RE: Favourite 250 Horrors (Full Version)

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rawlinson -> RE: Favourite 250 Horrors (5/10/2012 2:51:09 PM)

243. Lemora

[image]http://i90.photobucket.com/albums/k241/worldsgreatestsinner/Lemora-1.png[/image]

1973
Director: Richard Blackburn
Film

Atmospheric vampire drama that has that 'only in the 70s' feel to it. 14 year old Lila receives a letter from her estranged father, asking to see her before he dies. She runs away from the church that raised her to travel to the odd little town where her father resides. During the journey, her innocence is threatened by a variety of unsettling men. The town is haunted by vampires and Lila is rescued from them by Lemora, a mysterious woman who either wants to protect or corrupt her. With the dreamlike atmosphere and the overtones of paedophilia and lesbianism running through the film, Lemora actually feels closer in spirit to European horrors of the 70s than American ones and it'd be very easy to imagine Jean Rollin directing this. It's imaginative, decadent and brilliant, not to mention damn creepy.




rawlinson -> RE: Favourite 250 Horrors (5/10/2012 5:19:16 PM)

242. Merry May

[image]http://i90.photobucket.com/albums/k241/worldsgreatestsinner/ScaredStiff.jpg[/image]

by Ramsey Campbell
1987
Short Story

Not one of Campbell's best known stories, Merry May appeared in his collection of sex and horror stories, Scared Stiff. A music teacher who is bored of his job and frustrated with his longings for under-age girls, calls a number he sees advertised in a local paper promising Renewal of Life. The young girl he speaks to invites him to take part in the May Day celebrations in a small village nearby. Thinking he might be taking part in some of the more sexually charged rituals he's read about, he finds himself accepting the invitation. When he arrives he finds the village and their rituals darker than he was ever expecting. It's probably my love for Wicker Man-esque tales of forgotten communities that pushes this higher up my list, but it's also a genuinely upsetting story.




rawlinson -> RE: Favourite 250 Horrors (6/10/2012 3:23:13 PM)

241. Short Night of the Glass Dolls

[image]http://i1081.photobucket.com/albums/j344/empirehorrorlist/ShortNightoftheGlassDolls.jpg[/image]

1971
Director: Aldo Lado
Film

The film begins with a lifeless body being discovered in the bushes, somewhere in Prague. The body is collected and taken to the morgue, once in the ambulance we begin to hear the inner monologue of the 'corpse'. His name is Gregory Moore (Jean Sorel), he's a reporter and he's not actually dead, just trapped within a body so fully paralysed that he can't even open his lips to talk. Gregory takes the viewer through a series of flashbacks, involving a kidnapped girlfriend, a series of murders, and a strange cult, to show how he ended up this way. Gregory has to struggle to remember the full events that led to his paralysis if he has any hope of saving his own life.

Although considered a giallo, it has few of the grisly murders associated with the genre, instead placing emphasis on the slow-burning mystery and the surreal atmosphere. It's one of the very best of the genre, maybe because its strangeness creates such a unique personality for the film. The film has much to recommend it, there's some fine performances, especially from Ingrid Thulin, it's incredibly stylish, there's some tense direction, a strong mystery story, and some unexpected plot twists. It's also an incredibly haunting film, packed with strange imagery. Despite some excellent later work, this debut from Lado remains his finest film




rawlinson -> RE: Favourite 250 Horrors (8/10/2012 6:21:36 PM)

240. The Seafarer

[image]http://i90.photobucket.com/albums/k241/worldsgreatestsinner/TheSeafarer.jpg[/image]

by Conor McPherson
2006
Play

The Seafarer isn't as overtly supernatural as McPherson's earlier play, The Weir, but it definitely does enough to fit into the horror category. On Christmas Eve, two brothers, Richard and Sharky, are joined by some friends in their house in Dublin to play cards. It's a house of lost souls, with characters hiding from their secrets and their sins. Into this gathering comes Mr. Lockhart, a man with a secret of his own, and a history with Sharky. It's not exactly difficult to figure out who Lockhart really is and what he wants with Sharky, and Lockhart gets the best monologues in the play (as is only fitting) and it's in those monologues where the play tips over from black comedy to horror.




rawlinson -> RE: Favourite 250 Horrors (8/10/2012 8:30:55 PM)

239. Messiah of Evil

[image]http://i90.photobucket.com/albums/k241/worldsgreatestsinner/messiah.jpg[/image]

1973
Director: Willard Hyuck, Gloria Katz
Film

Arletty (Marianna Hill) returns to her hometown to find out what happened to her artist father. Her father has disappeared from his California beach house but all his belongings remain. While investigating his disappearance, she meets some hippies, led by the enigmatic Thom, and they come to stay at her father's house. They all find themselves involved with a bizarre religious cult revolving around a cannibal Satanist minister who raises the dead in his quest to claim the town.


