RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films (Full Version)

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Gimli The Dwarf -> RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films (13/3/2012 1:28:45 AM)

Roger Rabbit is just brilliant. Every time I see it I seem to find a new animated cameo I didn't notice before. Roger himself is a fantastic creation.





chambanzi -> RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films (13/3/2012 9:03:28 AM)

Yeah Roger is like a cross between loads of different characters.
And the cameos are insane, you see a lot at the end actually where they all get saved, saw Pinocchio in there.




garvielloken -> RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films (14/3/2012 12:09:44 PM)

Roger Rabbit is awesome. Judge Doom used to really freak me out as a kid. It also makes you realise that Zemeckis hasn't done anything near as good as Rabbit in years.




chambanzi -> RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films (14/3/2012 10:59:28 PM)

Yeah Rabbit is his best. Not a fan of Forrest Gump, it's like a sappy, holier than thou rip off of Being There. And Cast Away was okay but the whole 'girlfriend moving on' stuff was reminiscent of Cronenberg's The Dead Zone which was a better film.




chambanzi -> RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films (16/3/2012 10:19:42 PM)

86. Winchester '73 (1950)

Director: Anthony Mann

[image]http://www.cineweekly.com/images/movie-winchester-73-01.jpg[/image]

A film that I found on impqueen’s list a few months back when I was compiling my list and decided to watch and, being a big fan of the western genre, ended up loving so much so that it has earned its place on my list as the most recent addition. So first and foremost big shout out to impqueen [:)]

The Review

From the excellent shooting competition to the dramatic conclusion Winchester '73 is a Western that delivers in every category you would come to expect of the genre; honour, love, masculinity, revenge, suspense and violence.
James Stewart is the protagonist ‘Lin McAdam’, Stephen McNally is the antagonist ‘Dutch Henry’ and the Winchester '73 is the macguffin.
Tony Curtis makes an appearance and Rock Hudson also appears in a small yet memorable role as the menacing leader of the Indian tribe who also have their sights set on the rifle.

James Stewart is excellent as the loveable all-American hero; very different to the morally ambiguous protagonists of other 1950’s Western films e.g. Ethan Edwards. Here is a film where the good guys are good, the bad guys are bad (Dutch Henry wears the black hat) and the Indians are, of course, scalp-crazy fiends. Of course the film works on multiple levels and critics can turn the rifle into a phallic object that is passed from hand to hand until Lin finally gains control of his masculinity crisis but really the true enjoyment of this film comes from simply watching it as it has all the makings of a classic.




chambanzi -> RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films (18/3/2012 11:04:01 AM)

85. Videodrome (1983)

Director: David Cronenberg

[image]http://www.cyberpunkreview.com/images/videodrome04.jpg[/image]

“Death to Videodrome, Long Live the New Flesh”

David Cronenberg is the master of films about bodily horror, anxieties and mutation. 'The Fly' is a cult classic but as far as I’m concerned Videodrome is the superior film as the idea is relevant to today on so many levels while also making stronger points about the dangers of experimenting with the body.
The style of the film is a low-budget B-movie, the majority of films like this become dated but not Videodrome because this style works perfectly with the subject matter. Videodrome is shot like a porno and that is exactly how it should be done.
Videodrome’s effectiveness lies in this idea that television will overcome reality, people will live on through technology and information on their lives can be stored and organised in neat copies way after their death.

Cronenberg said that this was a film that came to fruition based on his childhood browsing of radio signals, constantly in the fear (perhaps anxious excitement) that he would find something grotesque, not intended for the public to ever witness. This idea has morphed into the idea of the Videodrome signal, once picked up it causes wild hallucinations. Behind all of these thought trips is the idea of sex, sexual hunger, desire, appetite and the accompanying guilt and shame that follow culminating in self-destruction.
Max Renn (James Woods) is the protagonist who experiences frightful, tormenting and sexual hallucinations where large holes open in his body ready to have video- tapes inserted inside. These hallucinations eventually lead to a brain tumour, this terror could have been avoided if not for Renn’s sexual desires that led him to become tormented by Videodrome, yet there is a sense that we ARE Renn, we can relate to his hunger to see what shouldn’t be seen and we feel his guilt and shame. It is as if a teenager has looked at a porn site, he knows he shouldn’t and the family computer is now infected with a virus, the teenager feels terrible and knows what he has done is wrong. The virus is a small-scale version of the brain tumour, the mark left behind from sexual sin.
Pulling at the strings of desire even more is the dangerously erotic Nicki Brand (a fantastic performance by Deborah Harry) who is used as a seductive magnet to attract viewers into the dark world of Videodrome.

