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Peppermint -> The return of the Golden Oldies (10/10/2005 4:34:12 PM)

I saw recently thread, starting with this one:
 
The Paradine Case - not as entertaining a courtroom based story as Witness For The Prosecution, but it gave me something to watch the other day - 3/5




Geir -> RE: The return of the Golden Oldies (2/1/2006 11:25:46 AM)

Notorious (1946) - Great! Good suspense and love story.
Patton (1970) - Interesting story about a looney general. Good performances.




Harry Lime -> RE: The return of the Golden Oldies (2/1/2006 8:05:25 PM)

Sullivans Travels (1941) - A masterclass in satire from Preston Sturges. Joel McCrea plays the pampered Hollywood comedy director who decides that to make a dark social commentary about the depression he should first live amongst the vagrants to fully understand poverty. Veronica Lake puts in a wonderful turn as the dejected would-be starlet he meets on his way. 5/5




Shawlord -> RE: The return of the Golden Oldies (2/1/2006 8:36:22 PM)

Started watching The Thin Man (1934) this morning, it really seemed very good but I was tired and kept nodding off, oops.

I also watched most of The Maltese Falcon (1941) which was on directly afterwards.  I enjoyed it the first time I saw it but even more so this time.  Bogart is just on top form as Sam Spade.

I continued my oldies triple bill by watching Hitchcocks Notorious (1946), Grant is delightfully understated in this spy film co starring the lovely Ingrid Bergman.  Suspense, mystery and intrigue galore.




Geir -> RE: The return of the Golden Oldies (5/1/2006 3:33:12 PM)

À bout de souffle (1960) (Breathless) - My first Godard! I enjoyed it. I think I can see where some of Jarmusch's inspiration originates from, with scenes of the mundane.




Geir -> RE: The return of the Golden Oldies (6/1/2006 6:55:36 AM)

Week End (1967) - My second Godard! [;)] Apart from the traffic jam scene which was oddly amusing, I didn't like it. I get the social commentary and all, but I couldn't get to grips with the form.




Harry Lime -> RE: The return of the Golden Oldies (8/1/2006 2:40:34 AM)

The Tattooed Stranger (1950) - An intriguingly premised police-procedural B-movie which follows a pair of homocide detectives (John Miles and Walter Kinsella) on an investigation amidst the back streets of New York following the discovery of the body of an unidentified woman in Central Park. Some excellent location photography and interesting supporting characters just about do enough to maintain interest despite the incredibly stilted dialogue and the extremely wooden performances of the leads. 2/5
 
The Brighton Strangler (1945) -  Truly abysmal British B-movie. When theatre actor (John Loder) is injured in a West End air raid he regains conciousness with the unwitting belief that he is actually the murderous character that he played in his last role. Co-starring June Duprez and Michael St. Angel. 1/5




James2183 -> RE: The return of the Golden Oldies (8/1/2006 6:56:21 PM)

Caught Paths of Glory last night for the first time. Douglas was brilliant and you can certainly see Kubrick learning his craft in it. Really gets you thinking about the outcome of the three men chosen. Has made me want to get hold of The Killing now. 




Krazy_Beyootiful -> RE: The return of the Golden Oldies (8/1/2006 9:41:07 PM)

Move Over Darling (1963)
 
This is a cheerfully lighthearted and funny remake of My Favourite Wife (which I haven't seen.) Doris Day stars as one of the wives of James Garner, she was declared legally dead for five years, and then shows up on the honeymoon of his second marriage, quite put out that he has seemingly betrayed her. Meanwhile Garner's new wife is getting increasingly frustrated at not being able to consummate her marriage with her husband. Doris Day really does do outrage very well, she stomps and pouts her way through the film delightfully, the funniest scene being where she ends up going through a carwash with the roof down and comes out wailing "my hair!"  All in all it's a cute feel good romcom that left me with a smile on my face.




