The Empire Forum's 100 Favourite Works of Fiction Results (Full Version)

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Rhubarb -> The Empire Forum's 100 Favourite Works of Fiction Results (7/6/2011 3:42:59 PM)

The Empire Forum's 100 Favourite Works of Fiction

After all the arguing about how many books to put in the list, about which books to put in, the quiet deluge i received in my PM inbox right as the vote was closing, its here, the results to the works of fiction you have chosen as the greatest of all time.

I'll do the results in here, book by book, i guess we should keep talk in other thread so its a bit tidier, but please, lets talk about it al ot. Its quite exciting.




Rhubarb -> RE: The Empire Forum's 100 Favourite Works of Fiction Results (7/6/2011 4:06:30 PM)

100. To The Lighthouse - Virginia Woolf (1927) Novel

[image]http://covers.booktopia.com.au/big/978009/947/9780099478294.jpg[/image]

What it is: Virginia Woolf's partly-autobiographical modernist novel as a study of domestic psychology, light on plot and dialogue, big on introspection and philosophical musing.

Adapted?: For TV with Kenneth Brannagh taking a rare break from Shakespeare, and by Patrick Wolf in the form of song.

From the Text: "...What is the meaning of life? That was all ó a simple question; one that tended to close in on one with years. The great revelation had never come. The great revelation perhaps never did come. Instead there were little daily miracles, illuminations, matches struck unexpectedly in the dark; here was one. This, that, and the other..."

A Critic Writes: ""The Significance of Author Woolf's last novel was that her 'stream of consciousness' method was not only startlingly original but startlingly successful as well"

Amazon/Wikipedia




Rhubarb -> RE: The Empire Forum's 100 Favourite Works of Fiction Results (7/6/2011 4:30:38 PM)

99 The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman - Laurence Sterne (1759) Novel

[image]http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51KE1A3h1LL.jpg[/image]

What it is: Sterne's comic masterpiece, which concerns the autobiography of the fictional Shandy, a charachter so determined to veer of course that he barely reaches his birth.

Adapted? As opera by Michael Nyman, and Micheal Winterbottom did an appropriately meta film version about the filming of the unfilmable novel with Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon

From the Text: "I wish either my father or my mother, or indeed both of them, as they were in duty both equally bound to it, had minded what they were about when they begot me."

A Critic Writes: "Nothing odd will do long. Tristram Shandy did not last." (Samuel Johnson)

Amazon/Wikipedia




Rhubarb -> RE: The Empire Forum's 100 Favourite Works of Fiction Results (8/6/2011 2:17:09 PM)

98 Moby Dick - Herman Melville (1851) Novel

[image]http://covers.openlibrary.org/b/id/2319757-L.jpg[/image]

What it is: The great American novel about some men, a boat and an enigmatic whale.

Adapted? So many times the adaptations have their own Wikipedia page. From a silent movie version, through Orson Welles lost version, to Age of the Dragons, which is Moby Dick, but with dragons. Also on TV and the stage and radio dozens of times.

From the Text: "Of all mortals, some dying men are the most tyrannical; and certainly, since they will shortly trouble us so little for evermore, the poor fellows ought to be indulged."

A Critic Writes: "I can assure you Ernest Hemingway was wrong when he said modern American literature began with Huckleberry Finn. It begins with Moby-Dick, the book that swallowed European civilization whole" (Edgar Lawrence Doctorow)

Amazon/Wikipedia




Rhubarb -> RE: The Empire Forum's 100 Favourite Works of Fiction Results (8/6/2011 2:32:58 PM)

97 - The Mr Men Series - Roger Hargreaves (1971) Series of Novels

[image]http://covers.openlibrary.org/b/id/2750567-L.jpg[/image]

What it is: Beloved series of childrens books, with various characters with one-dimensional personalities based on their names.

Adapted? For televisoin. Not always entirely successfully, I might add.