Of course Videodrome could be any euphoric downfall, perhaps drugs. Different readings of what it can and can’t be all depend on the individual for the film is very personal. There is a sense of impending dread, a sudden finger being pointed at you for opening Pandora’s box of horror because you couldn’t keep a lid on your fantasies.
Interestingly enough the film never loses track of Renn, everything he sees WE see. That was very deliberate of Cronenberg, Videodrome may be a platform for fulfilling sexual fantasies but Renn is a platform for us, the viewers who are left with no option but to self-reflect.





matty_b -> RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films (18/3/2012 11:12:42 AM)

Yeah, Videodrome is amazing.




Rebel scum -> RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films (18/3/2012 11:46:32 AM)

Videodrome is a great film, but:

quote:

ORIGINAL: chambanzi
'The Fly' is a cult classic but as far as I’m concerned Videodrome is the superior film


I disagree there, Brundle's downfall was much more compelling and emotionally moving than Videodrome, and The Fly's one of my all-time favourites.




impqueen -> RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films (18/3/2012 11:57:16 AM)

Cool-Beans! Glad you got something from a list of mine; it’s always nice when you find a new film. Have you seen the other Stewart/Mann westerns?  I never used to like the genre myself, too many wet Sunday afternoons watching John Wayne with my dad. Though I love many today and Wayne is an actor I appreciate far more than I used to despite still being a bit of a dick off-screen.

Videodrome is ace and probably my favourite Cronenberg. [:)]




chambanzi -> RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films (18/3/2012 1:32:42 PM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: Rebel scum

Videodrome is a great film, but:

quote:

ORIGINAL: chambanzi
'The Fly' is a cult classic but as far as I’m concerned Videodrome is the superior film


I disagree there, Brundle's downfall was much more compelling and emotionally moving than Videodrome, and The Fly's one of my all-time favourites.


Nah, just... nah [:D]
It is a good remake, silly fun and yeah it is emotionally moving but emotionally moving films are a dime a dozen. Videodrome is just raw originality and pure snuff and that's what I love about it.

And impqueen I haven't seen the other Mann's but I watched Winchester '73 while making the list and it gained the final spot. As for John Wayne, love him. I don't tend to read into actor's lives too much. I am a fan of films and appreciate actor's work within film and love their on screen characters but their personal political views and beliefs I don't care to know about just because I don't want to be biased. It's like Roman Polanski, the guy has a questionable life that I'd rather not think about as my personal opinion is that he is a great director but if I thought about it on that wavelength I'd be inclined to say I hate his work which isn't true.
I'm sure John Wayne was probably a massive tosser but when I see an old Western with him in it I get a sense of happiness. People always say James Stewart is a racist too, fucking hate racism but man I love that actor for his characters.

The only way I dislike an actor is if I don't like their characteristics on screen and for me Robin Williams defines that definition. The guy does my head in.





impqueen -> RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films (18/3/2012 1:51:46 PM)


I agree I read a lot of biographies and some of my favourite actors/directors have some in my view questionable principles.
 
Jimmy Stewart is one of my favourite three actors and nothing can persuade me otherwise even if I do dislike much of his political beliefs. It seems with Wayne people only see the right wing, racist nut job and I’ll admit he wasn’t the best of actors but on his day in the right film (The Searchers, Liberty Valance, Stagecoach, Red River, Yellow Ribbon), he was brilliant. I think the difference between Stewart and Wayne in terms of general everyday recognition is their respective public/filmic personas, though Stewart is obviously the better actor.   [:)]
 
Mann/Stewart: I love The Man from Laramie and The Naked Spur too and though I don’t think they are as good both The Far Country and Bend of the River are definitely worth checking out.
 




chambanzi -> RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films (18/3/2012 1:59:23 PM)

Ford and Stewart are very similar actors in the way that they could play very different characters but always had their stamp on it, they were still always Ford/Stewart whether it was a hero or villain. That seems to be a trait of older actors. I probably agree that Stewart is the better of the two.

Today method acting is all the rage and if you are completely different in every film e.g. you can play a necrophiliac, war hero, comedian, period drama romantic and mob villain with personalities so unique you lack a unique stamp then you are considered a great actor.
Personally I like actors from both disciplines.

