RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films (Full Version)

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chambanzi -> RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films (5/3/2012 10:52:42 AM)

97. Princess Mononoke (1997)

Director: Hayao Miyazaki

[image]http://fc02.deviantart.net/fs32/i/2008/235/7/c/princess_mononoke_by_reda22.jpg[/image]

Princess Mononoke broke the record for being the most expensive Japanese animation of its time, which isn’t surprising considering the beautiful aesthetics of this flawless feature. As expected of Miyazaki’s work, Mononoke contains a strong moral at its core. Critics have labelled the film as an eco-fable, Miyazaki’s entire filmography boasts an anti-war message and Mononoke is no exception.

The occupancy of an ironworks threatens the inhabitants of a secluded Japanese forest stirring up a war between the miners wanting to exploit and the animal Gods wanting to preserve. These Gods are, of course led by San a.k.a Princess Mononoke (Mononoke translates as ‘spirit of a beast/evil spirits’ for those interested.)

A romance ensues between Mononoke and Ashitaka, who has travelled to the forests in search of a cure to the curse inflicted upon him during an encounter with a boar-demon.

[image]http://www.weirdasianews.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/01/Ashitaki-demon.jpg[/image]

This isn’t my favourite Miyazaki but it is certainly one of the ones I can go back to for a rewatch and it is certainly deserving of a spot on my top 100.
Perhaps the greatest invention is Yakul the elk that Ashitaka rides. Yakul is my boy and I would destroy anyone who hurt good ol’ Yakul.

[image]http://content8.flixster.com/question/39/15/15/3915150_std.jpg[/image]




elab49 -> RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films (5/3/2012 10:58:00 AM)

[image]http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-AxRW-llYEHE/TZHsB7UbgTI/AAAAAAAAA0I/rtu_xVtoZbk/s1600/princess_mononoke_033.jpg[/image]

I'm very fond of these guys. [:)]

Mononoke is a way down my Ghibli ranking but it's still a great film (it's just that they pretty much all are!)




Harry Tuttle -> RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films (5/3/2012 11:07:13 AM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: elab49

Mononoke is a way down my Ghibli ranking but it's still a great film (it's just that they pretty much all are!)


Same here. It's not as good as say Spirited Away, My Neighbour Totoro, Ponyo and Laputa but I'd probably still score it 5 stars.




chambanzi -> RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films (5/3/2012 11:13:00 AM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: Harry Tuttle


quote:

ORIGINAL: elab49

Mononoke is a way down my Ghibli ranking but it's still a great film (it's just that they pretty much all are!)


Same here. It's not as good as say Spirited Away, My Neighbour Totoro, Ponyo and Laputa but I'd probably still score it 5 stars.



Interesting that you have Ponyo in there and not Howl's Moving Castle since most people I have met LOVE that one. Personally Howl's is probably my least favourite.... though obviously its still a belter of a movie.




impqueen -> RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films (5/3/2012 11:19:38 AM)

I don’t love Ghibli as much as I believe I should. I don’t dislike any but I’m only a big fan of Porco Rosso, Spirited Away, Ponyo and Arrietty.




Harry Tuttle -> RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films (5/3/2012 11:20:58 AM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: chambanzi


quote:

ORIGINAL: Harry Tuttle


quote:

ORIGINAL: elab49

Mononoke is a way down my Ghibli ranking but it's still a great film (it's just that they pretty much all are!)


Same here. It's not as good as say Spirited Away, My Neighbour Totoro, Ponyo and Laputa but I'd probably still score it 5 stars.



Interesting that you have Ponyo in there and not Howl's Moving Castle since most people I have met LOVE that one. Personally Howl's is probably my least favourite.... though obviously its still a belter of a movie.


I love Howl but it isn't one of my favourite Miyazaki films, Ponyo is the first Ghibli I saw on the big screen and the first film I took my daughter to see in the pics so it has a certain sentimental value. I think Howl is one of elab's faves though IIRC.




elab49 -> RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films (5/3/2012 11:46:17 AM)

Last time I ranked them I had Howl's top. Specifically not the dubbed version, in case that makes any difference Chambanzi? the only other one I had in my 100 was Fireflies.

