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Lost: The End

Posted on Monday May 24, 2010, 01:12 by James White in Small Screen
Lost: The End

“Endings are hard. Any chapped-ass monkey with a keyboard can poop out a beginning, but endings are impossible. You try to tie up every loose end, but you never can. The fans are always gonna bitch. There's always gonna be holes. And since it's the ending, it's all supposed to add up to something. I'm telling you, they're a raging pain in the ass…” No, that’s not Dickens or Shakespeare (or even the Earl of Oxford) writing about how it’s difficult to end a story, but Chuck Shurley, the meta-comment prophet who writes up the adventures of the Winchester brothers on Supernatural.

But it’s a sentiment that Lost’s key creative torchbearers Damon Lindelof and Carlton Cuse would surely empathise with right now. After all, they’ve been charged with the responsibility of landing the multi-tonne mythology aircraft that is the show’s swirling, question-packed plotline in one supersized, two-and-a-half hour (with adverts) last gasp.

Cuse and Lindelof have it easier than some, though – it’s more common for shows to get cancelled than to enjoy a real sense of conclusion, and even those that do face the firing squad of devout fans unhappy that some story arcs petered out, or that a particular couple didn’t live happily ever after. Take The X-Files, which, admittedly didn’t so much tie up threads as tie itself in knots with an overall story that eventually felt it was being written by a team throwing darts at cards in their office and writing up whatever plot point they landed on. Others have stuck the landing with a little more grace – Quantum Leap ended on a metaphysical, open-ended note, slightly depressing note, but it gave Sam Beckett an emotional send-off. Joss Whedon was smart enough to keep Buffy from spiralling up its own narrative backside, even if his duties overseeing Angel and Firefly meant hands-off approach during the last couple of seasons that didn’t always pay dividends, and the big finish annoyed just as many fans as it pleased.

No, Lost has had a solid end date set for a couple of years now, and the producers have been able to plan to this point to some degree. Even though, as they’ve admitted in the past, a fair amount of the show is left to evolve naturally, or, if you prefer, mostly made up as they go along. Which means that there have still been plenty of issues with storylines that have been dropped or characters written out with no particular reason.

There really is no way that the show can go out pleasing everyone or answering every question. Even recent, dramatic exposition dumps like Across The Sea from a couple of weeks ago, annoyed and delighted in equal measure (some liked finding out more about Jacob and his evil brother, The Man In Black, others complained it was too late, and a few hated the story behind how TMIB became Smokey). And it’s not like the show is being shown on the same night across several countries, with enough news coverage (at least here in the US) to hype up the pop cultural weight of the whole endeavour. Oh… yeah. That too. So, no pressure, then.

For my part, I’ve been back and forth on the series from the start. The pilot grabbed me and season one kept me hooked. Then season two began to drag and I checked out, frustrated with how the quality had seemed to dip and how annoying I found the characters. I was tempted back in right at the end of that season’s story, and have since caught up, watching the last few seasons as they unfolded. While still not convinced the producers would pull off the party trick of a totally satisfying ending, I was more than willing to watch them try.

It goes without saying that there are spoilers from this point on for those who have yet to watch the finale.

With Jack, then Hurley becoming the next Jacob and protecting the island (with Ben as his second-in-command), plus Jack sacrificing himself to save the place while the likes of Kate and co make their escape, and the Sideways Universe, with its alt-versions of the characters, including just about everyone who has ever appeared in the series (save a couple of notable exceptions, such as Waaaaaaaalt!!!), the show aimed high, but didn't always succeed.

The finale was everything Lost has come to be: a compelling blend of character work, pseudo-complicated mythology and philosophical references and a few well-chosen Star Wars references from Hurley. “I have a bad feeling about this,” sayeth the rotund one near the start.

He wasn’t totally wrong – the big finish was full of a lot of things that frustrated me about the show – a last few spins of the merry-go-round with people captured, escaping etc, etc, and characters making declarations, then refusing to explain what they mean right away in the service of keeping the mystery alive to brain-numbing levels and about subjects both hugely meaningful and utterly mundane. “That’s a hell of a long con, Doc,” says Sawyer at one point when Jack mentions he doesn’t know how Desmond is supposed to act as a weapon against Locke’s plans. And in many ways, so was the show – it it had to keep the story playing out, twisting and turning itself in all sorts of directions to survive cast changes, narrative shifts and the odd misstep here and there (Nikki and Paulo, looking at you.) As for Jack’s final attempt to save the island, which was essentially a big jigsaw piece slotting into place (can’t wait for the scholarly articles about the show using the “phallo-centric imagery” of plunging the “male totem into the decidedly female life hole” to help the island recover.) So many storylines had to knit together - the various factions, Miles, the seemingly immortal Richard Alpert (who develops his first grey hair) and Frank Lapidus the pilot, the Sideways plot – that it was sometimes a messy jumble of scenes, with plenty of the usual overwrought emotion. Other moments - with characters finding each other or their place in the universe, were soaring and triumphant, and using matching moments from Jack as he dies to provide a bookend to the series was inspired visual work.

And that last, big reveal? That the Sideways Universe was bringing everyone together in a sort of metaphysical waiting room, ready to “move on” to whatever lies next. And that, thankfully, the island wasn’t actually purgatory (which would have meant original co-creator JJ Abrams and more than one Lost producer had pants-on-fire syndrome)? I was split on the idea. It’s certainly an audacious move, revealing that the entire cast is dead at the end, right up there with St Elsewhere’s having taken place inside at autistic child’s head and very similar to Six Feet Under’s parade of passing-on. It was a bold move to cut down on spin-off ideas that US network ABC might have been plotting (though there’s scope for plenty of fan fiction and canon work beyond, since everyone dies at different times). No wonder they had a large chunk of the episode take place in that world - as more and more reunions occurred, so many relationship circles were closed that an almost ridiculous amount of fan-pleasing boxes were ticked. They couldn’t have gone much further, short of Drive Shaft breaking into You All Everybody at the big charity event that brings everyone together. You'd have to be emotionless not to feel a little touched. But it felt just a little bit too… easy. It’s sort of heart crushing to watch the whole series and then get to the end only to discover that was how they chose to close the door.

Plus, while the producers were adamant that, like in life outside of TV-land, some questions would remain unanswered, so much was simply left to dangle that it couldn’t help but leave a vaguely sour taste in the mouth and an itch in the brain about sloppy, overambitious writing. I still enjoyed the emotional beats and the performances from the show’s standouts – Jorge Garcia, Michael Emerson and Terry O’Quinn – which were well up to the task, all of it scored with Michael Giacchino’s typically evocative, now trademark strings.

Yet it was never going to satisfy everything and everyone, and indeed that’s exactly what happened. But with a series as complicated as this, that’s endings for you – hard.

Lost goes out, then, in much the way it lived. It’s been an interesting journey. Not always fulfilling, but more often than not, intriguing and pleasurable.

Reviewing a long finale at the end of a six-season run late at night after having just watched it and with little time to digest or re-screen anything is not the most ideal circumstance, and I’m sure my opinion will shift as I get further away from it. For now though, I’ve rambled on long enough.

Your thoughts on the finale, folks?

Login or register to comment.