From the Text: "Mr Lazy lives in Sleepyland, which is a very lazy looking and sleepylike place."

A Critic Writes "This book cleverly juxtaposes the subliminal metaphorical sadness of the blueness of the title character's skin, with the author's underlying trauma clearly visible in his usage of text and plot. A tear-wrenching book, only for those strong-hearted." (Peter Harrison)

Amazon/Wikipedia




Rhubarb -> RE: The Empire Forum's 100 Favourite Works of Fiction Results (8/6/2011 2:51:47 PM)

96. The BFG - Roald Dahl (1982) Novel

[image]http://davidlopez85.files.wordpress.com/2011/05/519qxmcxfpl.jpg[/image]

What it is: Evergreen children's story about one giant who comes along and blows dreams into children's rooms, who is bullied by even bigger giants who steal children for food.

Adapted? : Into an unsatisfying cartoon with David Jason.

From the Text "What I mean and what I say is two different things,' the BFG announced rather grandly."

A Critic Writes: The BFG is one of Dahl's most lovable character creations. Whether galloping off with Sophie nestled into the soft skin of his ear to capture dreams as though they were exotic butterflies; speaking his delightful, jumbled, squib-fangled patois; or whizzpopping for the Queen, he leaves an indelible impression of bigheartedness (Susan Harrison)

Amazon/Wikipedia




Rhubarb -> RE: The Empire Forum's 100 Favourite Works of Fiction Results (9/6/2011 2:11:02 PM)

95 Naked Lunch - William Burroughs (1959) Novel

[image]http://powdalounge.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/11/naked-lunch.jpg[/image]

What It Is: A series of connected, partly autobiographical vignettes, designed to be read in any order you like.

Adapted? Was once going to adapted as a musical starring Mick Jagger (!) but fell through. Eventually loosely adapted by David Cronenberg.

From the Text: "Bureaucracy is wrong as a cancer, a turning away from the human evolutionary direction of infinite potentials and differentiation and independent spontaneous action to the complete parasitism of a virus....Bureaus die when the structure of the state collapse. They are as helpless and unfit for independent existence as a displaced tapeworm, or a virus that has killed the host."

A Critic Writes: "an absolutely devastating ridicule of all that is false, primitive, and vicious in current American life". (Terry Southern)

Amazon/Wikipedia




Rhubarb -> RE: The Empire Forum's 100 Favourite Works of Fiction Results (9/6/2011 2:24:23 PM)

94 Girlfriend in a Coma - Douglas Coupland (1998) Novel

[image]http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-AaGpdq16xvE/TdBqgZ3AffI/AAAAAAAABTA/wkJTTHvHXZ4/s1600/get-novels.jpg[/image]

What it is: Where Coupland got metaphsyical - a teenage girl writes that she wants to sleep for a thousand years before promptly falling into a coma.While her frineds try to cope with their lives, they grow up, she wakes up and then the world ends.

Adapted? Only on the Radio so far, despite being perhaps the most obviously cinematic of Coupland's work.

From the Text: "At twenty you know you're not going to be a rock star... by twenty-five you know you're not going to be a dentist or a professional... by thirty, a darkness starts moving in - you wonder if you're ever going to be fulfilled, let alone wealthy or successful... by thirty-five, you know, basically, what you're going to be doing the rest of your life; you become resigned to your fate."

A Critic Writes: "That Karen sees the world with eyes that were last open in 1979 is itself a master-stroke, and one that will resonate particularly with British readers, who, more than most, recognize 1979 as the Beginning of the End". (Nicholas Lizad)

Amazon/Wikipedia




Rhubarb -> RE: The Empire Forum's 100 Favourite Works of Fiction Results (13/6/2011 4:01:37 PM)

93 The Sandman - Neil Gaiman (1989) Comic Series

[image]http://dreamusher.com/sandman/wp-content/uploads/2010/03/sandman_vol1_preludes.jpg[/image]

What It Is: The adventure of Dream, Lord of the Dreams, who is captured and held hostage while his kingdom falls into ruins, he escapes and returns to rebuild it.

