RE: olaf and pigeon army present radiothread: a thread about radiohead (Full Version)

All Forums >> [On Another Note...] >> Audiophile



Message


matty_b -> RE: olaf and pigeon army present radiothread: a thread about radiohead (28/12/2011 5:10:43 PM)

Superb choice.

Not one I'd listen to on Christmas morning, however. [:D]




Rinc -> RE: olaf and pigeon army present radiothread: a thread about radiohead (28/12/2011 5:13:58 PM)

An amazing song. Reminds me of decorating my bedroom in 2003. Played the album over and over whilst stripping walls, painting them, putting shelves up and putting furniture together.




Piles -> RE: olaf and pigeon army present radiothread: a thread about radiohead (28/12/2011 11:24:29 PM)

This, Motion Picture Soundtrack and National Anthem are always vying for my favourite from Kid A. Fantastic song from a fantastic album.




paul_ie86 -> RE: olaf and pigeon army present radiothread: a thread about radiohead (29/12/2011 1:58:52 AM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: Pigeon Army

[IMG]http://i1138.photobucket.com/albums/n533/radiothread/pigeonarmy36.png[/IMG]

2000 // From the album 'Kid A'

[image]http://quasherthoughts.files.wordpress.com/2011/01/kida.jpg[/image]


Before somebody points it out (probably Rhubarb because he notices this shit), yes I have backloaded my Radiothread list with ballads to the point where you can't turn without running into a wall of acoustic guitars playing chords that ache with emotion. Tracks like How to Disappear Completely (And Never Be Found Again) are the kind of songs that, in this day and age, Radiohead could do in their sleep if they so wished. They could crank these fuckers out on some kind of mass production line and they'd be millionaires without lifting a finger. That's not to derogate what tracks like How to Disappear Completely are, though - the fact that Radiohead doesn't do that whole figurative production line thing like some highbrow Nickleback says enough about the importance, about the necessity of the existence of songs like this. Radiohead are a notoriously fickle band - tracks can be played live and mixed and remixed for years and never be 'perfect' for them, so the existence of the song is almost like a seal of approval. We think you should listen to this. We've poured everything into it. It deserves to be a Radiohead song.

Using as a springboard some advice given to Thom during the mammoth OK Computer Tour of '97 by REM frontman Michael Stipe - "he said, "Pull the shutters down and keep saying, 'I'm not here, this is not happening'"" - How to Disappear Completely is a delicate piece of work. The acoustic guitar, the simple bassline and the fragile strings, fading in and out as if cars passing on a highway, all evoke the emptiness and anxiety of being stuck in a life you can't deal with, of trying to cope with things way beyond anything you've dealt with before and only being able to shut that shit out for seconds, minutes at a time. It's a song about escape, about not being here, about floating down the River Liffey rather than dealing with your problems; but it's also a song about those problems and how they can consume you, how shutting them out instead of dealing with them is basically letting them consume you. You can escape for moments, but the problems - as represented by the throbbing, discordant strings running under the piece (and getting louder near the end) - will always get back to you.





Probably their best song.




Rhubarb -> RE: olaf and pigeon army present radiothread: a thread about radiohead (29/12/2011 2:10:47 AM)

quote:

ORIGINAL: Pigeon Army


Before somebody points it out (probably Rhubarb because he notices this shit), yes I have backloaded my Radiothread list with ballads


Ha! It would be quite futile to complain about there being lots of ballads in a Radiohead thread (indeed Radiothread) though.

I rather like H2DC (as I believe the accepted acronym probably isn't) though, like most of KA its odd listening to it out of the context of the rest of the record.




Olaf -> RE: olaf and pigeon army present radiothread: a thread about radiohead (9/1/2012 5:38:49 PM)

sorry for not updating more you guys. Here's a short one.