Comments

1 portman180
Posted on Monday May 24, 2010, 08:50
I actually really agree with you. I HATE the idea that the Flash-Sideways were actually a kind of purgatory. I can picture the conversation now:

Carlton
"Hey, I can't actually think of a way to end the show"
Damon
"I know, lets use that 'Purgatory' idea that was thrown around by everyone during the first season"
Carlton
"You're so right. If everyone thought it was that in the first place then they can't be disappointed"
Damon
"I know, right? But, lets add some Flash-Sideways to make it feel fresh"
Carlton
"Even better idea, lets make it as though the Flash-Sideways are actually Flash-Forwards and that can be our Purgatory"
Damon
"Carlton? You are a genius."
Carlton
"Agreed, no one will see that coming"
Damon
"True, also it'll confuse people sooo much that we won't have to answer the important questions like Where did the Island come from? Or, who put the Light in the island? Or, why was Jacob suck a nob?"
Carlton
"We have really outdone ourselves this time. Lets go and have some 'bum-fun' to celebrate"

2 boredbluekoala
Posted on Monday May 24, 2010, 08:55
A SATISFYING ENDING TO A GREAT SHOW, ONE THAT WILL BE REMEMBERED FOR IT'S CHARACTERS, WRITING, PHOTOGRAPHY, MUSIC AND PREMISE. I LOVED EVERY DAMN MINUTE OF IT. (but what did the numbers mean? ......................just kidding)

3 dcheater
Posted on Monday May 24, 2010, 09:12
Thematically and emotionally: the finale was an outrageous piece of brilliance, bittersweet and melancholy, touching and controversial.

Literally and technically: an epic, dismal belly flop. There were LITERALLY no answers. No hint at what the islands actual function is, or what it it's purpose was. No hint at what the Egyptian architecture and hieroglyphics were or meant. No answer as to where Taweret came from. No name for MiB. No Walt in the flash sideways. No reasoning for why Libby was in the mental hospital. No finality to the pocket watch swapped between Richard and Locke. No reasoning behind ANY of the "rules". No explanation as to why Jacob was at first portrayed as a God-like figure but was really just a massive douche with mummy issues.

On the whole though, it's great such a pioneering piece of television was allowed to end on it's own terms. This episode won't just polarize the audience, it'll polarize anyone who watched it.


4 daniel 1984
Posted on Monday May 24, 2010, 09:16
The Ending of the show was fantasic!!
Does this mean all the survivers of oceanic 815 cash are all dead and in purgarory? What happend to Frank,Miles,Sawyer,Kate,Claire & Richard after they they left the island? Does this mean they're dead too?
It doesnt take much to confuse me? but the writers of lost confussed me more with the flash backs, flash forwords and flash side ways?
Dont get me wrong the writters of lost are brilliant to confuse alot of fans of the show. If anyone Could Let me know what happend in the end of Lost E-mail please on
danielrharris23@yahoo.co.uk


5 harrishighland
Posted on Monday May 24, 2010, 09:26
Personally I thought it was a great ending to possibly my favourite ever show. For me the whole answers to the mysteries has always been of secondary importance, as my favourite part of the show has always been watching the growth and development of the characters, and I believe the finale really showed how far each one of them have come, like jack finally learning how to let go, whether it be in the real world or the sideways world. Absolutely loved the show and I can't wait for the entire series box set to be released.

6 dunkah
Posted on Monday May 24, 2010, 10:15
I preferred the Ashes To Ashes finale to be honest.

7 siyoung91
Posted on Monday May 24, 2010, 10:17
I think the finale to such an intriguing show was always going to leave some sort of lingering emptiness and unfulfillment.

Having said that, for the most part the finale was actually quite satisfying. I thought the final shot was superb and many of the 'realisation' scenes were excellent - Sun and Jin being my personal fave. Equally, the rain-soaked and grey battle between Jack and Flocke was a real treat.

I actually really liked the 'alternate timeline is purgatory' twist. It just allows the show to come to a kind of closure without copping out too much. Plus, it meant that a lot of it can be left up to the imagination, which is precisely why I love Lost: the concept of theorising after every episode was part of the excitement.

Granted, some key questiond remained unanswered (Richard Alpert's eyeliner, anyone?) and the evident character omissions (Walt, Michael, Eko, Libby) were difficult to ignore. But on the whole, the finale was as successful as it could have been. I challenge anyone to come up with a better one in 2 hours!

8 oddzag
Posted on Monday May 24, 2010, 10:35
Is no one going to mention how the finale of Lost and Ashes to Ashes were basically the same?...It's purgatory.
Just saying it.

9 Scruff
Posted on Monday May 24, 2010, 10:39
I really don't see it as a purgatory, but rather a cosmic epilogue. Or something.
Anyway, absolutely loved it, I don't get people complaining about unresolved mysteries. The ones that weren't explained (no impregnating/surviving to term on The Island) are hardly relevant to the major ones.

10 Scruff
Posted on Monday May 24, 2010, 10:40
@oddzag

It's not purgatory.

11 Kurtis93
Posted on Monday May 24, 2010, 10:55
Very like Ashes to Ashes ending, but i would have preferred a big explosion or something.

12 plum bob
Posted on Monday May 24, 2010, 11:28
Kurtis93 has got it right, what we needed was a bigass explosion - still I reckon Jack bauer should deliver on tht when 24 bows out tonight!!

13 Dr Coop
Posted on Monday May 24, 2010, 12:13
Nothing has yet to beat the season finale of the shield, that was just all types of awesome and an amazing way to end the show

14 mattbojangles
Posted on Monday May 24, 2010, 13:09
I thought the ending was good, in hindsight it was tied together nicely, the finale acted as a love letter to all of those characters and thats how it should have been. I feel that questions about how the light got there, how the island came to be etc would have warranted more than one finale episode to discuss so it seems right that they were left out, it also leaves a more ambiguous and mysterious ending that is very much fitting for a show such as this. I felt that yes there were things i wanted to see in the finale that were left out, but in the end i was happy about how it all concluded, a first class tv series.

15 mrfluffy
Posted on Monday May 24, 2010, 13:14
Libby was in the church hugging Hurly

16 badsanta
Posted on Monday May 24, 2010, 13:15
When did Empire turn into TV Times?

17 Brother L
Posted on Monday May 24, 2010, 13:23
Sorry, underwhelmed with the contradictory finale. I accepted a long time ago that it would be nigh impossible to answer all the questions posed or even link them. Like most, I'm certain many of the early storylines were composed on the hoof or with assistance from drugs, but hoped that the finale would be audacious and provoking. This was neither. It was un-orignal and cliched. There was symbolism and obliqueness aplenty but for once there should have been more answers than questions. I'm not even sure if the island was real or if they died when the plane crashed.........surely this should not have been left to the viewers interpretation? I could go on for screeds with observations and questions but will finish with just two. Christian Shephard - Is that his name or his job..........and what was the point/meaning of the dog at the closure?

18 fuzzy
Posted on Monday May 24, 2010, 13:32
siyoung91

You could argue that Michael was an outsider after what he did, and probably not all that welcome. Walt fell foul of reality (the actor would have aged too much). And Libby was there at the end with Hugo (I'm pretty sure of it). As far as Eko, he'd fall into a large group of other 'Losties' that weren't the 'core' group that came together at the end.