Krazy_Beyootiful -> RE: The return of the Golden Oldies (9/1/2006 5:58:44 PM)

The Red Shoes (1948)
 
The first film I've watched from the Powell and Pressburger collection, The Red Shoes is a beautiful film. A delightful triumph of visual beauty over characterisation and plot, it is essentially a study on art, and what true art means and requires. The cinematogrpahy is flawless and fantastic to watch, and the ballet scenes are especially stunning. The film is let down slightly by the main characters, Vicky and in particular Julian. It would be more possible to feel sympathy with Vicky's plight if Julian were a more sympathetic character. As it is it's hard to understand why Vicky is tempted to throw away her extraordinary talent for a man who offers her so little. Julian comes across as self-obsessed, he loves Vicky for the inspiration she gives him yet cares nothing for the love that she abandons for him. He writes an opera while her ballet shoes languish in a drawer, there's no equality of sacrifice or love. I was left with more sympathy towards the slightly tyrannical Boris Lermontov, who at least wanted Vicky to fulfill her talent. However, the story is engaging enough that I felt for all the charcaters at the slightly melodramatic conclusion and in the end this film is first and foremost an artistic study of art and it is a beautifully realised artistic film.




Jasiri -> RE: The return of the Golden Oldies (9/1/2006 7:37:45 PM)

quote:

ORIGINAL: James2183
Has made me want to get hold of The Killing now. 

The Killing is easily my favourite of Kubrick's films.Great combination of characters and a strong intricate story that builds real tension.






Gimli The Dwarf -> RE: The return of the Golden Oldies (10/1/2006 5:16:55 AM)

Since the New Year, I've seen the following, all first time viewings

They Live By Night (48) - 3/5 - Highly watchable yet never really captivating. Good performances though.

The Damned (69)- 3/5 - Possibly the best performance I've seen Dirk Bogarde give, but the film is far too long for its story.

La Dolce Vita (60) - 3/5 - It looks lovely with some mesmerising scenes, but I honestly couldn't care for any of the characters and I never really wanted to know what happened next.

The Battleship Potemkin (25)- 5/5 - Superb right from the start, with scene after scene grabbing hold of your attention. I literarlu couldn;t take my eyes off the screen. everybit as good as its been made out to be.

Sweet Smell Of Success (57)- 5/5 - Burt Lancaster and Tony Curtis are both superb in this, helped by a excellent script.




Leomuse -> RE: The return of the Golden Oldies (11/1/2006 11:29:30 PM)

Little Norse Prince
1968
Isao Takahata
1st viewing

D+




Leomuse -> RE: The return of the Golden Oldies (14/1/2006 11:43:35 AM)

Plan 9 from Outer Space
1959
Edward D. Wood Jr.
1st viewing

F
Yeah. It's bad.




James2183 -> RE: The return of the Golden Oldies (15/1/2006 1:46:47 PM)

quote:

ORIGINAL: Jasiri

quote:

ORIGINAL: James2183
Has made me want to get hold of The Killing now. 

The Killing is easily my favourite of Kubrick's films.Great combination of characters and a strong intricate story that builds real tension.


Just ordered it from Blahdvd for £5 [:D]




MF DOOM -> RE: The return of the Golden Oldies (17/1/2006 5:00:04 PM)

Shadow Of A Doubt (1943)
1st Viewing
[image]http://dvdbeaver.com/film/DVDReviews17/a%20Alfred%20Hitchcock%20-%20Masterpiece%20Collection%20DVD%20Review/poster%20shadow%20of%20a%20doubt%20Alfred%20Hitchcock%20-%20Masterpiece%20Collection%20DVD%20Review.jpg[/image]

Another great Hitchcock flick, pretty simple story but the chemistry between Uncle Charlie and young Charlie was great and the will he or wont he questions regarding his plan when Young Charlie found out was suspenseful like you'd expect from a Hitchcock movie. 4/5




TheDudeAbides -> RE: The return of the Golden Oldies (18/1/2006 8:57:53 AM)

Yankee Doodle Dandy
A
Who knew Cagney could dance like this? I've been singing the title song all month...