[image]http://i1138.photobucket.com/albums/n533/radiothread/olaf35.png[/image]

[image]http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_Z1Wd1LqcWoQ/R1R6_m1B4TI/AAAAAAAAAlA/K3yVoBDvu6c/s320/radiohead_in_rainbows2.jpg[/image]

2007 // from the album 'In Rainbows'

For a band often labelled as miserabilists, Radiohead have a slightly strange sense of humour. '15 Step', the opening track from 2007's 'In Rainbows', is perhaps one of the best examples of this. After all, it's hard to not to think that the band are having an offbeat joke at the expense of our expectations when listening to the track for the first time; after the triumvirate of 'Kid A', 'Amnesiac' and 'Hail To The Thief' led to the band gaining a bit of a reputation for impenetrable computer music with compressed drum beats and abstract lyrics, 'In Rainbows' opens with... er, compressed drum beats and abstract lyrics. But then, the punchline: one of the sweetest guitar melodies the band have ever put to tape, heralding what is widely accepted to be their most accessible record since 'The Bends'. You've been had, quite clearly, and it takes a while to realise. 'Cat got your tongue? / Did your string come undone?'

Indeed, this unexpected sense of the absurd pervades the song in a lot of ways the title in the context of the song ('15 steps / and then a sheer drop') is Wile E Coyote slapstick reincarnated as existential joke, the feeling of running off a cliff without noticing you've gone too far. There's a few lines that could be interpreted as ironic references to the band's reputation in the press following 'Hail To The Thief' ('you used to be alright, what happened? / Et cetera, et cetera'). The unorthodox 5/8 time signature the song employs is immediately reminiscent of the endearingly silly Dave Brubeck classic 'Take Five'. There's even the hilariously incongruous sample of a classroom full of children clapping and cheering. If this is an attempt at being miserabilist, then the band weren't doing a particularly good job of it.

The song's lightness of touch makes it a good opener for 'In Rainbows'; while it's hardly Radiohead's comedy album, for the most part it demonstrates a more laid-back mode for the band both lyrically and musically. (It's likely to be the only RH album to contain a lyric like 'I don't want to be your friend / I just want to be your lover,' for one. Phwoar.) As a move towards a stately, elder-statesmen Radiohead, it's perfectly judged. But as '15 Step' proves, that doesn't mean a bunch of elder statesmen can't have fun.


Listen: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WedRDYmtvX4
A wonderfully fun version from the Grammy awards, with the help of the USC Marching Band: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PyX-Mjaq8Hk




matty_b -> RE: olaf and pigeon army present radiothread: a thread about radiohead (9/1/2012 5:58:38 PM)

I know this is a line easily trotted out in a list of Radiohead songs, but great choice. Fantastic write up, too.




Pigeon Army -> RE: olaf and pigeon army present radiothread: a thread about radiohead (22/1/2012 10:10:02 AM)

[image]http://i1138.photobucket.com/albums/n533/radiothread/pigeonarmy35.png[/image]

2003 // from the album 'Hail to the Thief'

[image]http://watchmojo.com/music/blog/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/hail-to-the-thief.jpg[/image]


Opinions on Hail to the Thief vary. Some feel that Radiohead's sixth album isn't a particularly notable work, a sort of space-filler between Amnesiac and In Rainbows (though among the people who feel that is James Oldham and he writes for NME so that opinion isn't backed by the best minds in music journalism). Others feel that it's an excellent a logical entry in the Radiohead canon at that point in time, a successful attempt at reconciling the hitmaking of The Bends and OK Computer with their more experimental concerns (though that opinion was held by writers for Pitchfork and The Daily Telegraph so, again, grain of salt and all that). The band themselves have voiced their consternation over what the album is and what they felt it should have been - Thom has said that he would do it over again and that "We wanted to do things quickly, and I think the songs suffered. It was part of the experiment"; Ed O'Brien felt the album was too long and should've been around ten tracks total; Colin has suggested that more time should've been taken with it. That's all well and good, but I must take an unpopular stance here and disagree with the band - I think Hail to the Thief is right up there with Amnesiac and Kid A as the best of Radiohead's work, a tightly-structured injection of nervy rock sensibilities mixed in with the dark, experimental material that the band had been playing with since The Bends. It's an album full of amazing tracks that pack a job lot of anxieties and interpersonal violence into three-four minute packages and I wouldn't have it any other way.