Adapted? A film has version has been stuck in development hell for nearly twenty years.

From the Text: "Do you know what Freud said about dreams of flying? It means you're really dreaming about having sex."
"Indeed? Tell me, then, what does it mean when you dream about having sex?"

A Critic Writes: "...a comic book for intellectuals" (Norman Mailer)

Amazon/Wikipedia




Rhubarb -> RE: The Empire Forum's 100 Favourite Works of Fiction Results (13/6/2011 4:13:18 PM)

92. The Wasp Factory - Iain Banks (1984) Novel

[image]http://ijustreadaboutthat.files.wordpress.com/2010/09/wassp.jpg[/image]

What It Is: Your bog standard fictional memoir, you know, hurting animals, killing children, inventing weird rituals, that kind of thing.

Adapted? Nope.

From the Text: "...Well, people are stupid, but it all seems to have more to do with mood, caprice and atmosphere than carefully thought-out arguments. I can feel the same sort of thing going on in my head. Sometimes the thoughts and feelings I had didnít really agree with each other, so I decided I must be lots of different people inside my brain"

A Critic Writes: "a work of unparalleled depravity." (Irish Times)

Wikipedia/Amazon





Rhubarb -> RE: The Empire Forum's 100 Favourite Works of Fiction Results (13/6/2011 4:29:39 PM)

91. Generation X: Tales for an Accelerated Culture - Douglas Coupland (1991) Novel

[image]http://29.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_l0fubrJRxm1qzvsijo1_400.jpg[/image]

What it Is: A Sign of the times address, framed as a slacker Canterbury Tales as three dropouts from society tell each other stories from their lives, inventing a whole new popular vernacular while they're at it.

Adapted? Not as of yet. Probably on the radio, ask Rawls.

From the Text: "McJob - a low-pay, low-prestige, low-dignity, low-benefit, no-future job in the service sector. Frequently considered a satisfying career choice by people who have never held one."

A Critic Writes:" what initially seems like a selfish complaint about graduate life at the fag-end of Reganism starts to take on wider significance. It's a quiet meditation on transience, futility, forging a personal morality. It's also an entertainingly raucous look at how to have fun in the face of such concerns" (Sam Jordison)

Amazon/Wikipedia




Rhubarb -> RE: The Empire Forum's 100 Favourite Works of Fiction Results (13/6/2011 4:45:34 PM)

90 It - Stephen King (1986) Novel

[image]http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-0_6mrS4uAVA/Tb8ozaufqYI/AAAAAAAAABY/MM0n3SJrpC8/s1600/king-it.jpg[/image]

What it Is: A shapeshifting being from another dimension scares some small children, most iconically in the form of a clown. They come back years later to face the fear.

Adapted? in 1990 for TV, Warner Bros are trying to get a new film version out there at the moment.

From the Text "Maybe, he thought, there aren't any such things as good or bad friends - maybe there are just friends, people who stand by you when you're hurt and who help you feel not so lonely. Maybe they're always worth being scared for, and hoping for, and living for. Maybe worth dying for, too, if that's what has to be"

A Critic Writes: "It needs editing" (Illumnati blog)

Wikipedia/Amazon




Rhubarb -> RE: The Empire Forum's 100 Favourite Works of Fiction Results (15/6/2011 11:25:20 PM)

89 Gravity's Rainbow - Thomas Pynchon (1973) Novel

[image]http://28.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_l2kusnK54O1qaouh8o1_400.jpg[/image]

What it is: Pynchon's digressive WW2 set magnum opus, with 400 characters and 900 pages, its tough to know where to begin really. Oh wait, Amazon has the answer: Tyrone Slothrop, a GI in London in 1944, has a big problem. Whenever he gets an erection, a Blitz bomb hits. Slothrop gets excited, and then "a screaming comes across the sky".