Messiah Of Evil comes from an odd source, the same year that they scripted George Lucas's finest film, no-one expected them to turn out this atmospheric and eerie tale. The critics at the time weren't kind, I have to feel that this was partly down to the film not having the same warm-hearted vibe as American Graffiti. That's not to say the film isn't flawed, it was obviously made on a low budget, the narrative is a little jumbled, and there are technical errors that do restrain the film at time. But I always found the odd clumsy touches just adds to its charm. If charm is the right term to apply to such an unpleasant film.

The film obviously owes a debt to other classic horrors. Carnival Of Souls and Night Of The Living Dead are obvious influences, it would also work well as a companion piece to Let's Scare Jessica To Death. Both films feature leads who are artistic but damaged. Messiah would also make a fine double-bill with the later Italian horror, The House With The Laughing Windows. One of the biggest influences on the film is more literary, Messiah is one of the few Lovecraft influenced films to actually capture the feel of classic Lovecraft. The small, seemingly idyllic seaside town, decaying from the inside and the people turning to older, darker Gods is a recurring theme in Lovecraft, especially in his 'Shadow Over Innsmouth'.

The film can be slightly infuriating in how much it leaves ambiguous. Arletty is a good example of an unreliable narrator, how much of her voiceover narration actually happened? The characters are all torn apart by the madness infecting the town, is her narration merely lunacy? If not, how much can be trusted? There are also strong hints that Greer's Thom is actually the cannibalistic messiah.

The film looks beautiful, a tribute both to cinematographer Stephen Katz (whose c.v. doesn't seem to include anything else as impressive) and to talented art director Jack Fisk, who would work with Malick on Badlands the same year before becoming a regular name on both Malick and David Lynch movies. There are several impressive set pieces in the film, a zombie attack in a supermarket being a possible influence on Dawn Of The Dead. The highlight of the film though is a zombie attack in a cinema. A scene that makes impressive use of both silence and pacing as the cinema slowly fills up with the undead, with the victim only becoming gradually aware that she's no longer alone.

A strangely haunting movie, one that deserves rediscovery.




Gimli The Dwarf -> RE: Favourite 250 Horrors (8/10/2012 10:03:17 PM)

Waiting for something I know to come along

[image]http://imageshack.us/a/img833/8530/daffy.gif[/image]




rawlinson -> RE: Favourite 250 Horrors (10/10/2012 3:10:46 PM)

Maybe this next one?




rawlinson -> RE: Favourite 250 Horrors (10/10/2012 3:11:42 PM)

238. Escape into Night

[image]http://i90.photobucket.com/albums/k241/worldsgreatestsinner/EscapeintoNight.jpg[/image]

1972
T.V. Series

Catherine Storr's novel, Marianne Dreams has provided inspiration for both the criminally overlooked 80s horror, Paperhouse, and this excellent piece of telefantasy. A young girl, Marianne, is bedridden with a long-term illness. She begins getting jealous over the time her nurse spends with another patient, a young boy named Mark. Marianne begins drawing a strange house, surrounded by creepy stones, and finds she can dream herself into the house. She draws herself a friend, a young boy. When he appears in the house, she discovers he is the Mark that her nurse is treating. After a fight with Mark, Marianne decides to make him a prisoner of the house, turning the stones into guardians to make sure he can never leave. But this is no dream, and soon Marianne has to find a way to free him. Escape into Night is afflicted with one of the regular problems of children's television of this era, the children are very obviously stage school. But that aside, like so many 70s kids shows, it displays an intelligence that lots of today's adult television would kill for.




FritzlFan -> RE: Favourite 250 Horrors (10/10/2012 6:14:40 PM)

Not seen/read/listened to any of these bad boys yet.




evil bill -> RE: Favourite 250 Horrors (10/10/2012 8:11:07 PM)

quote:

ORIGINAL: rawlinson

239. Messiah of Evil

[image]http://i90.photobucket.com/albums/k241/worldsgreatestsinner/messiah.jpg[/image]

1973
Director: Willard Hyuck, Gloria Katz
Film

Arletty (Marianna Hill) returns to her hometown to find out what happened to her artist father. Her father has disappeared from his California beach house but all his belongings remain. While investigating his disappearance, she meets some hippies, led by the enigmatic Thom, and they come to stay at her father's house. They all find themselves involved with a bizarre religious cult revolving around a cannibal Satanist minister who raises the dead in his quest to claim the town.


