as the Lord of the Rings trilogy did, really makes me wonder, what on earth it was that all of these negative persons liked about The Lord of the Rings?

Some people have critized the beginning of "An Unexpected Journey" for being too slow and too goofy. They seem to forget, that it's only the very first scenes with the dwarves (in Bilbo's home), that have a light, humorous tone. After the dish washing the tone gets more serious, and after that there are only very few jokes in the rest of the movies. "The Fellowship of the Ring" had exactly the same goofy humor with Bilbo's description of the food-loving, nose-picking hobbits, the old hobbit doing his best to look grumpy because his wife considers Gandalf to be a troublemaker, Bilbo hiding from the Sackville-Bagginses, Merry and Pippin stealing Gandalf's fireworks (and later on stealing the farmer's vegetables) and Bilbo's cheerful speech at his birthday party. And even after Gandalf's return to Frodo and the departure from the Shire there were plenty of jokes from Merry and Pippin and Gimli.




beautiful_night -> The Hobbit movies are true masterpieces (12/6/2014 2:35:43 PM)

Part 2

"The Desolation of Smaug" has been accused of being one action scene after another. I find this accusation very strange and unjustified, since there's basically only five action scenes in entire movie. The first one (Bilbo being attacked by spiders and fighting back with his sword) doesn't occure before we're 26 minutes into the movie (and it's 6 minutes long). After that we have to wait about 15 minutes for the second action scene (the river chase, which is 8 minutes long). And the third action scene (Gandalf in Dol Goldur) doesn't come until 49 minutes later (and it's 3 minutes long). The fourth scene (elves and dwarves vs. orcs in Laketown) and the fifth scene (Bilbo and dwarves vs. Smaug the dragon) are both played out within the last 30 minutes of the movie.

So the question remains: Since there are only a total of 47 minutes action in "The Desolation of Smaug", what happens in the other 104 minutes (end credits not included) of the movie? The answer is: We get conversations, character scenes, scenes where our heroes just sit and talk or are standing/walking and discussing their thoughts, their worries and their intentions.

And considering that The Return of the King was practically a nonstop war movie: How can anyone say that the action was "over used" in the first Hobbit movie? "An Unexpected Journey" is actually a very quiet movie with very long scenes in the Shire and Rivendell, especially in the extended edition. It's a movie that heavily relies on atmosphere, plus the beauty and magic of Middle-Earth and Howard Shore's music. ... One of the characteristic things about The Lord of the Rings trilogy was the way it - with the help of Howard Shore's music - dwelled on the atmosphere, the various locations, the beautiful nature and the main characters. The mood and the peace in those long scenes was part of what made these films so unique. ... So why are some people suddenly complaining about it now, when




beautiful_night -> The Hobbit movies are true masterpieces (12/6/2014 2:38:28 PM)

Part 3

(continued)

... they are watching "An Unexpected Journey"? To me those quiet, atmospheric scenes are the very heart of the story.

Some people claim, the dangers that Bilbo and the dwarves survive, are too incredible (like when when they fall into the abyss). ... Well, in the movie "The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King" Gollum fell into a seemingly bottomless abyss, but he still survived. In the movie "The Two Towers" Aragorn fell from a high cliff down into a river, but he survived. In the same trilogy Legolas surfed up and down a big oliphant, and he surfed down some stairs. If you can accept that, you can also accept that the dwarves and Bilbo survive incredible dangers in the Hobbit movies ... unless you simply don't WANT to.

An Unexpected Journey" has the word 'classic" written all over it. It is filled with unforgettable scenes: Thorin realizing that Thranduil and his elves won't come to the Dwarves' aid - Gandalf's very first conversation with Bilbo - Bilbo changing his mind (about the job offer) in a completely wordless scene - Elrond reading the moon letters for Thorin and Gandalf - Bilbo enjoying his stay in Rivendell - Gandalf and Galadriel having a conversation ("Why the halfling?)" - the "Riddles in the Dark" scene - Bilbo sparing Gollum's life (a wonderful scene, that is beautifully acted by Martin Freeman) - The Eagles Rescue and Flight scene - the "I have never been so wrong in all my life." scene. The latter three scenes are some of the most emotional and moving of Peter Jackson's preliminary quintology.




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