A Punchup at a Wedding (No no no no no no no no.) is the first, but by no means the last, entry from that album in this list. The track is layered with distressed instrumentals - opening with percussion that sits halfway between the electronic pulsing of Morning Bell and a more conventional rock drumline, the song soon packs on a piano tune that's mainlining dread and bitterness; a bass line that builds itself up before tumbling down, as though the mere act of making music itself was a Sisyphean task; Yorke's harsh, nasty little whine, attacking a unknown third party as it "piss[es] on our parade" and "ruins it for all concerned"; finally, a grinding electric guitar that's almost the sincerely testy cousin of the dead notes that lead into the chorus in Creep. It's a song that throws a lot of anger and betrayal and disgust into five minutes and it's hard not to empathise with the ill feeling clouding the mind of the song's protagonist (if you can call him/her that).

Listen here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=upJuupWjcx8





Olaf -> RE: olaf and pigeon army present radiothread: a thread about radiohead (28/1/2012 1:50:32 AM)

[image]http://i1138.photobucket.com/albums/n533/radiothread/olaf34.png[/image]

[image]http://www.ateaseweb.com/TKOL2.jpg[/image]

2011 // from the album 'The King of Limbs'

'The King of Limbs', Radiohead's fanbase-dividing eighth album, is the kind of record that doesn't happen often enough: a band eighteen years on from their debut producing something they genuinely haven't done before. While anyone with their ear pointed in the general direction of recent developments in UK  electronic music would be able to point out the influences that abound throughout the LP (a point driven home by the all-star lineup found on 'TKOL RMX 1234567'), much of this album represents uncharted territory for the group. On release, many declared it the work of a band treading water, but really nothing could be further from the truth; for this writer, 'The King of Limbs' is the band's most creative and rewarding effort since 'Kid A', a spooked 37 minutes of uniquely off-centre electronica that owes as much to the rural dread of 'The Wicker Man' as it does the urban melancholy of 'Untrue'. One imagines that 'The King of Limbs' is what Burial would sound like if he was brought up in the deepest woods of Wiltshire rather the urban jungle of South London.

But following 'In Rainbows', Radiohead are not the purveyors of gloom they once were; there's a difficult-to-define emotional ambivalence at the heart of 'The King of Limbs', combined with the somewhat sunnier disposition the previous LP initially suggested at, that makes it a much more haunting experience than a depressing one. The best metaphor I can think of is watching the sun slowly come up, half awake and half asleep, not entirely sure if you just dreamed it all. 'Separator', the album's closer, perfectly captures that moment a syncopated drum beat intertwining with a subtly effective bassline courtesy of Colin Greenwood, Thom Yorke's vocals echoing through the mix with lyrics like 'like I'm falling out of bed from a long and weary dream / finally I'm free of all the weight I've been carrying', before a gorgeous guitar line from Jonny Greenwood comes in halfway through to complete the progression the listener has made from 'Bloom' up to this point. In what is in many ways Radiohead's most pared-down and minimal record (and I'm not just referring to its length), 'Separator' is a wonderfully understated moment of cathartic release.

The split in opinion on the album is unlikely to go away too soon (though who knows, it did for 'Kid A'). It was certainly a shock after the more immediately loveable melodies of 'In Rainbows', but 'The King of Limbs' is for me the better album, and well worth going back to if you haven't done so recently. And despite already gaining a bit of a reputation as one of the band's more 'difficult' records, it has in 'Separator' one of their simplest, loveliest melodies. ('Lovely' is probably not a compliment they get often, admittedly.)