Messiah Of Evil comes from an odd source, the same year that they scripted George Lucas's finest film, no-one expected them to turn out this atmospheric and eerie tale. The critics at the time weren't kind, I have to feel that this was partly down to the film not having the same warm-hearted vibe as American Graffiti. That's not to say the film isn't flawed, it was obviously made on a low budget, the narrative is a little jumbled, and there are technical errors that do restrain the film at time. But I always found the odd clumsy touches just adds to its charm. If charm is the right term to apply to such an unpleasant film.

The film obviously owes a debt to other classic horrors. Carnival Of Souls and Night Of The Living Dead are obvious influences, it would also work well as a companion piece to Let's Scare Jessica To Death. Both films feature leads who are artistic but damaged. Messiah would also make a fine double-bill with the later Italian horror, The House With The Laughing Windows. One of the biggest influences on the film is more literary, Messiah is one of the few Lovecraft influenced films to actually capture the feel of classic Lovecraft. The small, seemingly idyllic seaside town, decaying from the inside and the people turning to older, darker Gods is a recurring theme in Lovecraft, especially in his 'Shadow Over Innsmouth'.

The film can be slightly infuriating in how much it leaves ambiguous. Arletty is a good example of an unreliable narrator, how much of her voiceover narration actually happened? The characters are all torn apart by the madness infecting the town, is her narration merely lunacy? If not, how much can be trusted? There are also strong hints that Greer's Thom is actually the cannibalistic messiah.

The film looks beautiful, a tribute both to cinematographer Stephen Katz (whose c.v. doesn't seem to include anything else as impressive) and to talented art director Jack Fisk, who would work with Malick on Badlands the same year before becoming a regular name on both Malick and David Lynch movies. There are several impressive set pieces in the film, a zombie attack in a supermarket being a possible influence on Dawn Of The Dead. The highlight of the film though is a zombie attack in a cinema. A scene that makes impressive use of both silence and pacing as the cinema slowly fills up with the undead, with the victim only becoming gradually aware that she's no longer alone.

A strangely haunting movie, one that deserves rediscovery.


Loving this a complete guide to HORROR[:D],how you get the time to list somany films,books etc i don't know,and also the film polls[&:].Hope to see a few of the books i love on here,as i know i'll see plenty of ye old classic and cult horror like this little gem.[;)][:)]And a must see for any Lovecraft  fan as it is as you said heavly influenced by his writtings,and i'd forgot about the Supermarket scene,which was before Dawn Of the Dead,so maybe Romero got his idea from this and Argento Demons from the cinema scene.But for me this has to be one of the big influences on A Nightmare On Elm Street,with it's use of dream/nightmare scenes that meld with the realworld???




rawlinson -> RE: Favourite 250 Horrors (12/10/2012 1:54:19 PM)

Yeah, I can see what you mean about Nightmare. There was a really good interview with Craven where he was talking about the inspiration for Freddy, but I can't remember where I saw it now. Maybe in American Nightmare.




rawlinson -> RE: Favourite 250 Horrors (12/10/2012 1:59:46 PM)

237. Hammer House of Mystery and Suspense: In Possession

[image]http://i90.photobucket.com/albums/k241/worldsgreatestsinner/MysteryandSuspense.jpg[/image]

1984
T.V. Series Episode

When Hammer moved to television, the various series went through a gradual decline in quality. The most accomplished is their late 60s offering, Journey to the Unknown. The early 80s Hammer House of Horror had more hits than misses, but Hammer House of Mystery and Suspense is, in general, a disappointment. The ideas were often weak to begin with, and those that weren't are hurt by the excessive running time. What would have made a good 30, or even 50 minute episode is rendered unwatchable when padded out to 70 minutes. In Possession stands out from the crowd, not by being particularly original in its ideas, just by being actually scary. It suffers, like all the episodes, from the padding, there are various scenes that could have been tightened along the way, but the end result is still a genuinely haunting ghost story. It understands the pleasures of the slow burn in ghost stories, the accumulation of odd, unexplainable events that gradually build to something far more terrifying. A couple are due to move out of their flat, on their last night there they begin experiencing strange visions. They see the body of a murdered woman in their bathtub, and they soon find themselves sinking into another time period, where they helplessly watch the murder play out.