MF DOOM -> The return of the Golden Oldies (18/1/2006 5:24:49 PM)

The Lady Vanishes (1938)
1st Viewing
[image]http://www.hitchcockmania.it/filmografia/the_lady_vanishes_lasignora_scompare/poster/fb_01.jpg[/image]

This was simply fantastic. I think it’s going into my top 20 even and one of my favourite Hitchcock movies now. I really had no idea other than the fact of someone vanishing since the title was The Vanishing Lady. The way the movie starts with being light hearted and funny was great and how he set the pace to the search in the train as well as uncovering of the story. I seriously can’t show anymore appreciation to the master of cinema, forget Spielberg and all those overrated movie makers, this man is just pure genius. Okay, off the bandwagon. 5/5




MF DOOM -> RE: The return of the Golden Oldies (21/1/2006 11:33:32 AM)

Suspicion (1941)
1st Viewing
[image]http://hitchcock.tv/mov/suspicion/images/suspicion.jpg[/image]
To be honest I’m not sure. This movie was great but after reading some stuff on IMDB I’m left a bit confused and wonder if the ending was all a set up but Hitchcock made us believe what he wanted and the studios messed up with the ending they wanted. Even with that unsatisfying ending I feel as if Hitchcock got his message across and I still thought he was lying at the end and just got away with it. I suppose it’s a movie that depends on how you see it or take it because it can be a very smart ending if you still believe he is guilty or a shitty ending if what he said to her at the end was true. In my personal opinion I know Hitch went for the earlier and even though the movie ends with the later, like I said, I still felt he got his message across and I took Hitch’s ending in my head without even reading all that stuff. I must say also the colours and shadows in the movie were amazing. 4/5




rick_7 -> RE: The return of the Golden Oldies (22/1/2006 1:43:15 AM)

That's a nice reading of the film - I think it works well either way.  Unfortunately the Code put paid to a lot of decent suspense thrillers, one of the more interesting being an RKO-produced picture called The Strange Affair of Uncle Harry, which has arguably the most ludicrous coda ever devised.  There are some wonderfully atmospheric moments in Suspicion, particularly those revolving around the Grant/Bruce relationship.  I like Joan Fontaine's performance too, she was an underrated and extremely agreeable actress.

Did you happen to catch the inspired Scrabble sight-gag?




James2183 -> RE: The return of the Golden Oldies (22/1/2006 2:35:22 PM)

The Killing - Stanley Kubrick

Jumped up to second in my favourite Kubrick films. Loved the way the film cut between characters and places in time. Acting was spot on and didn't lull at all. Is it just me or can people see how True Romance 'borrowed' from this film?




rick_7 -> RE: The return of the Golden Oldies (22/1/2006 2:43:17 PM)

It's been a while since I saw True Romance - do you mean the "loot stolen by better organised and more ruthless crooks" dynamic?  That was nabbed off Rififi.

I like The Killing very much, it's fast-moving and well-directed and the supporting cast is exceptional.  Elisha Cook, Jr., Timothy Carey, Marie Windsor and Joe Turkel in one movie, wow.  As you say, the complex time-frame of the narrative is also beautifully handled.  A few critics/Kubrick fans have objected to what they saw as an excessive use of voiceover, but I thought it was necessary and nicely delivered.




James2183 -> RE: The return of the Golden Oldies (22/1/2006 2:47:23 PM)

Spoilers.


It wasn't so much that but more of a stand off between the crooks who did the heist and the crooks who were tipped off in the room together. The way they end up shooting one another and having one escape reminded me very much of True Romance. 




Dignan -> RE: The return of the Golden Oldies (24/1/2006 9:27:21 PM)

Just did my Howard Hawks double bill of The Big Sleep (1946) and His Girl Friday (1940). Both excellent films, 5/5, Hawks was a master of all genres.