Listen: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F3oRhwOcQ3w
a reworked version From The Basement: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qaVylBJQsro
An equally lovely Four Tet rmx: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fxX4i-_A-MU&feature=relmfu




DARKO_DONNIE_DONUT -> RE: olaf and pigeon army present radiothread: a thread about radiohead (29/1/2012 12:18:27 PM)

quote:

ORIGINAL: Olaf

[image]http://i1138.photobucket.com/albums/n533/radiothread/olaf34.png[/image]

[image]http://www.ateaseweb.com/TKOL2.jpg[/image]

2011 // from the album 'The King of Limbs'

'The King of Limbs', Radiohead's fanbase-dividing eighth album, is the kind of record that doesn't happen often enough: a band eighteen years on from their debut producing something they genuinely haven't done before. While anyone with their ear pointed in the general direction of recent developments in UK  electronic music would be able to point out the influences that abound throughout the LP (a point driven home by the all-star lineup found on 'TKOL RMX 1234567'), much of this album represents uncharted territory for the group. On release, many declared it the work of a band treading water, but really nothing could be further from the truth; for this writer, 'The King of Limbs' is the band's most creative and rewarding effort since 'Kid A', a spooked 37 minutes of uniquely off-centre electronica that owes as much to the rural dread of 'The Wicker Man' as it does the urban melancholy of 'Untrue'. One imagines that 'The King of Limbs' is what Burial would sound like if he was brought up in the deepest woods of Wiltshire rather the urban jungle of South London.

But following 'In Rainbows', Radiohead are not the purveyors of gloom they once were; there's a difficult-to-define emotional ambivalence at the heart of 'The King of Limbs', combined with the somewhat sunnier disposition the previous LP initially suggested at, that makes it a much more haunting experience than a depressing one. The best metaphor I can think of is watching the sun slowly come up, half awake and half asleep, not entirely sure if you just dreamed it all. 'Separator', the album's closer, perfectly captures that moment a syncopated drum beat intertwining with a subtly effective bassline courtesy of Colin Greenwood, Thom Yorke's vocals echoing through the mix with lyrics like 'like I'm falling out of bed from a long and weary dream / finally I'm free of all the weight I've been carrying', before a gorgeous guitar line from Jonny Greenwood comes in halfway through to complete the progression the listener has made from 'Bloom' up to this point. In what is in many ways Radiohead's most pared-down and minimal record (and I'm not just referring to its length), 'Separator' is a wonderfully understated moment of cathartic release.

The split in opinion on the album is unlikely to go away too soon (though who knows, it did for 'Kid A'). It was certainly a shock after the more immediately loveable melodies of 'In Rainbows', but 'The King of Limbs' is for me the better album, and well worth going back to if you haven't done so recently. And despite already gaining a bit of a reputation as one of the band's more 'difficult' records, it has in 'Separator' one of their simplest, loveliest melodies. ('Lovely' is probably not a compliment they get often, admittedly.)


Listen: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F3oRhwOcQ3w
a reworked version From The Basement: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qaVylBJQsro
An equally lovely Four Tet rmx: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fxX4i-_A-MU&feature=relmfu


Great read.
This a  very good album,it really kicks in with 'Lotus flower',though I do like the intro song 'boom'.
Been meaning to see Radiohead live for sometime.[:D]




Olaf -> RE: olaf and pigeon army present radiothread: a thread about radiohead (29/1/2012 7:04:05 PM)

Glad you enjoyed it - one of the things I really love about the album is the split in the middle between Feral and Lotus Flower, while not being too jarring or anything. Not sure which side I prefer but a quick look at my list says I have more from the first half, interestingly (although that said, I've only noticed that I forgot to put Codex in. Doh.) The only song that doesn't really work for me is Morning Mr Magpie, which is the only one that sounds really like something they've done already imo.

PS I haven't seen them live either, shamefully. They really need to stop dragging their feet on 2012 UK/Ireland dates already [:D]




Rinc -> RE: olaf and pigeon army present radiothread: a thread about radiohead (29/1/2012 7:14:01 PM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: Olaf

PS I haven't seen them live either, shamefully.


I've seen them live 3 times. [8D]




Olaf -> RE: olaf and pigeon army present radiothread: a thread about radiohead (29/1/2012 7:15:48 PM)

quote:

ORIGINAL: Rinc


quote:

ORIGINAL: Olaf

PS I haven't seen them live either, shamefully.


