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Empire Admin -> Tyrannosaur (4/10/2011 11:13:19 PM)

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losthighway -> MASSIVELY DISAPPOINTING! (4/10/2011 11:13:20 PM)

Paddy Considine's debut feature is sadly a massive disappointment. A full 90mins of misery and kitchen sink drama by numbers. The first 10mins sets the tone of the film and it's pretty much slit your wrists time from there to the finish. The performances are good but sadly the plot is weak, seen it all before and you just don't care enough for either of the main characters because the film gets bogged down in so much misery and violence. I'd mention some of what to expect but it would seriously ruin the plot for anyone who wishes to see it. I wish I could say there was a point to this film - and Paddy in the Q&A afterwards stated it was about disparate people from different communities coming together - sorry but I failed to see that... nor did the several people who walked out the screening well before the end of the film! He said that Nil By Mouth was certainly an influence - the misery is certainly there but NBM is in a totally different league! A dull, pointless miseryfest with a trailer that promised so much more. I can't recommend this one folks. Sorry!

Overall: 1.5/5




losthighway -> MASSIVELY DISAPPOINTING! (4/10/2011 11:13:21 PM)

REVIEW POSTED TWICE. COMMENT DELETED!




Spaldron -> RE: MASSIVELY DISAPPOINTING! (6/10/2011 1:29:47 PM)

Hope to see this in the next few days, will report back.




rick_7 -> RE: MASSIVELY DISAPPOINTING! (6/10/2011 1:33:26 PM)

quote:

ORIGINAL: Spaldron

Hope to see this in the next few days, will report back.

Why don't you just erect a tent in the cinema lobby? I thought I went to the movies a lot... [:D]




Spaldron -> RE: MASSIVELY DISAPPOINTING! (6/10/2011 1:37:28 PM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: rick_7

quote:

ORIGINAL: Spaldron

Hope to see this in the next few days, will report back.

Why don't you just erect a tent in the cinema lobby? I thought I went to the movies a lot... [:D]



[:D][:D][:D]

Thing is I rarely went to the cinema till I moved 5 minutes away from one and got one of those unlimited cards. Hell its £15 a month and I'm damn sure gonna get my moneys worth. [;)]




rick_7 -> RE: MASSIVELY DISAPPOINTING! (6/10/2011 1:45:03 PM)

Ah, cool. [:D] I think I could quite happily live in a cinema. I'm already kind of hooked on the smell and it would make that whole Ryan Gosling/Owen Wilson completist thing so much easier to manage. This is not really a review of Tyrannosaur, for which I apologise.




Paulo1 -> Very Annoyed (7/10/2011 3:32:29 PM)

I really want to see this film but my local 17 screen cinema has decided not to show it. Same with Melancholia. Why do they do this to me? Surely they can spare just one of the screens for even just one night, but no they want to show shite like Johnny English, and Shark Night.




Spaldron -> RE: Very Annoyed (7/10/2011 4:58:05 PM)

Off to see this tonight.




Spaldron -> RE: Sterling debut by Considine (8/10/2011 1:27:28 AM)

Just seen this and can report its every bit as good as the majority of reviews say it is. A solid and good old fashioned kitchen sink drama that we do so well here. Peter Mullan is terrific as always as is Eddie Marsan but the breakout here is Olivia Coleman who delivers one of this years best performances. Powerful and heartbreaking at the same time, Paddy Considine shows he is very capable behind the camera and I hope this isn't the last feature he directs. 4/5




NinjaShortbread212 -> RE: Sterling debut by Considine (8/10/2011 4:56:08 AM)

quote:

ORIGINAL: Spaldron

Just seen this and can report its every bit as good as the majority of reviews say it is. A solid and good old fashioned kitchen sink drama that we do so well here. Peter Mullan is terrific as always as is Eddie Marsan but the breakout here is Olivia Coleman who delivers one of this years best performances. Powerful and heartbreaking at the same time, Paddy Considine shows he is very capable behind the camera and I hope this isn't the last feature he directs. 4/5



I couldn't have said it better myself! [sm=happy34.gif]
I had a lump in my throat a few times during this film, it definitely leaves an impression on you that's for sure.

Real, honest and brutal. I'll give it 4/5. [:)]




adambatman82 -> RE: Tyrannosaur (8/10/2011 3:57:20 PM)

I saw the film last weekend, complete with Q&A from Considine. Here's a copy and paste of my review. In short I think its the best British film of a massively successful one for our national cinema.