Adapted? PrŁfstand VII is apparently a lose film adaptation. In song, by Klaxons. Devo's Whip It is also apparently influenced by the book.

From the Text: "It means this War was never political at all, the politics was all theatre, all just to keep the people distracted...secretly, it was being dictated instead by the needs of technology...by a conspiracy between human beings and techniques, by something that needed the energy-burst of war."

A Critic Writes: "No, it is not unreadable. For most of its 700-plus pages it's so crazily, scarily, sumptuously readable that you hate to put it aside even as the last paragraph thunders down on your head." (Richard Lacayo)

Amazon/Wikipedia




Rhubarb -> RE: The Empire Forum's 100 Favourite Works of Fiction Results (15/6/2011 11:42:42 PM)

88 The Shining - Stephen King (1977) Novel


[image]http://photo.goodreads.com/books/1249804065l/11588.jpg[/image]

What is it: A small boy with a magical ability, his alcoholic dad and strong mother all head off to a creepy hotel for a bit. What could go wrong?

Adapted? Famously by Stanley Kubrick into a horror classic, and then less famously by Stephen King who was unhappy with Kubrick's version.

From the Text: 'Any big hotels have got scandals,' he said. 'Just like every big hotel has got a ghost. Why? Hell, people come and go."

A Critic Writes: "A climax that is literally explosive" (Cosmopolitan)

Amazon/Wikipedia




Rhubarb -> RE: The Empire Forum's 100 Favourite Works of Fiction Results (21/6/2011 12:03:06 AM)

87 White Noise - Don DeLillo (1985) Novel

[image]http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/31mTeQ1tTDL.jpg[/image]

What it is: A study of the fear of death, via a expert on Hitler and a chemical spillage.

Adapted? According to Wikipedia it was once being prepped as a film adap, but has since dissapeared from view.

From the Text: "I donít trust anybodyís nostalgia but my own. Nostalgia is a product of dissatisfaction and rage. Itís a settling of grievances between the present and the past. The more powerful the nostalgia, the closer you come to violence. War is the form nostalgia takes when men are hard-pressed to say something good about their country"

A Critic Writes: Though it's pitched at a level of absurdity slightly above that of real life, White Noise captures the quality of daily existence in media-saturated, hyper-capitalistic postmodern America so precisely, you don't know whether to laugh or whimper.(Lev Grossman)

Amazon/Wikipedia




Rhubarb -> RE: The Empire Forum's 100 Favourite Works of Fiction Results (21/6/2011 12:21:17 AM)

86. Jean de Florrette/Manon des Sources - Marcel Pagnol (1964) Novel(s)

[image]http://photo.goodreads.com/books/1172809242l/220331.jpg[/image]

What it is: French language phenomena about some farmers tricking an outsider to leave his house.

Adapted? Why, yes. In fact, the film is so famous that it has a Wikipedia page in English, and the actual novel does not.

From the text: "Bonjour ! Je sais you' ; nouveau re ici, mais si vous quitteriez juste votre maison, lui serait grand"

A Critic Writes: "Ce livre il est fantastique ! J'aime ce livre. Les fermiers se sentent juste si vrai vous pour savoir ? Je ne pourrais pas le mettre vers le bas."

Amazon/No Wikipedia





Rhubarb -> RE: The Empire Forum's 100 Favourite Works of Fiction Results (27/6/2011 1:55:57 PM)

85. LA Confidential - James Ellroy (1990) Novel

[image]http://jamesellroy.net/images/cache/48cff158c5138c472368363c9f331a5c460f14de.jpg[/image]

What it is: A group of detectives investigating a mass murder leads to a slippery slope of corruption, the mob, sex, racism and Hollywood

Adapted: Into the Empire Hof nominated movie with Guy Pearce, yes.