I think I have seen part of the Man from Laramie ages ago but something happened (link probably expired) and I never finished it.




chambanzi -> RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films (18/3/2012 7:59:45 PM)

84. Burn After Reading (2008)

Directors: Joel and Ethan Coen


[image]http://static.moviefanatic.com/images/gallery/chad-feldheimer.jpg[/image]

After directing the likes of ‘No Country for Old Men’ it seemed like the Coen Brothers were having a joke with this over-the-top black comedy in which the alcoholic Osborne Cox (John Malkovich) is fired from the CIA and decides to write a memoir. His wife Katie (Tilda Swinton), who is having an extramarital affair with Harry Pfarrer, (George Clooney) decides this is the time to divorce him for she does not want him leeching her money. So, at the advice of her lawyer, Katie decides to investigate her husband's finances burning them onto a disk; oblivious to the fact his memoirs are on there. One of the lawyer’s colleagues leaves this behind at Hardbodies gym. Perhaps the funniest aspect is this woman who has such a limited amount of screen time puts the whole story into motion.
The disc enters the hands of Linda (Frances McDormand) and Chad (Brad Pitt) two stupid gym employees. Linda’s motive is to use the disc for bribery in order to pay for surgeries to give her a better body, which serves as a major driving force throughout the movie. I could quote this film all day like the previously reviewed In Bruges but the best thing is to just see it.
None of the characters in the film act in the appropriate manner which piles up the death count. Coincidence is a huge theme, no surprises for anyone familiar with the directors.

[image]http://img687.imageshack.us/img687/3452/screenshot20120315at232.png[/image]

Rarely does this film get mentioned when discussing the Coen’s finest work but it certainly should. This is an overlooked gem that rewards a second viewing for there is just too much content to pick up on first time. It is the well-concealed snippets of conversation or mannerisms of the characters that provide the majority of the humour. Brad Pitt as gym enthusiast Chad Feldheimer steals the show whether it is the subtle demonstration of his idiocy e.g. knocking on the glass wall of the gym office after he has entered or the in your face self-congratulatory fist pumping as he uses the running machine.
One moment I love is when Chad excitedly tells Linda about gaining a reward for returning the disk while raiding her fridge for a drink and halfway through comments on how far he has to jog to get to her place. It is making humour of small detail that most films forget to acknowledge. A character would usually just show up at somebodies door with no explanation as to how they got there yet this small line that would likely go unnoticed provides a mental image of Chad eagerly jogging to Linda’s apartment.
Chad at his finest however is his phone call to Osborne Cox where he tries to act like a villain from the movies by constantly repeating the name ‘Osborne Cox’ or his narrow eyed glare at Osborne upon their face-to-face meeting.
George Clooney comes close to stealing the show as an instantly dislikeable love rat, U.S marshal who ends up becoming one of the most endearing characters solely due to the ridiculous circumstances that befall him.
Richard Jenkins also provides an excellent performance as the sympathetic gym manager who has his eyes set on Linda (who obliviously searches for love online.)

Repetition is a frequent occurrence in Burn After Reading whether it is Harry repeating his story about having never fired his gun or Linda ending up in the same locations on dates with different men. These predictable locations contrasted with the unpredictability of the plot produce a film that would make a killer play.




MovieAddict247 -> RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films (18/3/2012 9:08:03 PM)

Brad Pitt is fantastic in Burn After Reading - if he hadn't been so pretty, I reckon he could have become a damn good character actor.




matty_b -> RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films (18/3/2012 9:11:21 PM)

I really, really like Burn After Reading, even if that seems to be a minority opinion.




chambanzi -> RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films (18/3/2012 9:39:38 PM)

I think a lot of people saw it once, didn't give it their full attention and dismissed it as average. It is very easy to do that with the Coens films. Pretty much all of them reward a re-watch because there is so much crammed in there. The amount of jokes or background things to notice in Burn After Reading is insane, its like an episode of The Simpsons.
Clooney, Pitt, Malkovich, McDormand, Jenkins and Swinton are all on top form and even the lawyer guy is hilarious.
The chemistry between Pitt and McDormand as two clueless best mates is amazing, especially considering how much of an unlikely pairing they are.

For the record this is my second favourite Coen Brothers film.




Gimli The Dwarf -> RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films (19/3/2012 5:07:00 AM)

I like Burn After Reading it a lot. So much in fact, I do this when I think about it.

