Films Impossible to Remake (Full Version)

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dicky_monster -> Films Impossible to Remake (15/8/2012 11:58:58 AM)

I couldn't find a thread on this subject, so I thought I'd start one.

Simply put - which films would Hollywood never remake?

I'm thinking in terms of films which had a large cultural impact and are popular, but are unique and one-of-a-kind to the point that Hollywood are unlikely (nothing is sacred I guess!) to try and remake them.

To get the ball rolling (I'm avoiding films that have had (or have planned) belated sequels i.e. Indiana Jones, Blade Runner etc):

E.T. - hugely successful and popular film, I can't imagine it being re-made though.
Back to the Future - I get the feeling Hollywood would like to do something with this, but the orignals are so ingrained in pop culture, it would prove problematic.




st3veebee -> RE: Films Impossible to Remake (15/8/2012 12:01:50 PM)

Honestly...I wouldn't put anything past Hollywood when it comes to remakes.




AxlReznor -> RE: Films Impossible to Remake (15/8/2012 12:02:59 PM)

I think Hollywood has proven that there is no such thing as a film that's impossible to remake. [;)]
Whether they can do it well is another matter... but there is nothing sacred.




Rhubarb -> RE: Films Impossible to Remake (15/8/2012 12:04:20 PM)

They'll remake anything if they think there is a dollar in it, effectively (and why not). I think with those 80s movies where cast members or crew are still alive for the most part they'd largely like to do sequels and stuff so as to not alienate the original fanbase too much, but a point will come where Back to The Future is remakable. Even prestige, older movies could get done if they can find a way to frame it - with Psycho for example where is was concieved as a sort of tribute to the original.




DancingClown -> RE: Films Impossible to Remake (15/8/2012 12:04:43 PM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: dicky_monster

Back to the Future - I get the feeling Hollywood would like to do something with this, but the orignals are so ingrained in pop culture, it would prove problematic.



I hope you're right about this. It might be quite difficult to centre a remake around two decades that are perceived as being so culturally different - especially in the US - as the 80s and 50s. If a teenager now went back to 1982 would the culture shock be as severe?

Wizard of Oz? Citizen Kane? Godfather?

Of course, we all know that in Hollywood nothing is really sacred so who knows?




Dannybohy -> RE: Films Impossible to Remake (15/8/2012 12:07:50 PM)

Holy fuck! if they remake Bladerunner I will get a plane flight to the studio and shit in their Mailbox!! . I dont think anyone would be stupid enough to remake Godfather, but then they did make Godfather3....




AxlReznor -> RE: Films Impossible to Remake (15/8/2012 12:11:45 PM)

quote:

ORIGINAL: Dannybohy

Holy fuck! if they remake Bladerunner I will get a plane flight to the studio and shit in their Mailbox!! . I dont think anyone would be stupid enough to remake Godfather, but then they did make Godfather3....


Ridley Scott's on for a Blade Runner project. It's not being called a remake or a sequel. I'm thinking it's gonna be in the same vain as Prometheus. A different story in the same universe.




Rgirvan44 -> RE: Films Impossible to Remake (15/8/2012 12:15:08 PM)

Wizard of Oz has been remade quite a few times it must be said.




Rhubarb -> RE: Films Impossible to Remake (15/8/2012 12:15:48 PM)

quote:

ORIGINAL: DancingClown

Wizard of Oz? Citizen Kane? Godfather?




Wizard of Oz is not the first adaptation of that book, so I don't see why not. Kane, I think the only reason they wouldn't would be that the kind of audience that would be targeted by a Citizen Kane remake would be iffy about the whole project and a mainstream audience wouldn't be bothered, The Godfather I could imagine it happening, but it is still the kind of film a young audience probably would watch, so there isn't a burning desire to do it (yet).




AxlReznor -> RE: Films Impossible to Remake (15/8/2012 12:17:08 PM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: Rgirvan44

Wizard of Oz has been remade quite a few times it must be said.


Yup. The famous version was the fourth adapatation.




DancingClown -> RE: Films Impossible to Remake (15/8/2012 12:26:24 PM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: Rgirvan44

Wizard of Oz has been remade quite a few times it must be said.


Oh right, yeah, The Wiz being one of them I guess.

And yet somehow the Judy Garland classic is the one that everyone remembers and still treasures. Funny dat.




AxlReznor -> RE: Films Impossible to Remake (15/8/2012 12:33:16 PM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: DancingClown


quote:

ORIGINAL: Rgirvan44

Wizard of Oz has been remade quite a few times it must be said.