19 granny
Posted on Monday May 24, 2010, 13:52
The question few people seem to be asking is - how did Ben get out fromunder the tree? One minute he's there, the next moving around unharmed.
If time was tight, the whole tree thing should have been left on the floor.

20 peternicholls2002
Posted on Monday May 24, 2010, 14:57
It was never going to be perfect and it wasn't but as a bow out for a great series it was more than I could have hoped for. Yes loads of questions unanswered - including why did Locke have to wear a disposable hat going to have his operation when he's bald!!?? - but I loved it. It's been emotional!!!

21 ChesterCopperpot
Posted on Monday May 24, 2010, 15:09
Lost is shit. People, go and watch proper shows like BSG and the greatest of them all, The Wire.

22 danclay77
Posted on Monday May 24, 2010, 15:10
Stop moaning and accept it people. Those that stuck with Lost will recognise it was as good as ending as we could have hoped for. Those that gave up and still post stupid questions like "What's the island's function?" have obviously watched two episodes - The Pilot and The End - shame on you! Sorry for the rant but as someone who's stuck through all 121 episodes (even that stupid paralysing spider one!) I thought it was great!

23 andy18280
Posted on Monday May 24, 2010, 15:24
Not perfect straight after watching it i felt like i had been robbed of the finale i wanted looking back a few hours later it doesnt seem as bad although it feels more like a goodbye episode to all the cast rather than an epic climax that we had all hoped for maybe if they had introduced the tunnel of light earlier it wouldnt have seemed like such a rushed plot device to get the programme to a finish gonna miss it but all good things must come to an end at least true blood seems to be getting it right still

24 dcheater
Posted on Monday May 24, 2010, 15:37
danclay77

I've seen all 121 episodes. A few, many times and I struggle to see how "what's the islands function" is a stupid question. You watch the extras from season one you see J.J and Damon both express that the appeal of taking on a show like Lost was that the island became a character as well. It's resolution was non existent.

25 danclay77
Posted on Monday May 24, 2010, 15:40
Not meaning to grumble dcheater but did you miss the episode where Jacob explained the island was a testing ground to prove mankind was essentially good, not bad and that it stood on hell mouth (as in Buffy!) Therefore it probably is a stupid question isn't it? I'm only playing devil's advocate but sweeping statements like "It didn't answer anything!" are way off the mark. The Guardian agree with me too!

26 mogel96
Posted on Monday May 24, 2010, 15:41
I think that series six would have been better as a whole without the flash- sideways, that way the writers would have had more time to develop a decent finale. The proper end was fantastic, I loved the way how the last few minutes was a reverse on the pilots begining, but the happy happy huggy heaven bit just seemed so tacky, hopefully the extended cut on the DVD shall give people who care a better explanation.... and achance to fast forward the lame flash- sideways bits.

27 Brother L
Posted on Monday May 24, 2010, 15:53
I think if you've devoted over 120 hours of your time watching Lost you are entitled to moan if you feel the ending does not match the highs in quality and originality consistently acheived throughout it's run. I loved it but honestly expected more (maybe even an outrageous twist) for the conclusion. The ending was derivative and reminded me of, amongst other things, Jacobs Ladder. Of course it also did not help that Ashes to Ashes had a similar finale on Friday..................

28 danclay77
Posted on Monday May 24, 2010, 16:00
Which they copied from their own idea in "Life of Mars"!

29 dcheater
Posted on Monday May 24, 2010, 16:21
But danclay77,

That's just what jacob used it for, a game between him and MiB,

The island precedes both of them. I doubt Hurley used it as a battle ground for good and evil, he used it to get cheese burgers I reckon.

30 danclay77
Posted on Monday May 24, 2010, 16:33
Perhaps Hell is one giant McDonalds - the one near me is on a Saturday lunch time!

31 trismantis
Posted on Monday May 24, 2010, 16:45
Has anyone worked out Jack's cut neck in the Purgatory scenes...?

32 danclay77
Posted on Monday May 24, 2010, 16:48
Puncturing through from the island I think during the fight with Locke; he held the knife at Jack's throat. Perhaps it was a way of reality forcing itself upon Jack - not sure!

33 conradthebarbarian2
Posted on Monday May 24, 2010, 18:08
I felt there were essentially two parts to the finale.

Part one- the actual plot, Jack vs. MiB with an epic fight and Jack's sacrifice was a great end to the series, it totally fit with the show wrapped up the plot for season 6.

Part two- a kind of farewell and an exploration of death.

I thought part one was great. but part two was a little cheesy, at some point it just looked like they had filmed a cast party for the actors. I mean- everybody from season six getting together in a church to hug it out?

-and Walt and Michael aren't allowed in the church because they're still trapped on the island.

34 mblaze
Posted on Monday May 24, 2010, 18:28
When people say they wanted the function of the island revealed, what exactly do you want? The island is just there, and that's it. It is the ultimate authority, it preceeds everyone, why would anyone know definitively and the rules and meanings to it.

If you want an outright explination, then that sounds dangerously close to The Architect scene in the second Matrix, which as we all know, is the worst thing commited to film ever

35 djaidan
Posted on Monday May 24, 2010, 18:54
ok i know im gonne get lambasted for this, but can anyone please explain when penny, kate, sawyer, and miles all died????? and if hurley and ben stayed on the island, how are they in the flash sideways?

36 djaidan
Posted on Monday May 24, 2010, 18:59
And if the island is supposed to be a mechanism for peole to redeem themselves, what about the "others" etc who died or were killed on the island

37 matthumphrey
Posted on Monday May 24, 2010, 19:10
Ok, so they ended the show with a reveal that was well acted and well produced and neatly wrapped up with a sense of finality.

BUT...Does it not stink like it's all been one massive re-write to anyone else?

After the first season everyone loved this show and all the theories started soon after; The most popular of which was the purgatory theory. Something tells me that that was the original ending to this show, and not the adjusted "created purgatory/most important time" ending.

If we are to view it from the perspective that the island WAS Purgatory... the whole thing kinda makes sense....We can allow the smaller (and weirder) questions to be left untouched as we can try to relate with what might be going through someone's head whilst in purgatory.. and can forgive the sudden inclusion of a polar bear, or a pirate ship, or a murderous plume of smoke and what all these things might represent.

If the island is purgatory, we can follow characters through reason and doubt, science and faith, imagination and fact, and (ultimately) denial and acceptance. We can explore their pasts (and possible futures) for reasoning. We can also finally assume that a "christian sheppard" will turn up as a guide at the end..

It all fits with the island is Purgatory idea...

However... to me, It seems that the actual ending was a direct result of the audience wising up to the writers at a very early stage. The 1st season was such a success and planted all the seeds of self-exploration after death/purgatory that they could not go back completely on the purgatory theme, so instead they tweaked the ending with the flash-sideways as a created purgatory ending... and to me, it doesn't quite fit.

It seems like a cop out from the writers on the basis that they've always prided themselves with knowing more than we (the audience) do at all times... however.. it kind of turns out we might have been correct right from the start... or half correct... or... fuck it...