Gimli The Dwarf -> RE: Favourite 250 Horrors (12/10/2012 3:06:31 PM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: rawlinson

Maybe this next one?


Nope, but it looks to be on YT. I'll give it a go.




rawlinson -> RE: Favourite 250 Horrors (12/10/2012 3:17:03 PM)

No joy with In Possession either?




rawlinson -> RE: Favourite 250 Horrors (12/10/2012 3:26:23 PM)

236. Snow Cancellations

[image]http://i90.photobucket.com/albums/k241/worldsgreatestsinner/SnowCancellations.jpg[/image]

by Donald R. Burleson
1989
Short Story

Snow Cancellations isn't a particularly acclaimed story, and it's not one I discovered until fairly recently, buried in one of those Best New Horror collections, but it managed to slip under my skin and demand a place in this list. A blizzard hits a small American town forcing a series of school closures, announced as a series of snow cancellations over the local radio. With his father already at work, a young boy is left alone for the day when his school is closed but his mother is forced to still go to work. Seeking comfort from the storm, he phones his best friend and the two spend the morning talking and listening to the list of snow closures. But the storm is getting worse, and the radio begins to announce some very odd cancellations. It's the atmosphere of the story I love, the sense of isolation as the storm builds around the boys, and the feeling of helplessness when you know terrible things are happening but you don't have the power to stop them.




rawlinson -> RE: Favourite 250 Horrors (12/10/2012 3:39:03 PM)

235. Trilogy of Terror

[image]http://i1081.photobucket.com/albums/j344/empirehorrorlist/TrilogyofTerror2.jpg[/image]

Directed by Dan Curtis
1975
T.V. Film

Trilogy of Terror is one of the greatest television horror movies of all time, from the team of Dan Curtis and Richard Matheson, as well as one of the finest anthology horrors you could hope to see. Instead of being linked by a wraparound story, the three tales were linked by the performance of the same actress, Karen Black taking the lead in all three stories.

In the first story, Black stars as a teacher, Julie, who becomes the object of attention for one of her students. He seems to blackmail her into a sexually manipulative relationship, but is he really the one in control?

The second story is the tale of sisters Therese and Millicent (Black in both roles), Millicent is convinced that Therese is evil. The segment starts with Millicent's attempts to convince Therese's new boyfriend of her evil, claiming she had an incestuous relationship with their father and murdered their mother. When Therese discovers this, the two sisters go to war, culminating in voodoo rituals.

The final story is the most famous of the film, Black stars as Amelia, a young woman living alone who has just brought home a special doll - a Zuni hunting fetish doll named He Who Kills. It's a hideous little doll with razor sharp teeth and hunting spear. There's a legend attached to the doll that there's a hunter's spirit trapped inside it, only kept imprisoned by a gold chain around the body. Of course, the chain falls off. Amelia finds herself being hunted around her apartment by a tiny, but deadly (and apparently unstoppable), killer.

The film is a perfect vehicle for Black, the variety of characters allowing her to show great versatility. It's often claimed that the earlier stories are weak and the film is all about the last section, I don't buy it. I think they seem weaker, but only in comparison to the nail-biting 'Amelia'. But taken on their own merits, each segment is strong, the opener has a great sense of unease, the middle segment works because of Black's contrasting performances and the finale is simply incredible. It's one of the best horror films ever made, everyone should see it.




rawlinson -> RE: Favourite 250 Horrors (12/10/2012 5:00:09 PM)

234. Fear on Four

[image]http://i90.photobucket.com/albums/k241/worldsgreatestsinner/FearonFour.jpg[/image]

1988 - 1997
Radio Series

The concept of a horror host was nothing new by the late 80s, various horror anthology series, both television and radio, had been using them for as long as the medium existed. Not even the idea of the host being the mysterious Man in Black was new to Fear on Four. Valentine Dyall had been the original Man in Black, Edward de Souza just took over the mantle for this series. That's not to downplay his role at all, the great episodes are unimaginable without that strangely menacing voice introducing them. But what makes Fear on Four such a stand-out series is the quality of the adaptations, at least in the early years. From The Snowman Killing to William and Mary, The Beast with Five Fingers, By the River Fontainbleau, The Dead Drummer, The Judge's House and the greatest ever adaptation of Speciality of the House, Fear on Four produced some of radio's finest ever horror stories.




rawlinson -> RE: Favourite 250 Horrors (12/10/2012 5:15:26 PM)

233. Kolchak: the Night Stalker

[image]http://i90.photobucket.com/albums/k241/worldsgreatestsinner/Kolchak20poster202.jpg[/image]

1972 - 1975
T.V. Series

Not getting a full series, until 1974, Carl Kolchak started his television life in the Richard Matheson scripted t.v. movie, The Night Stalker. Kolchak was a journalist, fired from the big city and working for a paper in Vegas, who stumbled across a serial killer who just happened to be a vampire.

