RE: Literature Hall of Fame One: Round One (Full Version)

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[Poll]

Literature Hall of Fame One: Round One


All Quiet on the Western Front (1929; Erich Maria Remarque)
  16% (2)
The Crucible (1952; Arthur Miller)
  33% (4)
Dubliners (1914; James Joyce)
  8% (1)
The Island of Dr. Moreau (1896; H.G. Wells)
  16% (2)
Ubik (1969; Philip K. Dick)
  16% (2)
The Weir (1997; Conor McPherson)
  8% (1)


Total Votes : 12
(last vote on : 10/10/2012 10:06:01 PM)
(Poll will run till: -- )


Message


Rebel scum -> RE: Literature Hall of Fame One: Round One (12/3/2012 2:34:48 PM)

Blitzed through a couple in order to avoid an essay:
The Crucible-Absolutely fantastic, maybe my new favourite play. The only problem I had was that I'd already seen a scene performed beforehand, and the guy playing the Judge, who was a friend of mine, is a massive ham, so I read every line the judge has in an insanely OTT fashion. [:D]

Doctor Moreau-Obviously it's a masterpiece.

The Weir-The stories told were well done and creepy, and Jack's final story was very effective, but sometimes the bits in between dragged. I also have no idea what Brendan and Jim's characters are, they seemed like more sketches compared to the well-developed other three. I still enjoyed it.




rawlinson -> RE: Literature Hall of Fame One: Round One (12/3/2012 2:51:13 PM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: Rebel scum

The Weir-The stories told were well done and creepy, and Jack's final story was very effective, but sometimes the bits in between dragged. I also have no idea what Brendan and Jim's characters are, they seemed like more sketches compared to the well-developed other three. I still enjoyed it.


The Weir - Spoilers

Well if you go with two of the key themes of The Weir being loneliness and repression, then Jim's story speaks volumes. Especially for a man who lived all his life with mother. Brendan's fear of committing to anything, and his loneliness, is sketched out through smaller details (unwilling to sell the top field, his admission of just how lonely he gets when the Germans are around, and how lonelier he'll be when they go). And I think it's playing on old ideas by having the barman being the one listening to the tales




Rebel scum -> RE: Literature Hall of Fame One: Round One (12/3/2012 3:00:46 PM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: rawlinson


quote:

ORIGINAL: Rebel scum

The Weir-The stories told were well done and creepy, and Jack's final story was very effective, but sometimes the bits in between dragged. I also have no idea what Brendan and Jim's characters are, they seemed like more sketches compared to the well-developed other three. I still enjoyed it.


The Weir - Spoilers

Well if you go with two of the key themes of The Weir being loneliness and repression, then Jim's story speaks volumes. Especially for a man who lived all his life with mother. Brendan's fear of committing to anything, and his loneliness, is sketched out through smaller details (unwilling to sell the top field, his admission of just how lonely he gets when the Germans are around, and how lonelier he'll be when they go). And I think it's playing on old ideas by having the barman being the one listening to the tales



More spoilers

I wondered why he didn't get a story, and that does make sense, but it's a shame that he doesn't get a moment in the spotlight. Jim's story didn't resonate for me on that level, though I did see that he was obviously concerned about mortality that wasn't really reflected in the story he told. Brendan's admission of loneliness seemed more to me as trying to guilt them into turning up more often, especially since he'd been a surly SOB all evening (except to Valerie).

As with all plays, it would probably click more if I'd seen it live. And I would like to, it's not a bad play.




rawlinson -> RE: Literature Hall of Fame One: Round One (12/3/2012 3:21:39 PM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: Rebel scum


quote:

ORIGINAL: rawlinson


quote:

ORIGINAL: Rebel scum

The Weir-The stories told were well done and creepy, and Jack's final story was very effective, but sometimes the bits in between dragged. I also have no idea what Brendan and Jim's characters are, they seemed like more sketches compared to the well-developed other three. I still enjoyed it.