38 djaidan
Posted on Monday May 24, 2010, 19:25
im with matt on this one, the island as purgatory makes sense. it was the popular theory early on, and the story arcs of ecko, boon and shannon made it quite obvious early on. when they resolve their issues they died on the island. the writers knew that if we knew this was the answer we might all switch off b4 the end. and then the flash sideways was the waiting room where they all meet for one last good bye.

39 mrjones
Posted on Monday May 24, 2010, 21:50
Don't mean to be picky here, (beyond the usual), bt for all those saying it's a rip-off of Ashes to Asshes, (or the other show), I might point out that they're all a rip-off of 'the Last Battle' by CS Lewis.

On a Lost-related point, I agree with someone above in that I got how various of the characters died during the course of the show and then we saw them in 'purgatory', (Jin, Sun, Libby, Jack, Sayid), but the others, (sawyer, Kate, etc), we didn't. And if the plane crash killed everyone, that doesn't tie into Juliet and Ben, neither of whom were on the plane.

And am I the only one who still doesn't quite get how in the 'alternate' (purgatory) timeline, Sawyer was now a cop. Is the implication that he was also a cop on the original flight? (given that most of the other chars were the same in the sideways timeline, his sudden change of 'career' seems odd, at best).

Summarised perfeectly above - well-acted, emotionally fulfilling, horrendously empty plot-wise.

Bah. It's bloody BSG all over again.... (best ending ever - the Angel finale, which in one episode made it virtually my favourite show ever; stick that ending onto BSG, you have perfection - not literally, of course, cause that would just be weird)

40 mrjones
Posted on Monday May 24, 2010, 21:51
Oh, and Eko didn't make it because Adebale (sp?) wanted too much money, apparently.... Just FYI

41 garrettwall
Posted on Monday May 24, 2010, 22:03
For djaidan
Thought I'd answer you're original question with my own theory.
When Jack died and the others escaped in the plane, Hurley and Ben stayed on and many stories continued. The other "universe" was a place where they all met up when they had all died, some many years in the future which is why Kate said "I've missed you so much Jack". The conversation between Jack and his father was key...he said it was a place outside of time, no "now" and that is where they all went to "find" each other again before moving on to the next life...once they all realised their connection and relative importance they were ready to move on although other characters such as Daniel, Ana Luisa, Ben and many others didn't move on with them, choosing to stay on in purgatory for their own personal reasons. The core character group had found their place in the universe and needed each other to make the next step and of course it was a great ploy for bringing them together at the end.
It was definitely confusing since it made everyone think they'd all been dead all along and that the Island was Purgatory, but I don't think it was...
Loved the ending myself, very poignant and moving.
cheers

42 maxsmorris
Posted on Monday May 24, 2010, 22:19
Sickening, infantile, cop-out. I was taught at 8 that ending any story 'but it was just a dream' was a no-no. This ranks up there with ol' Bobby Ewing's returning act or Michael Jackson's thrilling Thriller denouement. To go through so many series of unexpurgated drivel and end up with a 'fuck it - we can't think of anything better than make this all fantasy as they're dead' is tossing two patronising fingers up at any credible viewer with more than two brain cells. Waste of time and a serious case of milking a high-concept drama for way more than it's worth. Ashes to Ashes did the same thing in two series and was far more credible for it. Over-inflated, atypical American bollocks. I'm glad I never watched it...x

43 djaidan
Posted on Monday May 24, 2010, 22:27
thanks garrett, that kinda makes sense alright. theres soooo much to take in :P

44 agent cooper
Posted on Monday May 24, 2010, 22:53
Thank god Ashes To Ashes gave itself and Life On Mars the ending it deserved it showed this lazy bloated show for what it is, 6 years of mine and my Wife's life wasted to get this, I think outside of the box and have no problem with ambiguous endings but this was just very poor and utterly unsatisfying.

I never expected everything to be answered and I'm sure some will write into it more than others and convince themselves it was a brilliant ending but for me I was left cheated and let down. The Wire, Twin Peaks & Soprano's has no fear of been toppled from it's pedestals as the best T.V series of all time not at least by this utter waste of time anyway

45 HBK_nWo33
Posted on Monday May 24, 2010, 23:36
In my opinion, the perfect ending to the perfect TV show. I loved every minute of it and am glad there is still some mysteries left, like Abrams himself has said sometimes the imagination is better than an actual answer. Especially after people's imagination has run wild on it for years.

The finale was all about closure for the characters and the fans, and it provided that beautifully and poetically and ANY genuine fan of Lost would've been emotionally touched by this ending. This show has always been about the characters, and it ended all about the characters, which is how it should. The only reason we've been getting so many answers recently is because the fans have been sulking about the lack of them previously, it was nothing to do with Lost changing focus from characters to answers.

Congratulations Cuse, Lindelof and everyone involved. You have made a masterpiece, whether the complainers realise it or not.

46 HBK_nWo33
Posted on Monday May 24, 2010, 23:41
@ maxsmorris:

You can tell you have never watched any of the show. They weren't all dead, they have all died either during the duration of or after the show. The show is still their life dumbass, only the flash-sideways was purgatory which takes place way in the future. Actually read the article properly or watch the show you are commenting on instead of mindlessly posting anti-American drivel you're just showing us English as being ignorant mindless idiots and whilst that is clearly the case as far as you're concerned, I would prefer not be to be tarred with the same brush. Idiot.

47 Cabalx
Posted on Monday May 24, 2010, 23:50
The emotional journey of the characters was satisfying, but there comes a point where leaving so man questions unanswered (particularly where they were questions being asked from season one. Don't the fans deserve more?) becomes bad story telling.

Great show, too bad about the ending.

48 boostergold
Posted on Tuesday May 25, 2010, 00:15
Ashes to Ashes was done far better and was at least in keeping with the shows narrative; lost was a fantastic show until The End came along, I felt like laughing at the climax especially considering it had just been done on friday night on Ashes! It was poor and looked like a toothpaste ad in the church with everyone grinning and hugging. Like many other posters I felt cheated by the infantile ending which I believe my 4 year old son must have sent in to Cuse and Lindelof. This is what English teachers warned us about- you can't end your fantasy tv show with the phrase "and I woke up and it was all a dream" or anything akin to that. Season 5 pissed all over this and was far more exciting!

49 Bizz90
Posted on Tuesday May 25, 2010, 02:04
if nothing else this finale at least, finally, made me come to peace with the ending of Battlestar Galactica; which was gob-smackingly simplistic and linear in comparison. I think we all just got suckered into genuinely believing they knew what they were doing the whole time when in fact they were like every other writing staff working in major American television - i.e. they made it up as they went along. Too many good ideas, too little time. Can't help but feel like they answered all of the wrong questions.

50 VincentWire
Posted on Tuesday May 25, 2010, 03:09
Some guys opens his eye, there's a lot of nonsense, some guy closes his eye. The End.

51 kevmccann
Posted on Tuesday May 25, 2010, 08:42
I agree with comment 6.

Maybe when the writers realise that the fans were neither happy or unhappy at the ending they will re-visit the series in a cash hoping bid to salvage something. Maybe it will have all been a dream as Bobby Ewing comes out of the shower!