From the Text: "Some men get the world, some men get ex-hookers and a trip to Arizona. You're in with the former, but my God I don't envy the blood on your conscience."

A Critic Writes: "Still the outstanding crime writer of his generation" (Independent)

Amazon/Wiki




Rhubarb -> RE: The Empire Forum's 100 Favourite Works of Fiction Results (27/6/2011 2:08:14 PM)

84 Perfume: The Story of a Murderer - Patrick SŁskind (1985) Novel

[image]http://behance.vo.llnwd.net/profiles4/117962/projects/301920/1179621252490118.jpg[/image]

What is it: The story of a man who has no sense of smell so goes out to find the perfect one. But untoward things happen, obviously.

Adapted? Yes, into a film by Tom Twyker, a Russian musical, and various times in pop music, by the likes of Nirvana, Air and Marilyn Manson

From the Text: "...And even as he spoke, the air around him was saturated with the odor of Amor and Psyche. Odors have a power of persuasion stronger than that of words, appearances, emotions, or will. The persuasive power of an odor cannot be fended off, it enters into us like breath into our lungs, it fills us up, imbues us totally."

A Critic Writes: "That this is in every sense an olfactory novel gives a striking sensory immediacy to the fiction itself. ''Perfume'' is a historical novel but one in which the sheer physicality of its theme lends it an honorary present tense"(New York Times)

Amazon/Wikipedia




Rhubarb -> RE: The Empire Forum's 100 Favourite Works of Fiction Results (6/7/2011 7:38:48 PM)

83 Frankenstein - Mary Shelley (1818) Novel

[image]http://www.coverbrowser.com/image/bestsellers-2007/2340-1.jpg[/image]

What it is: Famous gothic novel about a mad scientist who builds a new human out of dead ones. It works, but he gets more than he bargained for, obviously.

Adapted? Billions of times, most brilliantly by James Whale, (parodied by Mel Brooks) but also by Hammer, Andy Warhol and later by Kenneth Branagh. Recently resurrected (Sorry) on stage by Danny Boyle.

From the Text: "How can I describe my emotions at this catastrophe, or how delineate the wretch whom with such infinite pains and care I had endeavoured to form? His limbs were in proportion, and I had selected his features as beautiful. Beautiful! Great god, His yellow skin scarcely covered the work of muscle and arteries beneath; his hair was of a lustrous black, and flowing; his teeth of a pearly whiteness; but these luxuriances only formed a more horrid contrast with his watery eyes, that seemed almost of the same colour as the dun white sockets in which they were set, his shrivelled complexion, and straight black lips."

A Critic Writes: "upon the whole, the work impresses us with a high idea of the author's original genius and happy power of expression" (Walter Scott)

Wiki/Amazon




Rhubarb -> RE: The Empire Forum's 100 Favourite Works of Fiction Results (6/7/2011 8:02:42 PM)

82 The Great Gatsby - F Scott Fitzgerald (1925) Novel

[image]http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_3nJxmJRXU40/Swl9beo1ghI/AAAAAAAAAHk/Pjp2ilH0hpg/s1600/Gallery-Tschichold-Design-004.jpg[/image]

What it is: Flappers, cars, bootleggers, romance, broken noses; yes it can only be the roaring twenties.

Adapted? Half a dozen times for the cinema already, and Leo di Caprio and Carey Muligan are next up in Baz Lurhman's 3D adap. Also on the radio and in the form as a faux-NES game, quite brilliantly (http://greatgatsbygame.com/)

From the Text: "Everyone suspects himself of at least one of the cardinal virtues, and this is mine: I am one of the few honest people that I have ever known."

A Critic Writes: "Thereís more to the Gatsby cocktail than sex, lies, and organized crime. Although those are there, too, which, as far as reading the book goes, is kind of a motivation in itself."