Paddy Considine, one of the UK’s finest actors turns his hand to directing, with an unsettling work that is as horrifically volatile as it is tender deconstruction of the typical romanticist Hollywood love story.

Tyrannosaur explores the relationship between two very different, but ultimately drawn together figures, Joseph and Hannah. Joseph is an explosive, aggressive man, and one who is presented as to be taking on the world. Hannah, on the other hand, is gentle, a passive woman, whose faith dictates to her that everything will be all right. On the surface at least. Both are alcoholics, and almost inverted caricatures of what they claim to be. Hannah is married to a man that manipulates and beats her, and Joseph is essentially a walking metaphor for the brutal truth of a man broken. His outward visage says one thing, but he feels another. Hannah’s outward projections are very much positive, but inside she is anything but. The film itself charts the way in which the couple meets. Story is ultimately rather slight, but the manner in which said story is plotted ultimately covers over any sense of flimsy.

Structurally the film bounces effectively between the two stories being presented. The first section of the film tells Joseph’s story, while the second tells Hannah’s, before the two narratives become intertwined, reflecting the (love) story at the heart of the work. The film, an extended adaptation of Considine’s earlier short film, the BAFTA award winning Dog Altogether, is a very difficult work to bear witness to. A river of unease runs through the work, from the opening moments of genuinely heartbreaking and wholly gut-wrenching violence, through to the films almost biblical final act. The film is punctuated by contemplative fades, forcing the viewer to linger on what Considine is presenting.

The final sequence in the film recalls the epiphany of Robert Bresson’s Pickpocket, which in itself is a work that deals with faith, by a filmmaker whose own attitude towards religion defined his career. The same scene was paid homage to in Paul Schrader’s American Gigolo, with the focus of faith, or the concept of the faith at hand, shifted, but again, produced by a filmmaker whose oeuvre is defined as much by the director’s faith as it was anything else. While Considine’s own religious leanings are thus far unspecified, and I suspect he is more in line with Joseph’s attitude towards Christianity than Hannah’s, its not unreasonable to claim that the films ultimate conclusion is one of spiritual fulfilment.

The central turns are really quite something. Peter Mullan hasn’t been this great in some time, with this films Joseph recalling, coincidentally enough, his work in My Name Is Joe. Olivia Colman is little short of a revelation. While Joseph may be the primary focus of the film, Colman’s Hannah is the ultimate figure of focus in Tyrannosaur. While the film has a relatively small cast, with the majority of the action focusing on the two main players, there are a number of brief supporting performances that are also notable. Eddie Marsan, as the abusive husband of Hannah is introduced to the scenario in quite the manner, with his introductory scene perhaps the ultimate example of the unflinching nature of the film. Ned Dennehy as Joseph’s loyal drunk of a friend provides a hint of humour that is otherwise lacking from the film. Rather than jarring with the overall tone of the picture, Dennehy’s likeable charmer provides moments of respite between the anguish.

Comparisons to Gary Oldman’s Nil By Mouth are to be expected, no less because of the presence of that films director in the closing credits of Tyrannosaur, with Considine himself stating that he felt as though he and Oldman shared something within their attitude towards their work. Both films take a different approach to the films of Leigh, Loach or the usual crowd of British film in this tradition. Considine has been keen to reinforce that Tyrannosaur is not social realism. While it may tick a few of the boxes of that particular area of the cinema it is very particularly a different beast by design. Considine has was not making an issues movie, nor was he deliberately producing a work of such brutality that it would be misread as being a “shorthand to shock”, in the directors own words. Tyrannosaur defies expectations, and while “profound” is a word that I fear I tend to overuse, it is really quite appropriate here. Tyrannosaur provoked a genuine emotional response from this viewer, and, not just one (emotional response). At times it is terrifying, a sense of omnipresent dread lingers over the work from the opening brutal moments, yet there is a comforting tone as well. Ultimately though, it is a sincere work, one with no pretentions, and one which presents the cinematic truth that so many filmmakers strive for.