I've seen them live 3 times. [8D]



In contrast, I was six years old in 1997. HOW DYA LIKE THAT.




Rinc -> RE: olaf and pigeon army present radiothread: a thread about radiohead (29/1/2012 7:21:22 PM)

I feel for you. You missed out on Italia 90, Euro 96, Britpop and the glory days of Simply Red.




Olaf -> RE: olaf and pigeon army present radiothread: a thread about radiohead (29/1/2012 8:07:47 PM)

My five year old self vaguely remembers Euro 96 because I was living in England at the time. I did get to experience all the same emotions (ie ARGGG FUCKN PENALTIES) during France 98 though so it was grand. As for Italia 90, I think they show Packie Bonner saving that penalty more often than anything the national team has done in the last ten years so I tend to feel like I was there.

quote:

ORIGINAL: Rinc

the glory days of Simply Red.


[:D]




sharkboy -> RE: olaf and pigeon army present radiothread: a thread about radiohead (2/2/2012 10:31:28 AM)

Ahh...1997...possibly my favourite year in terms of Radiohead.  OK Computer was everywhere, my band were slowly turning into a Radiohead tribute band (about 12 of their songs in the set!), and I'd got tickets to see them play in Dublin, supported by Teenage Fanclub and Massive Attack.  Then, best of all, rumours started circulating about a secret gig in Belfast a couple of days before their Dublin appearance.  So, on the off chance it was true, I got the first train into the city centre and walked round to Our Price Records, outside of which a substantial queue was already starting to form.  A few hours later, I walked into work with 2 tickets to see Radiohead in the Mandela Hall at Queens University, a tiny venue that wouldn't hold more than a few hundred at full capacity, and what an amazing gig it was too!

Anyway, back to the list since I've missed the last few.  All great choices so far guys (you've never really heard How to Disappear Completely until you've heard it at a gig in Dublin - the massive cheer that always erupts after the line "I float down the Liffey" is great!).  Nice to see HTTT getting some love too - I've always thought this album was cruelly overelooked at times.




OPEN YOUR EYES -> RE: olaf and pigeon army present radiothread: a thread about radiohead (16/2/2012 10:36:52 AM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: Rinc


quote:

ORIGINAL: Olaf

PS I haven't seen them live either, shamefully.


I've seen them live 3 times. [8D]



I hear they are doing a new tour?
about time too...[:D]




Drew_231 -> RE: olaf and pigeon army present radiothread: a thread about radiohead (17/2/2012 7:38:57 AM)

quote:

ORIGINAL: Olaf

[image]http://i1138.photobucket.com/albums/n533/radiothread/olaf34.png[/image]

[image]http://www.ateaseweb.com/TKOL2.jpg[/image]

2011 // from the album 'The King of Limbs'

'The King of Limbs', Radiohead's fanbase-dividing eighth album, is the kind of record that doesn't happen often enough: a band eighteen years on from their debut producing something they genuinely haven't done before. While anyone with their ear pointed in the general direction of recent developments in UK  electronic music would be able to point out the influences that abound throughout the LP (a point driven home by the all-star lineup found on 'TKOL RMX 1234567'), much of this album represents uncharted territory for the group. On release, many declared it the work of a band treading water, but really nothing could be further from the truth; for this writer, 'The King of Limbs' is the band's most creative and rewarding effort since 'Kid A', a spooked 37 minutes of uniquely off-centre electronica that owes as much to the rural dread of 'The Wicker Man' as it does the urban melancholy of 'Untrue'. One imagines that 'The King of Limbs' is what Burial would sound like if he was brought up in the deepest woods of Wiltshire rather the urban jungle of South London.