Amazon/Wiki




Rhubarb -> RE: The Empire Forum's 100 Favourite Works of Fiction Results (6/7/2011 8:27:12 PM)

81 The Trial - Franz Kafka (1925) Novel

[image]http://www.coverbrowser.com/image/greatest-novels-of-all-time/73-1.jpg[/image]

What it is: A man wakes up accused of an unspecified crime by some shady unspecified authority. Its like, a metaphor.

Adapted? Famously by Orson Welles with Anthony PErkins as a twitchy Joesph K, perhaps less so by David Jones (not that one presumably) with Kyle MacLachlan as K. Martin Scorsese's After Hours uses The Trial as its base too.

From the Text: "Somebody must have slandered Joseph K., for without having done anything wrong he was arrested one fine morning."

A Critic Writes: I am only 14 years old and I loved this book. The book sounds completely meaningless when you finish and close it, but you must look deeper. It is very philosophical. It is about burocracy, laws, life.(Eni)

Amazon/Wiki




Rhubarb -> RE: The Empire Forum's 100 Favourite Works of Fiction Results (7/7/2011 3:06:06 PM)

80 Of Mice and Men - John Steinbeck (1937) Novel

[image]http://photo.goodreads.com/books/1239412348l/40698.jpg[/image]


What it is: The tale of Lennie and George, an oversized, mentally ill ranchworker and his small, smart companion, who dream about making enough money to live off the fat of the land.

Adapted? An Oscar nominated 1939 film with Lon Chaney Jr and Burgess Meredith, a TV movie with Randy Quaid, and one more with Gary Sinise which was in the running for the Palme d'or. Its also been done on the stage a few times, and the Lennie and George trope comes up in, and is frequently parodied in stuff like Looney Tunes.

From the Text: "Ainít many guys travel around together," he mused. "I donít know why. Maybe everíbody in the whole damn world is scared of each other."

A Critic Writes: "A perfect book" (Nick Hornby)

Amazon/Wiki




Rhubarb -> RE: The Empire Forum's 100 Favourite Works of Fiction Results (7/7/2011 3:28:57 PM)

79 Rebecca - Daphne du Maurier (1938) Novel

[image]http://kellymcmichael.files.wordpress.com/2009/08/reb.png[/image]


What it is: The story of a woman who married a man, and is convinced that he and everyone else in the house is still deeply in love with his now dead ex-wife

Adapted? Most notably in the Oscar winning form of Alfred Hitchcock, starring Larry Olivier and Joan Fontaine. Its been done on TV and referenced and parodied endlessly since, perhaps best by Mitchell and Webb.

From the Text: "Last night I dreamt I went to Manderley again"

A Critic Writes: "the material is of the humblest...nothing in this is beyond the novelette" (The Times)

Amazon/Wiki




Rhubarb -> RE: The Empire Forum's 100 Favourite Works of Fiction Results (4/9/2011 12:15:15 AM)

78 Emma - Jane Austen (1815) Novel

[image]http://simania.co.il/bookimages/covers70/708181.jpg[/image]

What it is: A spoilt, rich, unlikable central character plays matchmaker to help others fall in love, and maybe finds a little something for herself along the way.

Adapted? A whole bunch of times, especially by the BBC, but never more successful than in Amy Heckerling's high school masterpiece, Clueless which sets the action in spoiled Beverly Hills, and contains more hilarious references to Mark Walhberg than the novel does.

From the Text: One half of the world cannot understand the pleasures of the other.

Amazon/Wiki




Rhubarb -> RE: The Empire Forum's 100 Favourite Works of Fiction Results (4/9/2011 12:20:28 AM)

77 The Complete Works of John Keats - John Keats (1795-1821) Poetry, collection

[image]http://images.borders.com.au/images/bau/97800995/9780099529651/0/0/plain/bright-star-complete-poems-and-letters-of-keats.jpg[/image]

What is it: A collection of all the work of one of England's most beloved Poets

Adapted? His life, featuring a bit of his work was adapted for film by Jane Campion. I think Swords likes it.