2011 is turning out to be something of a vintage year for British filmmaking. Eschewing the tradition of what British cinema is, or is meant to be, a group of young filmmakers have produced works that defy geographical limits, and really attempt to push the boundaries of cinema. The British film industry is in a very good place right now, and there isn’t a corset in sight.





adambatman82 -> RE: Sterling debut by Considine (8/10/2011 4:02:28 PM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: Spaldron

Just seen this and can report its every bit as good as the majority of reviews say it is. A solid and good old fashioned kitchen sink drama that we do so well here. Peter Mullan is terrific as always as is Eddie Marsan but the breakout here is Olivia Coleman who delivers one of this years best performances. Powerful and heartbreaking at the same time, Paddy Considine shows he is very capable behind the camera and I hope this isn't the last feature he directs. 4/5


I don't know, I think it goes well beyond that. Considine himself said that he went out of his way to avoid the trappings of what is expected of British cinema, and I agree with him. It reminds me far more of a film like Ratcatcher, which inverted social realist traditions and in turn became something of a timeless, geographically void fairy tale. Case in point, Tyrannosaur was shot two miles away from where I was born and spent the first 20 years of my life, and I didn't actually notice until I read an interview afterwords.

For more on this point check out Considine's interview in this months Sight & Sound, where he attacks the accusations of this being a typical slice of Loach-esque British cinema with borderline resentment for the interviewer. Its a great read, and contains more profanities in its two pages than you'd normally find in a whole year of S&S!




losthighway -> RE: Sterling debut by Considine (8/10/2011 9:02:07 PM)

quote:

For more on this point check out Considine's interview in this months Sight & Sound, where he attacks the accusations of this being a typical slice of Loach-esque British cinema with borderline resentment for the interviewer. Its a great read, and contains more profanities in its two pages than you'd normally find in a whole year of S&S


I think this was my main issue with the film... i was dying to hear what the point of the film was and whilst explaining about the community aspect mentioned in my review, he also stated this very same point about it not being a 'Loach-esque' film... but imho, it was! I didn't see anything new. You mention Ratcatcher but Tyrannosaur wasn't like that film either (again imo). It fell firmly into a kitchen sink drama by numbers formula and didn't budge from start to finish. I think the other issue that I found at the Q&A with Paddy was that he clearly had a passion about his film but the way he described it and gave information about certain plotpoints, they just didn't come across in the film. I realise I gave this film a very low mark and believe me I was expecting to like it far more than I did after seeing the excellent trailer but even now a few days later, a reappraisal on DVD/Blu Ray seems unlikely.

I will agree though, I think Paddy could be a great force in British cinema as a director, I think he just needs to be directing something which is not his own work... he also mentioned at the Q&A that he's already got a second film underway, I just hope it's someone else's work because i'd love to see what he could do with say a book adaptation/another person's idea.

Out of interest, Brian Cox (Manhunter/X-Men) was sat in the audience at the screening I attended. I'd love to know what he made of the film!? [8|]




adambatman82 -> RE: Sterling debut by Considine (8/10/2011 9:35:09 PM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: losthighway

quote:

For more on this point check out Considine's interview in this months Sight & Sound, where he attacks the accusations of this being a typical slice of Loach-esque British cinema with borderline resentment for the interviewer. Its a great read, and contains more profanities in its two pages than you'd normally find in a whole year of S&S


I think this was my main issue with the film... i was dying to hear what the point of the film was and whilst explaining about the community aspect mentioned in my review, he also stated this very same point about it not being a 'Loach-esque' film... but imho, it was! I didn't see anything new. You mention Ratcatcher but Tyrannosaur wasn't like that film either (again imo). It fell firmly into a kitchen sink drama by numbers formula and didn't budge from start to finish.


So what makes you think that? It doesn't follow any of the technical rules of social realism for a start (Considine insisted that every shot be filmed on a tripod for one, foregoing the traditional handheld aesthetics of that particular cinéma verité school of filmmaking). Similarly he never attempts to respond to the social issues raised in the film; they simply exist and are there for the duration, he doesn't attempt to solve any of the problems, instead choosing to tell a story ground in their respective situations.

I also disagree with your assertion that it "didn't budge from start to finish", specifically because there were two major shifts in the narrative.




Big Braveheart -> Oscar? (8/10/2011 9:50:48 PM)

Peter Mullan for best actor Oscar possibly? You never know!!




losthighway -> RE: Sterling debut by Considine (8/10/2011 10:29:20 PM)

quote:

ORIGINAL: adambatman82


quote:

ORIGINAL: losthighway

quote:

For more on this point check out Considine's interview in this months Sight & Sound, where he attacks the accusations of this being a typical slice of Loach-esque British cinema with borderline resentment for the interviewer. Its a great read, and contains more profanities in its two pages than you'd normally find in a whole year of S&S


I think this was my main issue with the film... i was dying to hear what the point of the film was and whilst explaining about the community aspect mentioned in my review, he also stated this very same point about it not being a 'Loach-esque' film... but imho, it was! I didn't see anything new. You mention Ratcatcher but Tyrannosaur wasn't like that film either (again imo). It fell firmly into a kitchen sink drama by numbers formula and didn't budge from start to finish.