But following 'In Rainbows', Radiohead are not the purveyors of gloom they once were; there's a difficult-to-define emotional ambivalence at the heart of 'The King of Limbs', combined with the somewhat sunnier disposition the previous LP initially suggested at, that makes it a much more haunting experience than a depressing one. The best metaphor I can think of is watching the sun slowly come up, half awake and half asleep, not entirely sure if you just dreamed it all. 'Separator', the album's closer, perfectly captures that moment a syncopated drum beat intertwining with a subtly effective bassline courtesy of Colin Greenwood, Thom Yorke's vocals echoing through the mix with lyrics like 'like I'm falling out of bed from a long and weary dream / finally I'm free of all the weight I've been carrying', before a gorgeous guitar line from Jonny Greenwood comes in halfway through to complete the progression the listener has made from 'Bloom' up to this point. In what is in many ways Radiohead's most pared-down and minimal record (and I'm not just referring to its length), 'Separator' is a wonderfully understated moment of cathartic release.

The split in opinion on the album is unlikely to go away too soon (though who knows, it did for 'Kid A'). It was certainly a shock after the more immediately loveable melodies of 'In Rainbows', but 'The King of Limbs' is for me the better album, and well worth going back to if you haven't done so recently. And despite already gaining a bit of a reputation as one of the band's more 'difficult' records, it has in 'Separator' one of their simplest, loveliest melodies. ('Lovely' is probably not a compliment they get often, admittedly.)


Listen: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F3oRhwOcQ3w
a reworked version From The Basement: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qaVylBJQsro
An equally lovely Four Tet rmx: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fxX4i-_A-MU&feature=relmfu


Great write up, and while I do prefer 'In Rainbows', as its my favourite Radiohead album, 'TKOL' has just grown and grown in my estimation.
Its probably, of all their albums, the one that gets in you're head and stays there the most. Its also their strongest album in terms of length and flow, not a second is wasted throughout the whole thing.
For me, Little by Little and Give up the Ghost are the two best songs, so hope to see them make an appearance in the list




Goodfella -> RE: olaf and pigeon army present radiothread: a thread about radiohead (23/2/2012 9:11:31 PM)

I've never listened to a Radiohead track in my life. Does this make me a bad person?




Rinc -> RE: olaf and pigeon army present radiothread: a thread about radiohead (23/2/2012 9:23:58 PM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: Goodfella

I've never listened to a Radiohead track in my life. Does this make me a bad person?


It makes you the worst person alive




horribleives -> RE: olaf and pigeon army present radiothread: a thread about radiohead (23/2/2012 9:26:30 PM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: Goodfella

I've never listened to a Radiohead track in my life. Does this make me a bad person?


I bet you have, even if you don't realise it. Ever seen Clueless? Romeo and Juliet? That episode of The Sopranos where Meadow has a party at her granny's house? Erm, several others that I can't think of right now.




Olaf -> RE: olaf and pigeon army present radiothread: a thread about radiohead (23/2/2012 9:37:12 PM)

The episode of Father Ted with Tommy Tiernan. Best use of Radiohead in a tv show ever.

Also, I will do a new entry soon when I get a chance. It just misses out on 1997 (I loved your post Sharky!), but it is a mid-90s number.
(@Drew: interesting point about the length of it. A part of me thinks HTTT could have been at least in the band's top three/four albums if it was shorter, whereas TKOL is their best paced album since Kid A for me. On the other hand, Morning Mr Magpie is 1/8th of the album whereas, say, Electioneering is only 1/12th of OKC.)




Goodfella -> RE: olaf and pigeon army present radiothread: a thread about radiohead (23/2/2012 10:29:35 PM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: horribleives


quote:

ORIGINAL: Goodfella

I've never listened to a Radiohead track in my life. Does this make me a bad person?


I bet you have, even if you don't realise it. Ever seen Clueless? Romeo and Juliet? That episode of The Sopranos where Meadow has a party at her granny's house? Erm, several others that I can't think of right now.


Which R&J, the Baz Luhrman one? I've seen all of The Sopranos so yeah, I guess you're right, I've just never knowingly listened to one, I probably should though. What's an ideal reccomendation for a first-time listener folks?




Rhubarb -> RE: olaf and pigeon army present radiothread: a thread about radiohead (23/2/2012 11:03:49 PM)

The Bends is the album to start with, I would say, then if you like it progress chronologically as it gets weirder/more interesting depending on your taste.