Kolchak was to return in a second t.v. special the next year, The Night Strangler. Finding himself fired from his Vegas job and relocating to Seattle, he still couldn't escape the supernatural. This time he came face to face with a one-hundred-year-old serial killer.

By the time he got a series he'd relocated again, this time to Chicago. But he still kept bumping into monsters. A different one every week from androids to zombies, taking in werewolves, witches and UFOs along the way. There's no denying that the show became formulaic after a while. Kolchak would discover a mysterious case, he'd tell everyone it was supernatural, no-one would believe him, and so on. But just because it was formulaic it doesn't stop it being a classic series. It's funny, spooky and always entertaining.




rawlinson -> RE: Favourite 250 Horrors (12/10/2012 8:23:24 PM)

232. Dark Forces

[image]http://i90.photobucket.com/albums/k241/worldsgreatestsinner/DarkForces.jpg[/image]

Edited by Kirby McCauley
1980
Short Story Collection

A landmark anthology collection, Dark Forces would be notable if only for being the first book to publish Stephen King's The Mist. But even beyond that claim to fame, Dark Forces is an exceptional collection, trying to cover as many different aspects of the horror tale as possible. Collecting work from masters like Dennis Etchison, Robert Aickman, Karl Edward Wagner, T.E.D. Klein, Ramsey Campbell, Robert Bloch, Ray Bradbury, Richard Matheson and Manly Wade Wellman (Among others) it reads like a who's who of some of the best and brightest the genre had to offer. Doesn't hurt that the stories are largely excellent.




rawlinson -> RE: Favourite 250 Horrors (12/10/2012 8:34:25 PM)

231. Apaches

[image]http://i90.photobucket.com/albums/k241/worldsgreatestsinner/Apaches-1.jpg[/image]

Director: John Mackenzie
1977
Short Film

The British government used to have a habit of trying to induce trauma in school children under the guise of protecting them. The Public Information Film (or pif) warned children of various dangers from the risk of electrocution if you play near a power station to the dark and disturbing Spirit of Dark and Lonely Water. Apaches didn't reach as many kids as a lot of these other films, it seems to have been shown only in rural areas, but even if you see the film as an adult, it's a brutally brilliant piece of film-making. Director John Mackenzie created some of the finest films of the 70s and 80s, from The Elephant's Graveyard to The Long Good Friday and Unman, Wittering and Zigo, so this wasn't the amateur production it might appear on first glance.

Apaches is genuinely surreal, combining a child-like view of westerns with life in rural Britain. The children play various games of cowboys and Indians (explaining the title) in the rural area where they live, displaying their ignorance of the dangers that surround them in every game. The film is narrated by the leader of the children and we cut between scenes where the adults prepare for a party while the children play. Apaches aims to warn children about the hidden dangers of farm life, but it's actually the cinematic equivalent of Gorey's The Gashlycrumb Tinies. We watch six small children getting picked off in sometimes horrific, sometimes hilarious ways. Apaches probably wasn't meant to be amusing, but how else can you react to the sight of someone drowning in slurry? The children are run over by a tractor, drink poison, get crushed by iron gates and various other disasters. Each fresh death is met with scenes of the children's teacher clearing out the child's belongings in the school-room. The final reveal is that the 'party' the adults have been preparing for is actually the funeral of one of the children.

Apaches may be cheap looking, but it captures that same air of rural grimness as films like Blood on Satan's Claw and if internet discussions are anything to go by, it appears to have caused deep scars in the people who did see this as a child. Aside from its pif roots, its brutal nature makes it a memorable and effective horror short.




Gimli The Dwarf -> RE: Favourite 250 Horrors (13/10/2012 5:58:41 AM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: rawlinson

No joy with In Possession either?


Nope, and none of those since either [:D] I really shoudl get the Kolchak Tv show as I love the films.




MovieAddict247 -> RE: Favourite 250 Horrors (13/10/2012 8:08:32 AM)

Apaches is really good.




rawlinson -> RE: Favourite 250 Horrors (13/10/2012 11:35:56 AM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: Gimli The Dwarf


quote:

ORIGINAL: rawlinson

No joy with In Possession either?