The similarities between the end senario of 'Lost' and 'Ashes to Ashes' were uncanny (apart from the Quattro meeting it's demise), maybe the God that is Gene Hunt should visit the island and kick some nancy, french, bender, Man Utd supporting man in black's arse!

Oh and a couple of other things:

1. Why does Ben Linus stay outside at the end of 'Lost'?
2. If Hugo was now like Jacob/Jack, i.e. immortal unless someone stabs him with a special dagger in the chest without talking to him ever - how come he is dead?
3. What the hell am I going to do with my life now that both 'Lost' and 'Ashes to Ashes' have now finished???!!!

52 scabo33
Posted on Tuesday May 25, 2010, 09:04
I agree.. awesome send out for the story.

Id like to add that the reason mike and walt were not in the church,,,is because they betrayed them to the others! and went home!...they had no connection. But the dog stuck by them all! :)


53 scabo33
Posted on Tuesday May 25, 2010, 09:06
and ben wasnt ready to move on yet for his mistakes... he did murder locke..and watched his daughter die.. he had a lot to deal with in purgatory

But he was forgiven by all of them..

54 Dr Science
Posted on Tuesday May 25, 2010, 10:19
I thought it was disappointing - not so much because it left so many questions unanswered (not only was that inevitable but it was also desirable) - but more that the very end was rushed and badly written - it was that one last scene between Jack and Christian that ruined it: "I'm dead", then "Everybody's dead", then "It's time to move on" - this was weak - probably one of the weakest scenes in the whole series.

Having said that I like the fact that there is still room for confusion - it's completely unclear to me whether they all died at the very start of the first episode and the whole story was some sort of cosmic trial that all of the characters needed to pass to "move on" (but it's not purgatory?) - in which case it doesn't matter if there are holes in the logic, but that implies that there really was no broader significance to any of it and excuses all of the red herrrings.

Or the competing explanation that the island was real, that they did survive the crash, that there was some logic and significance to it all - that it should matter to the world that Jack died to save the light. And that they all died eventually and were reunited in the flash-sideways at some unknown of undefinable point in their futures (e.g. Hurley and Ben spend a whole subsequent life protecting the island - we don't get to see it buit it is hinted at in their final conversation). But for me that explanation just feels wrong and means that the all of the plot devices did have significance and the rules mattered and therefore there should be some logic behind the selection of characters that we see in the funeral home at the end. But I don't think the writers did enough to make that a convincing resolution.

55 dragon_irl
Posted on Tuesday May 25, 2010, 10:54
Look, the end was shit. We're all disappointed and it was a complete cop out. This blog can be closed now.

56 Col. Hans Landa
Posted on Tuesday May 25, 2010, 11:17
The final episode was really bad. I wasn't a big fan of "Lost", but I thought it was one of the greatest tv series -after 24-. I was disappointed.

57 veemoo
Posted on Tuesday May 25, 2010, 11:23
I had guessed they would all be at the party/concert in the end when Desmond wasn't allowed see the guest list. The fact that that was true, is terrible. I've never guessed any of it right thus far. Very predictable. Although no one could have predicated the 'pergatory' bit because early on the writers had given a definite "they're not in pergatory". One could say the writers found their own loop-hole themselves to bring them to what was probably the original meant-to-be ending of the show.

I was dying to see Alex have a realisation moment with Ben at the end, and that would have been brilliant to watch. Just one of the many things I wantd. They had a choice to give a fairwell to the story or a farewell to the characters. They went for the latter unfortunately.

Could anyone face watchin it all again?

58 darko18
Posted on Tuesday May 25, 2010, 11:47
Overall, I loved it. Claire and Charlie's realisation scene made me tear up, and the final scene in the church got me. Now that the poster above me mentioned it, a scene between Alex and Ben would have good.

Jack's final scene was brilliant and there's just something beauiful about it I can't put my finger on.

My only disappointment was some of the loose ends they failed to tie up. I fine with them not tying up everything, but what they did resolve was done sloppily and felt like the writers didn't know what to do themselves (Kate and co on the plane, Hurley and co left behind, the heart of the island).

4/5

59 sturutter
Posted on Tuesday May 25, 2010, 12:40
I recently had a little girl... no sleep etc and I still got up at 5 to watch the ending i had hoped for. 6 years I waited for some answers. My wife hates the show and all along i've championed how different it is and then the ending is just a 2 and a half hour extension of the bit at the end in titanic.
I've been looking through what other people thought and its too easy to say it was a good ending because it didn't answer anything. it was just confused.
lets start at the end, the over credit shot of the plane crash without surviors is that meant to symbolise that no one survived in the first place? the alternate world/purgatory was a weak explanation for something that didn't need to be there and just made me feel what the hell has all that went before even all the way to the beginings of Jacob and MIB got to do with the plane crash then? if the over-reaching point to the show is that everybody dies then why bother with anything else?
Desmond was the best character and i thank the lost writers for his epsiodes but he didn't get to say a word after about the 10th minute and he didn't get a final resolution in the real life with penny. The best story in it. The only ones I cared that in 'real' life got back together was desmond and penny.
so many questions left unaswered that it was lazy to not do even a 2 minute island flash! the star wars references should have been extended to indy 4. When Jack replugged the stone he should have had an island mind melt that shown him it starting (roman/greek?), how the mother got there, the light, Jacob saying "i've got a new game" with the MIB (because his brother was already dead), why dead people could be seen, and flashed through the bones that were clearly seen on the floor.
just lazy...my final thoughts - sticking with the star wars link. this was as dissapointing as the prequals were to the whole story. but at least we got to see the birth of darth with that.
NNNNNNNNOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO

60 rxqueen2410
Posted on Tuesday May 25, 2010, 12:54
Gotta say, was completely disappointed with the ending.

It feels like the previous 5 series' were pointless - why bother posing all of these wonderful questions and mysteries and not bothering to answer 99% of them?

Also - when did everyone die? Why was it so centered on Jack? What's the point of building up such awesome characters to give them no real conclusion or closure.

I think the crux of what I'm trying to say is WHAT'S THE POINT? After investing 6 years of my life in what is possibly the best programme I've ever watched, I feel ripped off and manipulated by the cheesiest, most Yank ending they could have possibly come up with.

And don't even get me started on what a whitebread, middle American "Christian" ending it was...and for such a multi-cultural show...

61 wenna_berry_23
Posted on Tuesday May 25, 2010, 13:29
After being so much in love with the series I can't help but love the ending even if it was a little obvious, i agree that it seems like they picked purgatory because people were throwing it around in the first series.
If it was up to me it wouldn't have ended yet, i wasn't ready for that however it was never end to satisfy me because they murdered charlie a few series in - not a good move!
I also think killing of jack was horrible, i hate the thought of him being dead while others will live on for a while but i think him dying in the bamboo with the shoe and the dog was so perfect, it seemed right no matter how much i didnt want it!
There are still questions i would like answered but i guess that goes for everyone . .

plus. . .'christian shepherd'! how did i not get that til last night!!!!???

62 petejwheeldon
Posted on Tuesday May 25, 2010, 14:27
There are two separate elements to the finale: the story of the island which we have followed from the start and the flash sideways worlds introduced in series 6.