Goodfella -> RE: olaf and pigeon army present radiothread: a thread about radiohead (24/2/2012 12:08:33 AM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: Rhubarb

The Bends is the album to start with, I would say, then if you like it progress chronologically as it gets weirder/more interesting depending on your taste.


Cheers, I will definitely try them, I hear many good things, I wouldn't say what I've heard is likely to be my taste but I'll give anything a go once.

Btw Rhubarb, I'm not usually one for blogs and whatnot and what people keep in their signatures, but I thought I'd have a looksie at yours and I like your website man, I agree with your review of 'The Iron Lady' heartily and you've reminded me I need to watch 'Young Adult.' Good stuff, you've already eclipsed Total Film by about two decades![:)]




vad3r -> RE: olaf and pigeon army present radiothread: a thread about radiohead (24/2/2012 12:22:48 AM)

Start here:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M_wGLZmwZ8o

Radiohead's greatest song/live performance.




Rhubarb -> RE: olaf and pigeon army present radiothread: a thread about radiohead (24/2/2012 1:45:28 AM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: Goodfella


quote:

ORIGINAL: Rhubarb

The Bends is the album to start with, I would say, then if you like it progress chronologically as it gets weirder/more interesting depending on your taste.


Cheers, I will definitely try them, I hear many good things, I wouldn't say what I've heard is likely to be my taste but I'll give anything a go once.

Btw Rhubarb, I'm not usually one for blogs and whatnot and what people keep in their signatures, but I thought I'd have a looksie at yours and I like your website man, I agree with your review of 'The Iron Lady' heartily and you've reminded me I need to watch 'Young Adult.' Good stuff, you've already eclipsed Total Film by about two decades![:)]


Thanks, that's really cool of you to say. I should update it more often really.




Goodfella -> RE: olaf and pigeon army present radiothread: a thread about radiohead (24/2/2012 2:10:14 AM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: Rhubarb


quote:

ORIGINAL: Goodfella


quote:

ORIGINAL: Rhubarb

The Bends is the album to start with, I would say, then if you like it progress chronologically as it gets weirder/more interesting depending on your taste.


Cheers, I will definitely try them, I hear many good things, I wouldn't say what I've heard is likely to be my taste but I'll give anything a go once.

Btw Rhubarb, I'm not usually one for blogs and whatnot and what people keep in their signatures, but I thought I'd have a looksie at yours and I like your website man, I agree with your review of 'The Iron Lady' heartily and you've reminded me I need to watch 'Young Adult.' Good stuff, you've already eclipsed Total Film by about two decades![:)]


Thanks, that's really cool of you to say. I should update it more often really.



No probs. Yeah, should do, it's a good stuff, it's inspired me to look down that road again to be honest, but with cricket, not films or music I'm afraid.[:D]




Rhubarb -> RE: olaf and pigeon army present radiothread: a thread about radiohead (24/2/2012 2:21:43 AM)

To be fair, that's probably a fractionally less crowded market [:D]




Goodfella -> RE: olaf and pigeon army present radiothread: a thread about radiohead (24/2/2012 2:38:40 AM)


quote:

ORIGINAL: Rhubarb

To be fair, that's probably a fractionally less crowded market [:D]


You're being too kind there, you really are.[:D] I could e-mail the link out to my three cricket supporting friends down here and I will have covered those likely to read from local townships within a 50 mile radius.[:D]

I notice stuff about Muse v Radiohead in this thread. I like Muse, I don't love Muse, not like people down here who because they are from Teignmouth, have a near orgasm anytime a track of their's comes on in the pub. I prefer their older stuf, I didn't really like the last album, and Matt Bellamy has always struck me as an unusual character. Radiohead have been around for a lot longer though haven't they? I seem to remember my Uncle having a collection of Radiohead CDs when I couldn't have been any older than 10 or 11 and that was 15 years ago.




Page: <<   < prev  1 2 3 [4] 5   next >   >>

Valid CSS!




Forum Software © ASPPlayground.NET Advanced Edition 2.4.5 ANSI
0.125