Howl's does seem to have gained some ground in the time I've been posting here, though.




rawlinson -> RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films (5/3/2012 11:47:17 AM)

All Ghibli films are incredible. Totoro is my fave though.




chambanzi -> RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films (5/3/2012 12:10:45 PM)

To be honest it was the dubbed version of Howl's that I saw. I think Mononoke and one other I won't name (as it comes up later) are the only two I watched with subtitles and interestingly enough two I enjoyed.




garvielloken -> RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films (5/3/2012 12:15:06 PM)

Good choices with Josey Wales and Mononoke. My top tier Ghibli would be Mononoke, Howl's, Totoro, Fireflies and Spirited Away. [:)]




chambanzi -> RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films (5/3/2012 12:25:51 PM)

96. Nights Of Cabiria (1957)

Director: Federico Fellini

[image]http://i2.listal.com/image/1456790/600full-nights-of-cabiria-screenshot.jpg[/image]

‘Nights of Cabiria’ presents the most bizarre opening to a film I have ever seen. Two lovers run hand in hand down a grassy bank, they embrace as the man swings the woman around playfully. Next they go to stand by a river as the woman excitedly swings her purse around, the man grabs the purse, pushes the woman in the river and legs it.

This scene marks one of many ordeals this young woman endures and all are humorous, as an audience we can’t help but laugh as the heart-breaking story of prostitute Maria Ceccarelli is unfurled.
It is with dramatic irony that we view a naive Maria, who seemingly finds love and acceptance yet is repeatedly and subsequently made a fool of. A key scene sees Maria beaming with joy, finally believing she has ‘made it’ as she dances in one of Rome’s elite and fashionable nightclubs. She dances excitedly like a child oblivious to the impression she is setting while dissolving our expectations of how a prostitute would act.

Giulietta Masina’s performance is exceptional, we feel the character’s humiliation as she is hypnotised into acting out her heart’s longings, and we feel her hope as she attends a religious festival.
The ending scene has garnered the most praise, for me it simply reinforces Maria’s nature as a person who soldiers on fighting for something better. She is the complete opposite to a character such as Crocker Harris from ‘The Browning Version’ in that despite the hardships inflicted upon her, she still remains optimistic in her life’s journey. This endearing nature makes us respect Maria despite her seemingly poor life choices.

Despite a reputation amongst inverted snobs as making pretentious cinema, Fellini’s ‘Nights of Cabiria’ is perhaps the least self-righteous and warmest film you could see.






rick_7 -> RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films (5/3/2012 12:29:12 PM)

Yeah, great film. One of Fellini's best, before he disappeared up his own arse: humanist, poignant, wonderfully warm and touching, with a simply perfect ending. Masina is absolutely extraordinary. I wonder if La Strada will make the list - I think that's every bit as great.




chambanzi -> RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films (5/3/2012 12:36:49 PM)

It is the only Fellini film, it was a toss up between those two and ultimately I went with this one, but as you said both are great. This one has the advantage in so far as being the one I first saw.




elab49 -> RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films (5/3/2012 12:38:48 PM)

[:'(]

There had to be one, though, didn't they. [:D]

Well, two if you add La Strada.




rick_7 -> RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films (5/3/2012 12:39:45 PM)

quote:

ORIGINAL: chambanzi

It is the only Fellini film, it was a toss up between those two and ultimately I went with this one, but as you said both are great. This one has the advantage in so far as being the one I first saw.

Ah right, cool. Yeah, I think they're his best two. There are others I admire (and several that are just shit, like Roma), but I think those are his greatest because they're so rich in emotion, rather than conduits for his philosophical ruminations.




Rebel scum -> RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films (5/3/2012 1:21:07 PM)

Ah, two I've seen!

Princess Mononoke is great, but of the Ghibli I've seen it's not as good as Spirited Away, Totoro or Grave of the Fireflies

Nights of Cabiria was decent, I prefer 8 1/2 but at least you didn't pick La Dolce Vita.




rawlinson -> RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films (5/3/2012 1:22:42 PM)

Amarcord is my favourite FF, closely followed by his Toby Dammit section of Spirits of the Dead. If only the rest of the film was that good.




chambanzi -> RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films (5/3/2012 1:43:44 PM)

Every time I think of Amacord I just think of that infamous lifting scene.




chambanzi -> RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films (5/3/2012 5:11:44 PM)

95. Being There (1979)

Director: Hal Ashby

[image]http://30.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_kqaauocoSr1qzsuffo1_500.jpg[/image]

Being There tells the story of a simple- minded gardener (Peter Sellers) who has never stepped foot off the estate he tends to and has spent a lifetime watching television.
Through circumstance he becomes involved with a sophisticated and well-connected dying man and his wife.

Everything Chance says is dumb ignorance but the intellectual characters interpret each meaning metaphorically. That is because Chance is very good at applying what he does know (gardening and television) to conversation thus, “As long as the roots are not severed, all is well” becomes an optimistic statement relating to the economy.