Harry Lime -> RE: The return of the Golden Oldies (25/1/2006 12:04:58 AM)

The Apu Trilogy

    Pather Panchali (1955)5/5
    Aparajito (1957) - 5/5
    Apur Sansar (1959) - 5/5

Forget your Godfathers, your Lord Of The Rings and your Star Wars. This is the greatest trilogy of all time. Director Satyajit Ray brought Indian cinema to International attention with this majestically weaved tale that traces the poignant journey of the son of an impoverished but ever loving Bengali family from birth through to adulthood. Lyrical, tragic and uplifting, each of the three films are filled with a simple and natural beauty that encompass all the joy and all the sorrow of life.

A Bout De Soufflé (1960) - Jean-Luc Godards stylish Nouvelle Vague masterpiece. Jean-Paul Belmondo is superb as the wise guy car thief who finds himself a wanted man after he kills a policeman. As he shuttles around Paris trying to track down the man who owes him the money that will help him escape to Italy he also finds himself falling in love with a young American (Jean Seberg) with whom he has been having an affair. Effortlessy cool. 5/5

What's Up Tiger Lily? (1966) - Turgid comedy experiment from Woody Allen. Using a genuine Japanese thriller as the frame, Allen dubs in new voices and sound effects to create a comic spy caper. A novel idea but one that quickly becomes tedious. 2/5

Roma, Cittá Aperta (1945) - Directed by Roberto Rosselini in the immediate aftermath of World War Two, this is a stunning study of the Italian resistance to the Nazi occupation. Shot in a stark documentary style that would go on to herald the arrival neo-realism to World cinema, the film contains some strong performances from a cast of almost entirely non-actors whilst the relentless and downbeat sense of oppression and fear is tempered by a genuine sense of human spirit. Anna Magnani is particularly memorable as the pregnant lover of a resistance fighter and the film is morally anchored around a fine turn from Aldo Fabrizi as the sympathetic priest. 5/5




R.J.MacReady -> RE: The return of the Golden Oldies (25/1/2006 12:22:15 AM)

I want to see The Apu Trilogy so much it hurts.

Faster Pussycat... Kill! Kill! (1965; Russ Meyer)

Hilarious groundbreaking film from Meyer's gothic period, with three buxom ladies out in the American desert with a passion for fast cars and a scheme to steal an old man's fortune. Plenty of cleavage and suggestive remarks, but essentially good fun.
Probably the only Meyer film you should consider showing to a new girlfriend.




MF DOOM -> RE: The return of the Golden Oldies (25/1/2006 12:05:00 PM)

quote:

ORIGINAL: R.J.MacReady

I want to see The Apu Trilogy so much it hurts.


Like wise, but too expensive.




Leomuse -> RE: The return of the Golden Oldies (29/1/2006 10:40:15 PM)

12 Angry Men
1957
Sidney Lumet
1st viewing

****/****




rick_7 -> RE: The return of the Golden Oldies (29/1/2006 11:30:21 PM)

quote:

ORIGINAL: R.J.MacReady

I want to see The Apu Trilogy so much it hurts.

Faster Pussycat... Kill! Kill! (1965; Russ Meyer)

Hilarious groundbreaking film from Meyer's gothic period, with three buxom ladies out in the American desert with a passion for fast cars and a scheme to steal an old man's fortune. Plenty of cleavage and suggestive remarks, but essentially good fun.
Probably the only Meyer film you should consider showing to a new girlfriend.


I was watching that the other day.  The bit where Tura Satana kills the young time-trialer is hysterical!  Sure, the Apu trilogy is pretty good, but if it had drag-racing go-go dancers rolling around on top of each other in the desert, I must have missed them.




TheDudeAbides -> RE: The return of the Golden Oldies (30/1/2006 8:50:03 AM)

The Fighting 69th (1940)

Continuing my Cagney quest. Solid 1st world war flick, with decent support.




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