So what makes you think that? It doesn't follow any of the technical rules of social realism for a start (Considine insisted that every shot be filmed on a tripod for one, foregoing the traditional handheld aesthetics of that particular cinéma verité school of filmmaking). Similarly he never attempts to respond to the social issues raised in the film; they simply exist and are there for the duration, he doesn't attempt to solve any of the problems, instead choosing to tell a story ground in their respective situations.

I also disagree with your assertion that it "didn't budge from start to finish", specifically because there were two major shifts in the narrative.


It's just the feeling I got as I watched the film. I felt like this style of story had all been done before and a lot better. It was steeped in social realism (regardless of the filming techniques)... Paddy said himself he wanted to convey the characters and feel of the Leeds estate it was set within in - even down to copying how one guy walks his dog!

As for the shifts... these being the pub scene and final scene you're referring to i'm guessing? Again, the final scene felt tacked on and the pub scene was a montage which felt cliched. I really wish i'd like Tyrannosaur more... it's not even that i went in with high expectations, it was just how I felt afterwards.




adambatman82 -> RE: Sterling debut by Considine (9/10/2011 12:06:01 AM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: losthighway

It's just the feeling I got as I watched the film. I felt like this style of story had all been done before and a lot better. It was steeped in social realism (regardless of the filming techniques)...



How can it be "steeped in social realism" when it avoids the technical tropes of that particular style of filmmaking? You keep saying that its social realism, but don't say why.

quote:


As for the shifts... these being the pub scene and final scene you're referring to i'm guessing?


Nah, I was referring to the scene at the house and a more subtle moment earlier, which I don't want to mention for fear of spoiler for others. Both mark distinct shifts in the tone of the film.




Spaldron -> RE: Oscar? (9/10/2011 3:58:51 AM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: Big Braveheart

Peter Mullan for best actor Oscar possibly? You never know!!


No chance, the Oscars usually always ignore low key films like this. In fact I'd be surprised if this ever gets a US release. But speaking of awards if there's any justice the BAFTA for Best Actress will go to Olivia Coleman. Although chances are it'll go to Meryl 'fucking' Streep for playing Maggie 'cunting' Thatcher. [:@][:@][:@]




losthighway -> RE: Sterling debut by Considine (9/10/2011 10:32:12 AM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: adambatman82


quote:

ORIGINAL: losthighway

It's just the feeling I got as I watched the film. I felt like this style of story had all been done before and a lot better. It was steeped in social realism (regardless of the filming techniques)...



How can it be "steeped in social realism" when it avoids the technical tropes of that particular style of filmmaking? You keep saying that its social realism, but don't say why.

quote:


As for the shifts... these being the pub scene and final scene you're referring to i'm guessing?


Nah, I was referring to the scene at the house and a more subtle moment earlier, which I don't want to mention for fear of spoiler for others. Both mark distinct shifts in the tone of the film.


A film doesn't have to follow the conventions of a filmmaking style to still present social realism... as for why... the class struggles shown, the drinking friend of Cullan's and his various comments, the bloke with the dog and the lad's mother, even down to the hen party picking the central female character up off the street, etc, etc...




adambatman82 -> RE: Sterling debut by Considine (9/10/2011 11:14:26 AM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: losthighway

A film doesn't have to follow the conventions of a filmmaking style to still present social realism...


Yes it does, social realism is a style of filmmaking.

quote:


as for why... the class struggles shown, the drinking friend of Cullan's and his various comments, the bloke with the dog and the lad's mother, even down to the hen party picking the central female character up off the street, etc, etc...


Those may be things that happen in the film, but they are not presented in the manner in which one would usually find them to be presented in the tradition of a social realist film.

The issues are never presented in a socially responsible manner, ala Rosselini, Loach, et al. They're far more in tune with the traditions of the Poetic Realists, which too presented the real, except with a focus on the style of the film over the subtext. It's told in a manner akin to "recreated realism" as opposed to the documentary infused stylings of Social Realism, and is far more in tune with Renoir, Carne and Duvivier than any one one could cite from the social realist side of the fence.




losthighway -> RE: Sterling debut by Considine (9/10/2011 12:38:00 PM)

quote:

Yes it does, social realism is a style of filmmaking.