Oh right, yeah, The Wiz being one of them I guess.

And yet somehow the Judy Garland classic is the one that everyone remembers and still treasures. Funny dat.


Proof that it's possible for a remake to be so good that it eclipses the reputation of the originals if you ask me. [;)]




dicky_monster -> RE: Films Impossible to Remake (15/8/2012 12:36:16 PM)

Yeah that's a good point about the cultural difference between decades for Back to the Future.

It does seem like nothing is sacred these days. Maybe I should re-phrase to 'the films I hope Hollywood doesn't try to remake'!

Groundhog Day being another one.




UTB -> RE: Films Impossible to Remake (15/8/2012 12:42:27 PM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: DancingClown

I hope you're right about this. It might be quite difficult to centre a remake around two decades that are perceived as being so culturally different - especially in the US - as the 80s and 50s. If a teenager now went back to 1982 would the culture shock be as severe?




OMG! Marty would be disappearing from his photo of himself holding his iPhone in the bathroom!




homersimpson_esq -> RE: Films Impossible to Remake (15/8/2012 12:44:24 PM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: dicky_monster
Maybe I should re-phrase to 'the films I hope Hollywood doesn't try to remake'!




Any film.

I'd rather see an original idea any day of the week over a remake.




DancingClown -> RE: Films Impossible to Remake (15/8/2012 12:45:20 PM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: AxlReznor


quote:

ORIGINAL: DancingClown


quote:

ORIGINAL: Rgirvan44

Wizard of Oz has been remade quite a few times it must be said.


Oh right, yeah, The Wiz being one of them I guess.

And yet somehow the Judy Garland classic is the one that everyone remembers and still treasures. Funny dat.


Proof that it's possible for a remake to be so good that it eclipses the reputation of the originals if you ask me. [;)]


[:D]

John Carpenter's THE THING!!

More faithful to the source of the novel, of course, than the Hawks movie. And more sensational. Then again the Total Recall remake was supposed to be a more 'faithful' adaptation of the original story. How's that doing?




DancingClown -> RE: Films Impossible to Remake (15/8/2012 12:46:50 PM)

quote:

ORIGINAL: homersimpson_esq


quote:

ORIGINAL: dicky_monster
Maybe I should re-phrase to 'the films I hope Hollywood doesn't try to remake'!




Any film.

I'd rather see an original idea any day of the week over a remake.


What if the original source material is literary? For instance I would love to see an adaptation of The Birds that was actually set in Cornwall.




homersimpson_esq -> RE: Films Impossible to Remake (15/8/2012 1:09:40 PM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: DancingClown

quote:

ORIGINAL: homersimpson_esq


quote:

ORIGINAL: dicky_monster
Maybe I should re-phrase to 'the films I hope Hollywood doesn't try to remake'!




Any film.

I'd rather see an original idea any day of the week over a remake.


What if the original source material is literary? For instance I would love to see an adaptation of The Birds that was actually set in Cornwall.


That's less a remake, more a secondary adaptation, so I'm fine with that. [:D]




jobloffski -> RE: Films Impossible to Remake (15/8/2012 1:13:09 PM)

quote:

ORIGINAL: Rhubarb

quote:

ORIGINAL: DancingClown

Wizard of Oz? Citizen Kane? Godfather?




Wizard of Oz is not the first adaptation of that book, so I don't see why not. Kane, I think the only reason they wouldn't would be that the kind of audience that would be targeted by a Citizen Kane remake would be iffy about the whole project and a mainstream audience wouldn't be bothered, The Godfather I could imagine it happening, but it is still the kind of film a young audience probably would watch, so there isn't a burning desire to do it (yet).


Okay, I'll pitch a Kane remake:

The film was more or less a direct attack on William Randolph Hearst, and he was not pleased with it. The Character of Kane, someone who ended up via ego burning his bridges was rather closely analogous to that of Orson Welles too so...

Make a film that charts Welles having a go at Hearst via making Kane, and Hearsts response to the film, during it's production etc.

Create a new spin on the narrative approach of Kane by presenting Hearst's Tale, Welles' tale and sequences from Kane, and the overall effect being to create a character study of both Hearst and Welles and where the lines between them blurs. Two epic egos with aspects of Kane in them, with their actions blurring into and out of sequences of Kane.