Perhaps it is intelligence that deters achievement due to dangerous patterns such as over-analysis, a mark of insecurity. Chance is perfectly confident because he is ignorant and as the saying goes ‘Ignorance is Bliss.’
Upon meeting the president Chance is loved because he is not overwhelmed, he seduces the female lead because he is not shy and doesn’t show her undue attention. He is an honest man of few words but also very impersonal as seen in the way he copes with the deaths of other characters.

SPOILERS

The climax of the film sees Chance literally walk on water as we hear a voice-over of the president saying, “Life is a state of mind.”
As we know, it is impossible to walk on water but the film tells us that is because we know it is impossible. Because Chance doesn’t realise this, he can. Obviously there is a metaphor within a metaphor as the walking on water represents walking through life with relative ease.
I recommend this film if you fancy a character study sprinkled with comedy.




elab49 -> RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films (5/3/2012 5:16:00 PM)

This is, again, a lovely list [:)]

Odd career Ashby - a couple of great films and a raft of oddities or problem cases.




rawlinson -> RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films (5/3/2012 5:39:53 PM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: chambanzi

Every time I think of Amacord I just think of that infamous lifting scene.


[:D] It is memorable. Being There is really good, but my fave Ashby are all at the start of the 70s.




MartinBlank76 -> RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films (6/3/2012 8:51:50 AM)

For me the infernal affairs trilogy is superior to the departed and I think Part 2 is the best of the bunch.

I didnt enjoy Monoke as much as I thought I would though it was still good. My faves would be in no particular order Howls, spirted away, laputa, and pom poko.




MovieAddict247 -> RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films (6/3/2012 12:49:06 PM)

Princess Monoke is very, very good indeed, but I don't really like it. It does look stunning though.




matty_b -> RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films (6/3/2012 12:56:18 PM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: MovieAddict247

Princess Monoke is very, very good indeed, but I don't really like it. It does look stunning though.


[image]http://gifs.gifbin.com/1238512492_the-happening-wahlberg.gif[/image]




MovieAddict247 -> RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films (6/3/2012 1:00:28 PM)

quote:

ORIGINAL: matty_b


quote:

ORIGINAL: MovieAddict247

Princess Monoke is very, very good indeed, but I don't really like it. It does look stunning though.


[image]http://gifs.gifbin.com/1238512492_the-happening-wahlberg.gif[/image]



I'm going to assume that that's a gif expressing your agreement. Though I expect it isn't.




matty_b -> RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films (6/3/2012 1:05:09 PM)

No, I'm just confused as to how something can be very, very good but you don't like it. [:D]




MovieAddict247 -> RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films (6/3/2012 1:13:00 PM)

I appreciate it's very well-made, but I just don't warm to it like the other Ghibli films. I've seen it a couple of times, but it's never one I'd choose to rewatch.

Though those little tree spirit mushroomy things are lovely.




matty_b -> RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films (6/3/2012 1:19:46 PM)

Ah, OK. Fair enough. [:D]




chambanzi -> RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films (6/3/2012 7:52:18 PM)

94. Ratatouille (2007)

Directors: Brad Bird, Jan Pinkava

[image]http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2007/06/28/arts/29rat600.1.jpg[/image]

Ratatouille saw a stellar return to form for Pixar and set the precedent for a ‘humble’ Disney (later followed up on by the likes of Wall E, Up, Toy Story 3) as opposed to the in your face sappiness of, say Monsters Inc or Finding Nemo.

Remy is a rat with a love and genuine passion for food therefore he is my type of guy/rat. He is a fantastic chef but who wants a rat in the kitchen?
Thus using an ingenious hair pulling method Remy aids the bumbling Linguini by making a chef of him while at the same time able to fulfill his dream.

My favourite scene has to be when food critic Anton Ego, in a wave of nostalgia, is transported back to his youth upon tasting Remy’s cooking.
It is one of those ‘proud moments’ where we are satisfied that the protagonist has achieved something and, as Ego says,
“Not everyone can become a great artist, but a great artist can come from anywhere.”

I agree wholeheartedly with what the film says about critics, how the average piece of junk is more meaningful than their criticism designating it so yet when they defend a new artist or something new they risk everything while giving everything back to the artist.
Interesting food for thought from the production company that churned out ‘Cars.’




impqueen -> RE: Chambanzi's Favourite 100 Films (6/3/2012 7:56:07 PM)

Yay, I’m hugely fond of Ratatouille, it was a blind watch at a time when I wasn’t paying attention and didn’t realise it was Pixar and I think it’s underrated. I like the joke about being rude but French [:)]




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