Nope, and none of those since either [:D] I really shoudl get the Kolchak Tv show as I love the films.



Yes, you should. Especially as there'd be no X-Files without it. But you really haven't watched Apaches?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P0GyRz_lOQA

Do it now in case it gets pulled.

quote:

Apaches is really good.


Listen to MovieAddict. She has the power of Myrna Loy on her side.




rawlinson -> RE: Favourite 250 Horrors (13/10/2012 12:12:48 PM)

230. Long Weekend

[image]http://i90.photobucket.com/albums/k241/worldsgreatestsinner/LongWeekend-1.jpg[/image]

Director: Colin Eggleston
1978
Film

Part of the wave of incredible independent cinema coming from Australia in the 70s, Long Weekend tells the story of a couple whose relationship has broken down. They decide to go for a camping trip to the beach together in an attempt to save their crumbling marriage but they find themselves hating each other even more. They treat nature with contempt, they destroy their environment and the environment is finally fighting back. The idea of animals striking back against humans was a common theme in the 70s but this isn't a typical cheesy animal attack horror, it has a thoughtful and meditative quality the others often miss. Long Weekend is ballsy, refusing to give us anything approaching a sympathetic character and willing to put horror audiences to the test with it's graphic depiction of love falling apart.




matty_b -> RE: Favourite 250 Horrors (13/10/2012 12:23:17 PM)

Just watched that the other week.

Good film and a tough watch.




rawlinson -> RE: Favourite 250 Horrors (13/10/2012 12:33:51 PM)

Australia made some amazing stuff in the 70s, didn't they? How could they have known it would all lead to Crocodile Dundee? [:D]




rawlinson -> RE: Favourite 250 Horrors (13/10/2012 2:35:08 PM)

229. All Heads Turn When the Hunt Goes By

[image]http://i90.photobucket.com/albums/k241/worldsgreatestsinner/AllHeads.jpg[/image]

by John Farris
1977
Novel

I have a thing for titles. A nicely evocative title can catch my eye and make me hunt down a particular book or film, even if I know very little about it. I first noticed this book when I read King's Danse Macabre, it took me several years to track down a copy, but it was worth the wait. I haven't been overly thrilled by Farris' other work, but AHTWTHGB has an unsettling atmosphere nearly unrivalled in horror fiction. It plays a bit like an update of all those H. Rider Haggard-esque adventure tales, but with a far nastier edge given to it by its southern gothic backdrop. The novel opens with a wedding that becomes a bloody massacre when the groom starts executing his family members. From there, Farris tackles the legacy of the slave trade and of ancient religious beliefs. A thrilling, surprising novel, with several scenes that are screaming out to be filmed.




rawlinson -> RE: Favourite 250 Horrors (13/10/2012 3:01:21 PM)

228. Thriller: A Killer in Every Corner

[image]http://i1081.photobucket.com/albums/j344/empirehorrorlist/AKillerinEveryCorner.jpg[/image]

1974
T.V. Series Episode

Patrick Magee plays a renowned psychologist, Professor Carnaby, who invites some psychology students to his secluded house for the weekend. Carnaby has two servants, Boz and George. The three students are unaware that both men are violent killers being kept calm by Carnaby's mind-control experiments. Carnaby has crossed that fine line that divides brilliant scientist and absolute madman and he has invited the students to his home to see if his treatment has worked - they're his guinea pigs, locked in a secluded mansion with a couple of madmen. Magee is incredible as always as the face of power corrupted by insanity and Max Wall is surprisingly creepy as one of the madmen. The best episode of Clemens' superb anthology series.




Deviation -> RE: Favourite 250 Horrors (13/10/2012 3:06:44 PM)

quote:

ORIGINAL: rawlinson

Australia made some amazing stuff in the 70s, didn't they? How could they have known it would all lead to Crocodile Dundee? [:D]


You know what amazes me about Australian filmmaking? It's the only sort of filmmaking that has made me apathetic towards the country they portray one way or another. Mary and Max, Snowtown and Animal Kingdom didn't help.

Plus, surely Baz Luhrman is both a bigger crime and oddity. At least Crocodile Dundee seemed like Australia.




rawlinson -> RE: Favourite 250 Horrors (13/10/2012 3:08:04 PM)

That's why you should watch the Barry McKenzie films, you'll be on the next flight there.




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