The Weir - Spoilers

Well if you go with two of the key themes of The Weir being loneliness and repression, then Jim's story speaks volumes. Especially for a man who lived all his life with mother. Brendan's fear of committing to anything, and his loneliness, is sketched out through smaller details (unwilling to sell the top field, his admission of just how lonely he gets when the Germans are around, and how lonelier he'll be when they go). And I think it's playing on old ideas by having the barman being the one listening to the tales



More spoilers

I wondered why he didn't get a story, and that does make sense, but it's a shame that he doesn't get a moment in the spotlight. Jim's story didn't resonate for me on that level, though I did see that he was obviously concerned about mortality that wasn't really reflected in the story he told. Brendan's admission of loneliness seemed more to me as trying to guilt them into turning up more often, especially since he'd been a surly SOB all evening (except to Valerie).

As with all plays, it would probably click more if I'd seen it live. And I would like to, it's not a bad play.



More spoilers for The Weir

Well, I'd meant more the levels of sexual repression you can see in Jim's story. Did you think Brendan was surly? I took it more as banter, especially with Jack and Jim. Finbar was the only one I saw him as taking against, but all the men had various issues with Finbar. There's a very good radio production available with the original cast, I think once you hear the way the characters interact (Especially Jack, Brendan and Jim) the friendship is far more obvious.




Rebel scum -> RE: Literature Hall of Fame One: Round One (12/3/2012 3:55:47 PM)

I saw it start as banter, but once everyone started bickering I thought he was getting pissed off and left in a bad mood, though obviously that's just my interpretation of the text. I may have to seek out the radio adaptation.




rawlinson -> RE: Literature Hall of Fame One: Round One (12/3/2012 4:08:59 PM)

Even more spoiler for The Weir

You mean the bit right at the end where he's talking about being left alone picking his hole? Nah, definitely banter between old friends, but showing more of his underlying loneliness. Although it is much more obvious when you hear it played.




MovieAddict247 -> RE: Literature Hall of Fame One: Round One (12/3/2012 8:57:33 PM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: Rebel scum

Blitzed through a couple in order to avoid an essay:
The Crucible-Absolutely fantastic, maybe my new favourite play. The only problem I had was that I'd already seen a scene performed beforehand, and the guy playing the Judge, who was a friend of mine, is a massive ham, so I read every line the judge has in an insanely OTT fashion. [:D]



I love The Crucible - I gave it a re-read the other night, and got so into it again. It's so engrossing and well-written. If this wins, I won't have any complaints at all.



I think I'll pick up All Quiet and Doctor Moreau again in the next two weeks, then get started on the three I haven't read once the holidays properly start.




impqueen -> RE: Literature Hall of Fame One: Round One (13/3/2012 8:43:47 AM)

Yep Ubik remains amazing and horrible and brilliant.




impqueen -> RE: Literature Hall of Fame One: Round One (18/3/2012 12:26:14 PM)

I read The Crucible again and yeah itís brilliant but much like my previous encounter I simply donít love it.




elab49 -> RE: Literature Hall of Fame One: Round One (18/3/2012 12:33:34 PM)

I'm not a major fan of just reading plays - so much is in the idea for staging that just reading the odd direction doesn't really work for me. It's written with a thought for performance I think. Just reading The Weir would have placed it in one placing for me - reading it along with the broadcast copy I have? Vastly different. It's the same way I got through Faust last year as well - so different reading it with a related production to the copy being read. 




impqueen -> RE: Literature Hall of Fame One: Round One (18/3/2012 12:43:14 PM)

I agree that reading a play along with a broadcast is vastly different and  just reading stage directions isnít that much fun but Iím not too bothered by it, I read Shaw last year and I still thought he was fantastic.  However in the case of Miller I only really love All My Sons, though maybe I should track down a copy of The Crucible and read along with it.  




Rebenectomy -> RE: Literature Hall of Fame One: Round One (21/3/2012 9:42:10 PM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: MovieAddict247

I've never read any Joyce, so I'm a little apprehensive about Dubliners. Should I be concerned?



Bit late to the party here, forgot to check up on this thread. I think Dubliners is easily Joyce's most accessible work. I chose it, along with Portrait and Ulysses for my A level English course work; 10,000 words on something along the lines of 'Balancing romance and realism', and loved every minute of it. Being a short story collection as well, I think you can pace yourself better knowing that conclusions/endings are drawn in parts.

I've still yet to read Finnegan's Wake though, just never had the time or inclination.




Rinc -> RE: Literature Hall of Fame One: Round One (22/3/2012 7:29:06 PM)

Finished Dubliners today and thought it was really good. Not a patch on my entry [;)] but definitely worth a re-read.