The former was clearly stated to be the “real world”, and the mysterious events (time travel, moving islands, Jacob’s power, the smoke monster, etc) were as a result of the mysterious electro magnetic power which existed at the island heart.

Jacob and his stepmother explained at various points that the island existed as a means to test the inherent “goodness” of mankind, and I believe that the power at its centre was something akin to pure goodness or total fulfilment.

The island gave significant power to it’s protector, although not unlimited (remember Richard asking Jacob for his wife to come back to life, which Jacob said he could not do) and certainly allowed them to see time as something other than linear, allowing the Stepmother to engineer Jacob and the MIB’s mother arriving, Jacob bringing the Black Pearl there, Jacob engineering key moments of every one of the Losties lives to bring them to Australia to get on Flight 815, and so on. We don’t know how this works and from a storytelling perspective, does it really matter?

The flash sideways world took place outside of linear time altogether. Everyone there was indeed dead, but when and in what order they died we have no idea. It is quite possible that Hugo and Ben could have lived for hundreds or thousands of years on the Island, or that Kate, James, Claire and the rest of the plane passengers returned to the mainland and lived full lives, dying of natural causes decades apart. When they gathered together in the place that they had made, as Christian Sheppard put it, there was no time, and so there was no linear requirement for Jack to have died before or after anyone. If it makes it easier, think that Hugo from the year 3000 came back in time to the leaving party for Jack in 2010, and met up with Boon who had come from 2004. Except they were not actually travelling to the time of the party, and that all events could, once outside of time take place at the same time!

As to the roles they assumed, they all had some variation to the life that they had in the real world. Some were minor such as Kate being suspected of killing an employee of her stepfather, (and which she claimed she was innocent of; not the case in real life), or Hugo enjoying his wealth, all the way up to James, as a cop fulfilling the dream that he always had to avenge his parents death through legitimate means, or Jack having a son to allow his to solve the Father/Son relationship which ruined so much of his real life.

Not everyone was ready or able to move on. Again, Christian made it clear that the Losties had created that place to let go and move on together, which implies there was some choice. Ben was finally unable to accept that he had done enough to go with them at that time. In the same way, Mrs Whitmore knew what was happening, but she was desperate to keep that place going so that she could keep the son she murdered with her until they could move on.

Michael had already appeared on the Island to Hugo and admitted that he was one of many spirits trapped there, unable to leave. We could also guess that Mr Eko, Anna Lucia most of the others, and many more were trapped there because they did not achieve any closure before they died. Or alternatively, and as is more logical to me, they were not closely aligned to Jack and the cause of the Losties, and, in the end their spirit would not have had the will or the right to join the final gathering.

So, to summarise, they did not all die in the 815 plane crash, the events on the Island did happen, we never got to know where the island came from or how it did what it did, and the flash sideways was, in addition to making Jack’s death, a wonderfully uplifting ending, something of a parting gift from the writers to all the fans, as I am sure that every one of us had at some point thought “is it purgatory after all?”. In the end it was not, but we got to see it anyway.

63 sowasred2012
Posted on Tuesday May 25, 2010, 14:53
Magnets. Always with the magnets.

64 Dr Science
Posted on Tuesday May 25, 2010, 15:07
re: petejwheeldon

Dude - full respect. Cogent, coherent and balanced. But I still think that in the scenario you have described, too many critical questions are left unanswered and too many potential red herrings have been confirmed as red herrings - if it was all real then everything should have meant something and it should have been possible to at least hint at the answers. I'm not disputing your explanation - but I think that anyone who feels that the ending wasn't as good as it could have been is entitled to be disappointed.

65 Pauliewilks
Posted on Tuesday May 25, 2010, 15:50
I agree with many of the comments posted here. The ending was typical of the whole series - mystifying, exciting, poignant, and possibly, above all, quite frustrating!

I have always loved watching Lost for the very reason that no one actually knew what the hell was going on - for me, that was the best thing about the show. I watched it for the acting, the writing, the music, the visuals, the moments of jaw-dropping revelations. I never watched it because I wanted to be spoon fed a simple story. I don't care that I don't undertsand the ending. It doesn't matter. So we never got the answers we wanted - neither did most of the characters, especially Jack. But what he did get was a sense of acceptance that life doesn't always supply us with answers, just the knowledge that it is enough to know we were part of something important. And isn't that what us loyal viewers were along? Passengers on a six year journey where the trip was the important thing, not the destination. And at the end of the day, anyone familiar with the show will know enough to interpret the ending in a way most satisfying to themselves. Jack found peace - now so should we.

66 Pauliewilks
Posted on Tuesday May 25, 2010, 15:51
I agree with many of the comments posted here. The ending was typical of the whole series - mystifying, exciting, poignant, and possibly, above all, quite frustrating!

I have always loved watching Lost for the very reason that no one actually knew what the hell was going on - for me, that was the best thing about the show. I watched it for the acting, the writing, the music, the visuals, the moments of jaw-dropping revelations. I never watched it because I wanted to be spoon fed a simple story. I don't care that I don't undertsand the ending. It doesn't matter. So we never got the answers we wanted - neither did most of the characters, especially Jack. But what he did get was a sense of acceptance that life doesn't always supply us with answers, just the knowledge that it is enough to know we were part of something important. And isn't that what us loyal viewers were along? Passengers on a six year journey where the trip was the important thing, not the destination. And at the end of the day, anyone familiar with the show will know enough to interpret the ending in a way most satisfying to themselves. Jack found peace - now so should we.

67 Pauliewilks
Posted on Tuesday May 25, 2010, 15:52
I agree with many of the comments posted here. The ending was typical of the whole series - mystifying, exciting, poignant, and possibly, above all, quite frustrating!

I have always loved watching Lost for the very reason that no one actually knew what the hell was going on - for me, that was the best thing about the show. I watched it for the acting, the writing, the music, the visuals, the moments of jaw-dropping revelations. I never watched it because I wanted to be spoon fed a simple story. I don't care that I don't undertsand the ending. It doesn't matter. So we never got the answers we wanted - neither did most of the characters, especially Jack. But what he did get was a sense of acceptance that life doesn't always supply us with answers, just the knowledge that it is enough to know we were part of something important. And isn't that what us loyal viewers were along? Passengers on a six year journey where the trip was the important thing, not the destination. And at the end of the day, anyone familiar with the show will know enough to interpret the ending in a way most satisfying to themselves. Jack found peace - now so should we.

68 Pauliewilks
Posted on Tuesday May 25, 2010, 15:55
I agree with many of the comments posted here. The ending was typical of the whole series - mystifying, exciting, poignant, and possibly, above all, quite frustrating!

I have always loved watching Lost for the very reason that no one actually knew what the hell was going on - for me, that was the best thing about the show. I watched it for the acting, the writing, the music, the visuals, the moments of jaw-dropping revelations. I never watched it because I wanted to be spoon fed a simple story. I don't care that I don't undertsand the ending. It doesn't matter. So we never got the answers we wanted - neither did most of the characters, especially Jack. But what he did get was a sense of acceptance that life doesn't always supply us with answers, just the knowledge that it is enough to know we were part of something important. And isn't that what us loyal viewers were along? Passengers on a six year journey where the trip was the important thing, not the destination. And at the end of the day, anyone familiar with the show will know enough to interpret the ending in a way most satisfying to themselves. Jack found peace - now so should we.