[image]http://i63.photobucket.com/albums/h136/gimli_the_dwarf/avs/Other/Burn2.gif[/image][image]http://i63.photobucket.com/albums/h136/gimli_the_dwarf/avs/Other/Burn2.gif[/image][image]http://i63.photobucket.com/albums/h136/gimli_the_dwarf/avs/Other/Burn2.gif[/image]




chambanzi -> RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films (20/3/2012 12:28:10 PM)

83. All Quiet on the Western Front (1930)


Director: Lewis Milestone

[image]http://www.silentfilmstillarchive.com/stills/all_quiet_on_the_western_front251.jpg[/image]

All Quiet on the Western Front is a haunting film about the First World War told from a German perspective (despite the fact none of the actors have German accents.)
The film begins in the classroom where the teacher (in the way only a teacher can) inspires and motivates the young boys to fight for their country conjuring glamorous images of patriotism, heroism and self-worth in the boys.
Throughout the film it is difficult to keep track of the boys, who is who? However this reinforces the idea that the soldiers are simply numbers. It doesn’t matter who they are or what their personality is, they are simply pawns. When one of the boys retrieves his dead friend from No Man’s Land he is scowled at by his superior and told it not his friend but a corpse.

The message made abundantly clear is that the soldiers on the opposing side are also pawns and not the enemies they are painted out to be in patriotic war films (the dangerous kind.) The real enemies are the ones who sit behind their office ordering their men to death. For those of you who have seen Stanley Kubrick’s ‘Paths of Glory’ this will sound familiar; another excellent film set during World War One, the difference being that Paths of Glory was filmed after the Second World War. Watching All Quiet on the Western Front is that much more engaging due to the knowledge that World War II occurred after the film. This is shocking seeing as the film seems so educated in highlighting the stupidity of war and you can’t help but feel frustrated that people did not pay more attention to the film and its message which was as ahead of its time as the fantastically shot battle sequences and shocking imagery (severed hands holding onto a barbed wire fence is pretty deep for the 30’s right?)

The most harrowing scene is when the protagonist manages to stab a French soldier who falls into his trench and dies slowly next to him, his bitter attempts to try save the man’s life are futile. This scene highlights the fine line between what you are ordered to do and what is morally right. Back in the school classrooms a kill would be an achievement but actually lying in the trench and being surrounded by war it is a sickening crime. War is not depicted as a video game either, each soldier whether they are veteran or novice can die in an instant, nobody is superhuman and everybody has to fight like a dog for survival as they slip about the mud or jump frantically into cover.

Another powerful scene occurs outside the battlefield and sees the young men catching the attention of young women. What is so tragic is the indication that this is what young men should be enjoying out of life but the realism that they are destined to either lose limbs, die or suffer intolerable trench conditions and be left psychologically traumatised.
This film is one that will stay with you…..




MartinBlank76 -> RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films (20/3/2012 1:18:32 PM)

quote:

ORIGINAL: chambanzi

I think a lot of people saw it once, didn't give it their full attention and dismissed it as average. It is very easy to do that with the Coens films. Pretty much all of them reward a re-watch because there is so much crammed in there. The amount of jokes or background things to notice in Burn After Reading is insane, its like an episode of The Simpsons.
Clooney, Pitt, Malkovich, McDormand, Jenkins and Swinton are all on top form and even the lawyer guy is hilarious.
The chemistry between Pitt and McDormand as two clueless best mates is amazing, especially considering how much of an unlikely pairing they are.

For the record this is my second favourite Coen Brothers film.


I wonder if this might be me? As I really didnt like it when I saw it in the cinema. I found it unengaging and pretty pointless and I ended up quite bored with it all. And McDormand portrays one of the most irritating characters in the history of cinema, though that might have been the point.




MovieAddict247 -> RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films (20/3/2012 1:22:35 PM)

All Quiet on the Western Front is very good indeed. However, it's nothing compared to the book, which is stunning.




impqueen -> RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films (20/3/2012 1:26:59 PM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: MovieAddict247

All Quiet on the Western Front is very good indeed. However, it's nothing compared to the book, which is stunning.


This.


I might give BAR another go, to be honest I hated it on its release and haven’t gone back since, I really want to punch Pitt in the face. I much prefer A Serious Man which came a year later and is a favourite film of mine. [:)]




MartinBlank76 -> RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films (20/3/2012 1:38:20 PM)

quote:

ORIGINAL: impqueen


quote:

ORIGINAL: MovieAddict247

All Quiet on the Western Front is very good indeed. However, it's nothing compared to the book, which is stunning.


This.