Has anyone got any of the other books and would be able to send them to me? I'll pay for postage. [:)]




Rebel scum -> RE: Literature Hall of Fame One: Round One (22/3/2012 9:10:46 PM)

I've found All Quiet online, if you're not adverse to that kind of thing. I'm not sure about the rules on posting links, so PM me if you'd like it.

Also, if you have access to University libraries they'll probably have the rest (It's what I've been using).




Rebel scum -> RE: Literature Hall of Fame One: Round One (22/3/2012 9:22:46 PM)

Just finished Ubik, it's brilliant and wonderfully twisty-turny. Just got All Quiet left now.




impqueen -> RE: Literature Hall of Fame One: Round One (22/3/2012 10:03:31 PM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: Rebel scum

Just finished Ubik, it's brilliant and wonderfully twisty-turny. Just got All Quiet left now.


Cool, cool. [:)]




Rebel scum -> RE: Literature Hall of Fame One: Round One (29/3/2012 2:58:15 PM)

All Quiet is just as great as I remember it, one of the most uncompromising portrayals of war in any medium.

This has been a great round, not a dud in the mix. Just to check in terms of votes, are we going to use the same points system the 2nd round in the film HoF uses?




MovieAddict247 -> RE: Literature Hall of Fame One: Round One (30/3/2012 3:33:57 PM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: Rebel scum

All Quiet is just as great as I remember it, one of the most uncompromising portrayals of war in any medium.



[sm=happy34.gif]


When does this round finish? I've still got three to read, which I'll do next week on holiday.




Rebel scum -> RE: Literature Hall of Fame One: Round One (30/3/2012 3:55:23 PM)

It started on the 10th, and is a three-month round, so 10th June. You've got plenty of time!




rawlinson -> RE: Literature Hall of Fame One: Round One (30/3/2012 4:07:00 PM)

Yeah, plenty of time yet. If everyone finishes early then there'd be no problem ending the first round earlier, but nobody needs to rush to that either.




MovieAddict247 -> RE: Literature Hall of Fame One: Round One (30/3/2012 4:09:42 PM)

Excellent.




MovieAddict247 -> RE: Literature Hall of Fame One: Round One (6/4/2012 6:49:22 PM)

I really, really enjoyed The Weir - I'd love to see it performed.




elab49 -> RE: Literature Hall of Fame One: Round One (6/4/2012 7:20:38 PM)

I've sent you a PM [:)]




elab49 -> RE: Literature Hall of Fame One: Round One (6/4/2012 7:27:28 PM)

Also, just about to crack open Ubik again (I got slightly sidetracked in my reading by picking up Flow My Tears first). 




MovieAddict247 -> RE: Literature Hall of Fame One: Round One (6/4/2012 7:55:50 PM)

Got and replied [:)]




Rinc -> RE: Literature Hall of Fame One: Round One (7/4/2012 11:30:42 AM)

I'm currently reading Ubik and it's excellent so far.




impqueen -> RE: Literature Hall of Fame One: Round One (10/4/2012 6:28:14 PM)

The Island of Dr. Moreau
Fab revisit, thoroughly enjoyed it as I knew I would but perhaps even a little bit more.

The Weir
I read it in a pub and I thought it was beautiful. A little sad but not in a massively depressing woe is me way more in that Ďbuggerí missed opportunity way which is probably more painful than any of us realise. I Ďlikedí the individual stories too they had a gentle creepiness to them which usually appeals to my sensibilities and did so here, the final story delivered a bit of a hammer blow though.

Overall I think itís been a pretty brilliant first round. [:)]




rawlinson -> RE: Literature Hall of Fame One: Round One (10/4/2012 6:35:27 PM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: impqueen


The Weir
I read it in a pub and I thought it was beautiful.


How fitting. [:D]




impqueen -> RE: Literature Hall of Fame One: Round One (10/4/2012 6:39:22 PM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: rawlinson


quote:

ORIGINAL: impqueen


The Weir
I read it in a pub and I thought it was beautiful.


How fitting. [:D]




I thought so, I didn't have a Guinness though.




rawlinson -> RE: Literature Hall of Fame One: Round One (10/4/2012 6:40:38 PM)

Was the tap fucked?




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