69 Pauliewilks
Posted on Tuesday May 25, 2010, 15:58
I agree with many of the comments posted here. The ending was typical of the whole series - mystifying, exciting, poignant, and possibly, above all, quite frustrating!

I have always loved watching Lost for the very reason that no one actually knew what the hell was going on - for me, that was the best thing about the show. I watched it for the acting, the writing, the music, the visuals, the moments of jaw-dropping revelations. I never watched it because I wanted to be spoon fed a simple story. I don't care that I don't understand the ending. It doesn't matter. So we never got the answers we wanted - neither did most of the characters, especially Jack. But what he did get was a sense of acceptance that life doesn't always supply us with answers, just the knowledge that it is enough to know we were part of something important. And isn't that what us loyal viewers were along? Passengers on a six year journey where the trip was the important thing, not the destination. And at the end of the day, anyone familiar with the show will know enough to interpret the ending in a way most satisfying to themselves. Jack found peace - now so should we.

70 The Crow
Posted on Tuesday May 25, 2010, 15:59
I went through the same thing you did. Loved the first season but after started missing some episodes and then couldn't be bothered to keep watching it. But then I got back into it from Season 5 and was loving every episode of the last season.

I was completely heart broken with the finale (in a good way!). I can go on forever about it but all I'd like to say is that pretty much any film or show had been about a single person's journey. With Lost, every member of the cast was just as important. How it was Jack who helped all of them attain salvation... this show will always be remembered.

71 Pauliewilks
Posted on Tuesday May 25, 2010, 16:04
Sorry to everyone about the multiple posts above. I think the island's messing with the server! Or the Man in Black is controlling me. Or I'm in purgatory. Or......oh, to Hell with it, I'm off to Heaven! Jack, wait up!!

72 petejwheeldon
Posted on Tuesday May 25, 2010, 16:05
Thanks Dr Science, much appreciated.

Just want to say that I was not trying to justify the final episode, just clarify what I believe actually happened.

Before the episode started I was all ready to meet a mysterious being who would emerge from the centre of the Island and explain what it was all about, have a twist where Hugo would have been the prime motivator of it all, or a lame "computer simulation" type explanation. After enjoying the final moments I was a bit shocked that it was really all over and we didn't actually get any of the answers!

However the more I thought about it, the more I felt that any explanation would be too factual, and whatever it was would have to leave holes, or have some huge get out clause which would debase the whole thing. Better to say that there are some things which don't get resolved.

As a general point, I know some have suggested that the flash sideways ending was a last minute cop out by the writers. I recall seeing an interview with Matthew Fox when the second series was opening, in which he admitted that he did not know what would happen, but that the writers had told him what the final scenes would be, and that it was beautiful and poignant. Certainly sounds like they shot that ending.



73 Kezabien
Posted on Tuesday May 25, 2010, 16:07
If you're wondering about the numbers - in "The Substitute" episode, when they're in the cave, each of the candidates names have a number by their names and the ones not crossed off are 4-8-15-16-23-42.


74 thenarrator
Posted on Tuesday May 25, 2010, 16:59
The ending failed for a couple of reasons: one, there were too many questions left and two, it lacked a significant enough emotional impact given the time we’ve all invested in it.

I completely agree with the poster above who stated that when Jack “replugged” the island there should have been a series of images and flashes that provided a narrative for the islands beginnings and key questions – loose enough that each viewer could interpret in their own way but firm enough to demonstrate that there was a back history and that the occurrences on the island mattered.

Secondly, the final few minutes simply weren’t audacious enough and the reason that so many of us are disappointed is due to this “get out clause” of the after-life place. Essentially a season-long red-herring.

What would have felt significant was that the “after-life” was in fact a re-set timeline following the explosion of the atomic bomb at the end of season five where all the occurrences of the past had taken place but had also been “re-set”.

The Losties should then have met and returned to the island to start afresh, only for in the final few minutes for the audience to learn that in returning to the island they went back centuries in the past and that they in fact were the civilisation that first arrived on the island and that some of them e.g. Jack and Kate gave birth to The Mother character who raises Jacob and MIB.

This would tie into what was once thought that the Adam and Eve characters were actually Penny and Desmond (as suggested by the black and white stones in Desmond’s flat in season 3) but would also be audacious enough to match the show’s nature whilst providing a suitable narrative conclusion to the show.

That's just an example, I'm not saying it HAS to be that ending, but after all this time I was hoping for major questions to be answered and a suitable emotional ending.

75 monkeyinmyhead
Posted on Tuesday May 25, 2010, 17:27
The island wasnt purgatory! Evereything that we saw happen, happened. When Jack died, he saw Kate, Sawyer etc escape, and they went on to live out there lives.

The side flashes are a seperate entity from everything, Jacob wasn't aware of it, it was something they created after they had all died to be together again.

Christian said that some of these people died before Jack, some a long time after. Meaning Kate and the other escapees lived there lives, note Kate saying how much she had missed Jack.

Hurley and Ben making it to the church in the side flashes could of been CENTURIES after, after they had served there time out on the island protecting it. Hence the conversation about ,"You were a good number 2" etc

Remember they said on the island their first task would be getting Desmond home to his wife n kid, we can assume they completed that task.

So, everything we saw, happened, both flash back, flash forward, time travel and the island.

The side flashes were a seperate thing from everything. It was just a nice resolution to see everybody happy and realising that there time on the island fulfilled them, and that being together was what they all wanted.

Ok?

p.s. No Michael because we know that he is trapped on the island for what he did...

76 jazz_24
Posted on Tuesday May 25, 2010, 17:40
thenarrator, I'm so glad you're not a Lost writer, because your ending would really suck!
I loved the ending as it was, sad, uplifting, powerful... it again made me realise how much these characters had grown during the series and how much I had started caring for them.
At the end I no longer cared about who built the statue or who shot whom from the outrigger, I was just glad to see these characters all together and happy for the first time. It was the ending they truly deserved on my part.
They could never have answered all questions, did you really want moments like, "hey remember that scene from season 2? Well, this is what it meant!" I love that the Lost mythology is still out there to be discussed and dissected for years to come. I feel that if the characters didn't need to understand everything they went through, then neither do we.
Like the entire series, The End was flawed, sometimes uneven, maybe even a little forced, but in my book it also was a truly satisfying ending for the richest, most fascinating television series I've ever seen.
I already miss them.

77 Taz69
Posted on Tuesday May 25, 2010, 18:29
A series that quickly turned into one giant cliche machin (an enjoyable one mind) and your right the ending won't appease everyone.
I would have preferred if the Locke/Smokey was fighting a returning Mr Ecko (from season 2) to the death. As Ecko was the coolest character in lost (yes, even beating Sawyer).
Overall it ended like I always thought it would do - Purgatory and they all go to the next level.
It's just a shame that it was the way Ashes to Ashes ended last week so most of the ending felt like it was evenmore cliched than it really was.
It was a good show that lost (take as a pun or not) it's way and now it's over, but it ended on a good note.