So you tell the story of the fictional Kane by looking at the behaviour/egos/tantrums of the two real men and blur the whole thing together into a single narrative that tells the tale of ambition, rise and fall and ultimately isolation of the two real men and Kane, all together with a dreamlike flow of life inspiring art, art inspiring life, and if any of this makes any sense to readers at all, the narrative style/ambitious storytelling/visual styles would (getting cheesy) make it the Citizen Kane of potential Citizen Kane projects.

To simplify the suggestion, basically a serious take on the Ed Wood approach, where reality and the character of the films and the making of THE film all converge, driven by the developing of the hatred between Hearst and Welles, highlighting how similar they were in terms of using people and enjoying being powerful men, and how that can burn away the soul. Art versus commerce as one of the themes the main characters embody, presented in an artistically commercial way that really, really, really, gets into how layered and dreamlike narrative cinema has the potential to be.

And to get really, really, commercially sensible about the whole thing, hand the project to Christopher Nolan, who like Orson Welles clearly loves (and may be better able to handle without turning into a bit of a monster) artistic freedom/being handed the keys to the toyshop (as Welles put it when in a position to experiment as a filmmaker when making Kane), while also having some skill in blurring perceptions and creating iconic symbolism in filmmaking.

Or sum shit like dat[;)]




Rhubarb -> RE: Films Impossible to Remake (15/8/2012 1:36:57 PM)

Just make it about Murdoch instead.




chris kilby -> RE: Films Impossible to Remake (15/8/2012 1:41:04 PM)

A Matter of Life and Death. So of its time in every sense and truly unique. There have been rumours of proposed remakes over the years but thankfully they've never come to anything.

A remake of Performance starring Danny Dire [sic - please don't stab in the eye or anything, Mr Dire] and Russell Brand, directed by Nick Love would really be something - a car crash.

And I suppose you'd need King Kong's balls to remake Citizen Kane...




Rebel scum -> RE: Films Impossible to Remake (15/8/2012 1:42:24 PM)

Those are good ideas, but if it was ever actually remake by today's standards they'll keep the exact same story structure with some notable exceptions. For instance, they'd change it to Citizen Krane and Orson Welles will be replaced by a hip, streetwise crane voiced by Seth McFarlane who goes on a series of crazy adventures in the newspaper industry. Also, there'll be a new climax involving Rosebud turning out to be a sinister terrorist plot which Citizen Krane thwarts at the last second.

And it'll be directed by Michael Bay.




chris kilby -> RE: Films Impossible to Remake (15/8/2012 1:49:07 PM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: AxlReznor


quote:

ORIGINAL: DancingClown


quote:

ORIGINAL: Rgirvan44

Wizard of Oz has been remade quite a few times it must be said.


Oh right, yeah, The Wiz being one of them I guess.

And yet somehow the Judy Garland classic is the one that everyone remembers and still treasures. Funny dat.


Proof that it's possible for a remake to be so good that it eclipses the reputation of the originals if you ask me. [;)]


Very true. wasn't The Maltese Falcon the second or third version of that story? And what about iconic characters who keep coming back to reflect the times they are (re-)made - Robin Hood, Dracula, Sherlock Holmes? 1938's The Adventures of Robin Hood was clearly "about" the Nazis. Bram Stoker's Dracula positively dripped with thinly-veiled AIDS allusions (syphilis was the AIDS of the 19th century). And Steven Moffat's modern day Sherlock is widely regarded as among the best Conan Doyle adaptations.

Then there's the small matter of The Dark Knight Trilogy and 9/11, The War on Terror and The Credit Crunch/Occupy...




chris kilby -> RE: Films Impossible to Remake (15/8/2012 1:50:59 PM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: jobloffski

quote:

ORIGINAL: Rhubarb

quote:

ORIGINAL: DancingClown

Wizard of Oz? Citizen Kane? Godfather?




Wizard of Oz is not the first adaptation of that book, so I don't see why not. Kane, I think the only reason they wouldn't would be that the kind of audience that would be targeted by a Citizen Kane remake would be iffy about the whole project and a mainstream audience wouldn't be bothered, The Godfather I could imagine it happening, but it is still the kind of film a young audience probably would watch, so there isn't a burning desire to do it (yet).


Okay, I'll pitch a Kane remake:

The film was more or less a direct attack on William Randolph Hearst, and he was not pleased with it. The Character of Kane, someone who ended up via ego burning his bridges was rather closely analogous to that of Orson Welles too so...

Make a film that charts Welles having a go at Hearst via making Kane, and Hearsts response to the film, during it's production etc.

Create a new spin on the narrative approach of Kane by presenting Hearst's Tale, Welles' tale and sequences from Kane, and the overall effect being to create a character study of both Hearst and Welles and where the lines between them blurs. Two epic egos with aspects of Kane in them, with their actions blurring into and out of sequences of Kane.