We'll have to agree to disagree there Adam... You are referring to a specfic style of filmmaking (in this case a British aesthetic), i'm referring to 'social realism' in more general terms and as it could be argued as being culturally specific, of course a film can present it whilst not adhering to one particular style. As regards your other points, it's interesting you mention the documentary style which I can concede Tyrannosaur does not incoorporate but then again neither did Loach's Sweet Sixteen/Ae Fond Kiss.







adambatman82 -> RE: Sterling debut by Considine (9/10/2011 5:34:41 PM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: losthighway

quote:

Yes it does, social realism is a style of filmmaking.


We'll have to agree to disagree there Adam... You are referring to a specfic style of filmmaking (in this case a British aesthetic), i'm referring to 'social realism' in more general terms and as it could be argued as being culturally specific, of course a film can present it whilst not adhering to one particular style. As regards your other points, it's interesting you mention the documentary style which I can concede Tyrannosaur does not incoorporate but then again neither did Loach's Sweet Sixteen/Ae Fond Kiss.



There's nothing really to disagree on though. Films made in the social realist tradition are produced to a certain set of codes or markers. Tyrannosaur doesn't hit those beats, on both an aesthetic level and from a content perspective.

Taking the wikipedia definition of what Social Realism is, simply because wiki provides a standardised account, and placing Tyrannosaur against that barometer exposes the differences.

"With a new sense of social consciousness, the Social Realists pledged to “fight the beautiful art”, any style which appealed to the eye or emotions. They focused on the ugly realities of contemporary life and sympathized with working-class people, particularly the poor. They recorded what they saw (“as it existed”) in a dispassionate manner. "

The bit I've bolded is the key point. Thats not what Considine is doing with Tyrannosaur.

Tyrannosaur is tonally far closer to the traditions of Poetic realism, with its hyper-real walking metaphors for characters. Sure, its inspired by the real, but thats not the films chief concern.




Pipkin3 -> Cinemas (10/10/2011 12:40:51 AM)

Typical. I really want to see this but doesn't appear to be on anywhere outside bloody London!




ChudMonkey -> RE: Sterling debut by Considine (12/10/2011 10:25:44 AM)

Saw this majestic film last night and feel KN is a bit harsh not giving it the full 5 stars. This plus Kill List are in my top 5 movies of the year so far showing British cinema at its very very best (not seen Submarine yet but I reckon it'll sneak in there too). Outstanding performances throughout and Olivia Colman should be up for an Oscar just for the scene where Eddie Marsan cries into her lap whilst she whispers "I love you too" through one of the most beautifully pained expressions I've ever seen on film - powerful stuff

I'm gonna have to go see it again - its just that good

5 out of 5




thetruth -> RE: Sterling debut by Considine (13/10/2011 4:06:24 PM)

Amazing film.
It does make Leigh look like Disney at times,but it is also unfair to say it is utterly miserable.
This is at times hard to watch,but that is a credit to the superb cast.
It confronts us with the monster inside people and why they are the way they are.Some seem more obvious than others,others more complex than you´d think.
The violence is savage at times,but brutally realistic.
This is British cinema at its finest.




moehat -> RE: Sterling debut by Considine (19/10/2011 11:32:37 PM)

I almost didn't want to see this film, but think it's the best I've seen this year. Left the cinema feeling absolutely numb; the acting was superb and, bleak as the film was there was a warmth and humour to it at times. Annoyingly Paddy Consadine did a Q&A session at my cinema when it was first released [he and Shane Meadows are local boys] but I was away at the time.




NinjaShortbread212 -> RE: Sterling debut by Considine (19/10/2011 11:39:49 PM)

This ^ [:)]

I agree with you when you say you "Left the cinema feeling absolutely numb". Tyrannosaur definitely leaves an impression on you, like a dark cloud almost and not in a bad way either.
I'm a big fan of Shane Meadows and Mike Leigh and this film definitely falls into the "Kitchen Sink" branding. As I'm sure I've said before but hey, I'll say it again - definitely worth a watch!




moehat -> RE: Sterling debut by Considine (20/10/2011 7:46:37 PM)

I suppose, in retrospect, there were things about the film where you could argue that some things were implausible or out of character, but that doesn't really matter to me because it didn't matter while I was watching it [and that's what a film is all about]. And, I had no idea what was going to happen. See, I'm still thinking about it 24 hours later; sign of a good film imo!




NinjaShortbread212 -> RE: Sterling debut by Considine (21/10/2011 2:20:24 AM)

quote:

ORIGINAL: moehat

See, I'm still thinking about it 24 hours later; sign of a good film imo!



Indeed. [:)]




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