I might give BAR another go, to be honest I hated it on its release and haven't gone back since, I really want to punch Pitt in the face. I much prefer A Serious Man which came a year later and is a favourite film of mine. [:)]


I didnt mind Pitt too much though that might have been because he was in the shadow of sheer irritance that was McDormands character.




garvielloken -> RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films (20/3/2012 7:45:55 PM)

Fantastic choice with Videodrome. I wasn't a huge fan of Burn After Reading first time round. I think the performances (especially Pitt) stood out as being better than the actual film (if that makes sense). Must give it a watch again soon for a reassessment.

Never seen All Quiet. [:(]




chambanzi -> RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films (20/3/2012 11:06:08 PM)

quote:

ORIGINAL: garvielloken

Fantastic choice with Videodrome. I wasn't a huge fan of Burn After Reading first time round. I think the performances (especially Pitt) stood out as being better than the actual film (if that makes sense). Must give it a watch again soon for a reassessment.

Never seen All Quiet. [:(]


Good to see a fan of Videodrome.
Burn After Reading is a film you can either connect with or not. I personally find it hilarious but it has to be taken lightly and in jest which is where I think the Coen's are at their best.

All Quiet is well worth a watch, its ahead of its time but you might laugh at the acting [:D]




chambanzi -> RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films (26/3/2012 12:10:11 PM)

82. The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (1962)

Director: John Ford

[image]http://parallax-view.org/wp-content/uploads/2009/05/mwslvnoraandpompey.jpg[/image]

Thanks to rancher Tom Doniphon (John Wayne), lawyer Ransom Stoddard (James Stewart) manages to survive a stagecoach robbery and near death at the hands of the feared Liberty Valance. Stoddard starts afresh working the kitchen of a restaurant in Shinbone. There he meets his future love interest Hallie who is romantically involved with Doniphon.
The age old expression ‘the pen is mightier than the sword’ rings true when Hallie becomes besotted to Stoddard; his well-spoken manner and dignified demeanor; much to the dismay of Doniphon.
Eventually Stoddard accepts a duel with Valance and thus begins the story of ‘The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance.’

Spoilers

A prevalent theme in John Ford’s classic is the distorted truth published by the media. People love an underdog and Ransom Stoddard is just that, a young lawyer who managed to best the notorious Liberty Valance. Is it fun that rancher Tom Doniphon shot him from the shadows? No, people don’t want to believe that, the media know this so they don’t publish the truth. Instead they choose the lucrative option and publish the legend.
Love interest Hallie is an example of one who would rather live by the legend for she chooses the overachieving, handsome intellectual over the rugged yet bountiful provider. The movie’s emotional climax sees Doniphon burn down the house he had built with the idea of settling down with Hallie once he had proposed.

Ransom is a loathsome character, only admitting to the truth upon the funeral of Doniphon. John Ford tricks us into rooting for Stoddard from the start, he is the apparent protagonist and Tom’s constant jealous and negativity towards him is irritating. In a sense we don’t want to believe Tom shot Valance either.
However I truly sympathise with Doniphon, who selflessly saves the life of Stoddard, for his strongest wish is for Hallie to be happy. The final act reveals his true nature as someone who (if he could go back in time) would have saved Stoddard preceding the stagecoach attack all over again, despite the fact Stoddard pretty much stole his one true love leading him to die alone. In this sense the film truly marks the death of the cowboy.




Rebel scum -> RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films (26/3/2012 1:31:58 PM)

My favourite Ford, great choice.




matty_b -> RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films (26/3/2012 2:30:55 PM)

Yeah, that's a brilliant film.

Would you really describe Ransom as loathsome, though?




chambanzi -> RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films (26/3/2012 11:46:11 PM)

When I watched the movie I liked him but if you think about it he pretty much came into town and stole the girl of the guy who saved his life twice and tried to help him learn to shoot. And he was also seen as some legend and hero. I guess that kind of frustrates me.




impqueen -> RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films (27/3/2012 9:03:27 AM)

I see your point but doesn’t Doniphon ask him not to tell anyone the truth (or at least Hallie), out with the old in with the new type of hero? It’s a heroically selfless thing to do mind.

Fantastic film though, great choice [:)]




chambanzi -> RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films (27/3/2012 10:59:16 AM)

He does but Ransom tries to admit the truth later anyway. I think Ransom just did things to suit him and he didn't want to tell the truth to begin with because the lie helped his career. Despite what he may have done/said I think he was fake.




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