So you tell the story of the fictional Kane by looking at the behaviour/egos/tantrums of the two real men and blur the whole thing together into a single narrative that tells the tale of ambition, rise and fall and ultimately isolation of the two real men and Kane, all together with a dreamlike flow of life inspiring art, art inspiring life, and if any of this makes any sense to readers at all, the narrative style/ambitious storytelling/visual styles would (getting cheesy) make it the Citizen Kane of potential Citizen Kane projects.

To simplify the suggestion, basically a serious take on the Ed Wood approach, where reality and the character of the films and the making of THE film all converge, driven by the developing of the hatred between Hearst and Welles, highlighting how similar they were in terms of using people and enjoying being powerful men, and how that can burn away the soul. Art versus commerce as one of the themes the main characters embody, presented in an artistically commercial way that really, really, really, gets into how layered and dreamlike narrative cinema has the potential to be.

And to get really, really, commercially sensible about the whole thing, hand the project to Christopher Nolan, who like Orson Welles clearly loves (and may be better able to handle without turning into a bit of a monster) artistic freedom/being handed the keys to the toyshop (as Welles put it when in a position to experiment as a filmmaker when making Kane), while also having some skill in blurring perceptions and creating iconic symbolism in filmmaking.

Or sum shit like dat[;)]



Ballsy.

(Speaking of which, isn't this what Paul Thomas Anderson is rumoured to have done with L. Ron Hubbard in The Master...?)




chris kilby -> RE: Films Impossible to Remake (15/8/2012 1:53:22 PM)

I've got a pitch fer yez:

Citizen Bane - "Rozekdubtzz..."




chris kilby -> RE: Films Impossible to Remake (15/8/2012 1:54:25 PM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: Rhubarb

Just make it about Murdoch instead.


Shhh...

(Is there a lawyer in the house?)




chris kilby -> RE: Films Impossible to Remake (15/8/2012 1:56:05 PM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: DancingClown


quote:

ORIGINAL: AxlReznor


quote:

ORIGINAL: DancingClown


quote:

ORIGINAL: Rgirvan44

Wizard of Oz has been remade quite a few times it must be said.


Oh right, yeah, The Wiz being one of them I guess.

And yet somehow the Judy Garland classic is the one that everyone remembers and still treasures. Funny dat.


Proof that it's possible for a remake to be so good that it eclipses the reputation of the originals if you ask me. [;)]


[:D]

John Carpenter's THE THING!!

More faithful to the source of the novel, of course, than the Hawks movie. And more sensational. Then again the Total Recall remake was supposed to be a more 'faithful' adaptation of the original story. How's that doing?


I dunno. Depends on whether there are any talking space mice in it this time. Seriously...




jobloffski -> RE: Films Impossible to Remake (15/8/2012 2:09:50 PM)

quote:

ORIGINAL: Rhubarb

Just make it about Murdoch instead.



Via the power of implication that's what it would bring to mind anyway. And you can be more scathingly accusatory in implications than you can be in direct accusations, because you can use 'its only a story' as a defence. The character type is timeless. Indeed, human nature is full of hubris and spite if left unfettered. You make a film set in a different period you make a film that cannot date and can get under the skin of the viewer by asking 'are you this petty and vengeful too, in your dealings with other people?'

A film that makes a viewer ask questions about their own nature is a better film. And you can eviscerate current megalomaniacs through the depictions of former ones much more effectively than simply making Murdoch: The Cunt or whatever the approach of such a project would be.

You wanna make a film inspired by what many feel is one of the best examples of the art form, ever, then you have to aim pretty high in what you set out to do, and be very judicious with what can be achieved/allowed on screen compared with the time in which the original was made. The visuals and transitions created for Kane are pretty basic nowadays, so you have to get more ambitious in the reason for the existence of the film. Murdoch will die, and a film about him has less capacity for timelessness/art/legend.




Rhubarb -> RE: Films Impossible to Remake (15/8/2012 2:14:36 PM)

Obviously yeah.

But equally you would get the same from just rewatching Citizen Kane this evening.




fuzzy -> RE: Films Impossible to Remake (15/8/2012 2:44:43 PM)

I'm not to sure who says what can and can't be remade - is it the studios or the creator of the characters? i.e. would Spielberg have overiding say on the use of ET - or Universal? Same goes for Indy/Star Wars with George Lucas. Then what happens when those guys are no longer with us?




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