From the Text: My heart aches, and a drowsy numbness pains
My sense, as though of hemlock I had drunk,
Or emptied some dull opiate to the drains
One minute past, and Lethe-wards had sunk:
íTis not through envy of thy happy lot,

Wiki/Amazon




Rhubarb -> RE: The Empire Forum's 100 Favourite Works of Fiction Results (4/9/2011 12:37:18 AM)

76 The Hounds of the Morrigan - Pat O'Shea (1985) Novel

[image]http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51k2thah0VL.jpg[/image]

What is It: The adventures through Celtic mythology of a ten year old and his sister

Adapted? No. Unless like, the radio or something. Wiki tells me nothing.

A Critic Writes: "The prose is rather relentlessly ornamented, but the images are always concrete and, like the narrative, have vigorous strength." (Uni of Chicago)

Wiki/Amazon




Rhubarb -> RE: The Empire Forum's 100 Favourite Works of Fiction Results (4/9/2011 12:44:34 AM)

75 American Psycho - Bret Easton Ellis (1991) Novel

[image]http://cdn.thegloss.com/files/2011/08/american.jpg[/image]

What it is: Yuppie indulges in cocaine, drinking, renting videos, talking about Genesis and murder.

Adapted? With Christian Bale, I think Piles likes it. Its being made into a musical as well, apparently

From the Text: there is an idea of a Patrick Bateman, some kind of abstraction, but there is no real me, only an entity, something illusory, and though I can hide my cold gaze and you can shake my hand and feel flesh gripping yours and maybe you can even sense our lifestyles are probably comparable: I simply am not there."

Wiki/Amazon




Rhubarb -> RE: The Empire Forum's 100 Favourite Works of Fiction Results (4/9/2011 12:52:28 AM)

74 The Big Nowhere - James Ellroy (1988) Novel

[image]http://www.onesevendesign.com/covers/big_nowhere.jpg[/image]

What is it: Murder! Case-Solving! Hollywood! Communists!

Adapted? Nowhere

From the Text: "Call me Dudley. We're of equal rank. I'm older, but you're far better looking. I can tell we're going to be grand partners."

Wiki/Amazon




Rhubarb -> RE: The Empire Forum's 100 Favourite Works of Fiction Results (4/9/2011 1:02:23 AM)

73 Harry Potter and The Deathly Hallows - JK Rowling (2007) Novel

[image]http://tinkerblue.typepad.com/photos/uncategorized/2007/06/07/harry_potter_book_7.jpg[/image]

What is it: The final part of the Harry Potter saga, where he finally has to take on old Voldemort properly, as the latter has stopped messing around and started actually taking over the world.

Adapted? I think it was quite a high profile film. Oh no, it was two quite high profile films.

From the Text: That which Voldemort does not value, he takes no trouble to understand. Of house-elves and children's tales, of love, loyalty, and innocence, Voldemort knows and understands nothing. Nothing. That they all have a power beyond his own, a power beyond the reach of any magic, is a truth he has never grasped.

Wiki/Amazon




Rhubarb -> RE: The Empire Forum's 100 Favourite Works of Fiction Results (4/9/2011 1:41:34 PM)

72. The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle - Haruki Murakami (1995/1997 in English) Novel

[image]http://www.exorcising-ghosts.co.uk/images/HM-WindUpBirdChronicle(2010HarvilleSecker%20limited%20edition).jpg[/image]

What it is: A man's cat runs away and it serves at the catalyst to the realisation that everything is a bit complicated.

Adapted? Don't think so.

From the Text: "Is it possible, in the final analysis, for one human being to achieve perfect understanding of another?
We can invest enormous time and energy in serious efforts to know another person, but in the end, how close can we come to that person's essence? We convince ourselves that we know the other person well, but do we really know anything important about anyone?"


Wiki/Amazon




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