78 guydl1987
Posted on Tuesday May 25, 2010, 19:27
mrjones, good call on nominating the Angel finale, Not Fade Away, which is by some distance the best final episode I've ever seen - managed to be every bit as poignant etc etc as Lost but without all the downsides (although to be fair it had far fewer issues to try and resolve, I realise).

Much the same goes for Tomorrow, the excellent final episode of The West Wing, which obviously had the advantage of being able to just say an emotional goodbye without having to address any mysteries whatsoever.

Also, got to agree with whoever it was mentioned The Shield as a great finale (SPOILER ALERT), although I actually thought the penultimate episode was even better, simply because of that scene where he confesses all of his crimes as part of his immunity deal, and there's a fantastic moment where he pauses as he tries to decide where to begin, and you can see the weight of it come down on him as he finally stops to add up all the stuff he's done and justified to himself up to that point.

79 durelius
Posted on Tuesday May 25, 2010, 22:00
I absolutely loved it, watched every episode and the ending certainly hit an emotional note with me, made me feel sad for the characters, made me feel happy that they had all found each other, made me feel sad the show was over.
As there's so much going on throughout all the series my opinion on what it meant changed all the time, it was a show that kept you thinking about the significance of something long after the episode would be over and I will be thinking about this show for a long time to come.
At the moment I think it was all Jacks' struggle to fight for life to stay alive but he was eventually guided towards the light until he eventually realises his fate. Function of the island still not sure but really I think it doesn't matter it could have happened in the middle of Beijing, New York or on an Island near Fiji somewhere.
Really like some of the comments and ideas here but some clearly didn't watch the show with any enthusiasm and or are devoid of emotion

80 lgyyojf
Posted on Tuesday May 25, 2010, 22:58
I know we're meant to have no idea when the "purgatory" bit occurs, but I think it would've been awesome if Hurley and Ben weren't there at the end in the church... meaning they were still guarding the light!

81 moviemaniac-7
Posted on Tuesday May 25, 2010, 23:16
Great ending of a great show. It didn't think its audiences were idiots and it's one of the few shows to do so. I applaud them for that. Now, it's time to start over again and dissect every little detail from the opening shot till the closing shot and have the complete theory mapped out.

82 Woodat34
Posted on Tuesday May 25, 2010, 23:21
At first I was disappointed by "The End", not quite understanding its meaning to the overall show's narrative and past plots. However after thinking about and reading up on other peoples take, I now realise this was a perfect way to end the show.

Throughout the show the meaning and power of the island has been a key theme, the what is that? why are they there? who are they? questions do not matter, as Desmond states in the final episode "non of this matters", in the end it was all about the main characters. The troubles they faced before, and how the island brought all the people together and although there were downs, their lives improved and got better, they found meaning. Each and every character had something they needed to let go of, Hurley's paranoia, Jack's daddy issues and feelings of inadequacy, Sawyer's obsession with Sawyer etc etc. And in the end the story ended with Christian telling Jack "you need to let go" and this was meant as to move on, they all depended on each other to help them let go.

The flashbacks in the episode were among the most emotive scenes of Lost, why at times being too obvious and nostalgic, it only enhances the feeling and importance of the Journey these characters have been on together. They were lonely, they are not anymore. The power of their bond, meant they created a reality in which they all knew each other and could then wait for each other to move on together.

The previous story line and sub-plots had all acted as catalysts in the character development. The Jacob- MIB plot showed how good primarily prevailed, Jack gave his life saving the island which had bonded all of them together, Jacob was right about humans not being all bad.

It was a shame to not see Michael and Walt again however, does anyone have any ideas why they weren't in the church? but the likes of Penny was?

Overall, The End of this show has been the most powerful and brought it back to the feel of season 1 - the characters and their relationships.

83 petejwheeldon
Posted on Wednesday May 26, 2010, 00:58
lgyyojf

Its not that we we are not supposed to know "when" it occured, but rather that it did not occur at a time at all. It was a place they created to come back together.

Incidentally, did Ben decide to stay in part because his daughter did not have her moment of revelation? Did he need to stay behind to complete his task and let her see what happended and move on with him?

84 crazymoviesdude
Posted on Wednesday May 26, 2010, 09:29
Someone said it before; the flashsideways timeline turned out to be a red herring. That is what it was. You can all go on about how wonderful, and emotional and fulfilling it was to see all the cast reunited, but I really think you are just kidding yourselves. I'm not trying to patronise (doesn't mean you can't still feel I am though), I've done the same thing so many times. For weeks after King Kong I was madly in love with it and I ignored all it's flaws, but after I let it sink in, I realised it was good, but not as good as it could/should have been.

It is the same with Lost. I've sat through every episode just like most of you, (and anyone who would call me a Lost-hater would be the opposite of correct) and I wanted this finale to be as great as all of you, and as great as some of you seem to think it was, but it serves no purpose to pretend it was better than it was. I could very nearly have done the same thing, all the way through, even though there was a wealth of cliched dialogue and really plastic looking falling rocks, I kept saying to myself 'this is great, this is great', but then the end came, and I realised that one whole half of this season had been an absolute con, and really, could have been taken out all together.

I really, truly believe, that anyone who says it was magical and mystical and emotional and any other such things, either just watched the season 3 ending, or you are just not wanting to believe that you wasted 6 years of your life on this. The sooner you come to terms with it (like I and some others have), the sooner we can all just forget this ever happened.

85 crazymoviesdude
Posted on Wednesday May 26, 2010, 09:29
Someone said it before; the flashsideways timeline turned out to be a red herring. That is what it was. You can all go on about how wonderful, and emotional and fulfilling it was to see all the cast reunited, but I really think you are just kidding yourselves. I'm not trying to patronise (doesn't mean you can't still feel I am though), I've done the same thing so many times. For weeks after King Kong I was madly in love with it and I ignored all it's flaws, but after I let it sink in, I realised it was good, but not as good as it could/should have been.

It is the same with Lost. I've sat through every episode just like most of you, (and anyone who would call me a Lost-hater would be the opposite of correct) and I wanted this finale to be as great as all of you, and as great as some of you seem to think it was, but it serves no purpose to pretend it was better than it was. I could very nearly have done the same thing, all the way through, even though there was a wealth of cliched dialogue and really plastic looking falling rocks, I kept saying to myself 'this is great, this is great', but then the end came, and I realised that one whole half of this season had been an absolute con, and really, could have been taken out all together.

I really, truly believe, that anyone who says it was magical and mystical and emotional and any other such things, either just watched the season 3 ending, or you are just not wanting to believe that you wasted 6 years of your life on this. The sooner you come to terms with it (like I and some others have), the sooner we can all just forget this ever happened.

86 crazymoviesdude
Posted on Wednesday May 26, 2010, 09:30
Sorry for the double, stupid server error.

87 AntoineGeagea
Posted on Wednesday May 26, 2010, 10:17
Am I the only one on the planet who actually gets this?!?!?!

There is no distinct pre-island/pre-death reality and an island/purgatory reality or Sideways/bridge-to-the-after-life reality.

It's all part of the samsara. Of the same reality. Of one whole existence with consecutive cycles of birth & rebirth until the final epiphany. A cosmic playground, a chessboard where lifeforms dwell & vie for redemption before moving on.

The whole journey of our protagonists from the pilot onwards is happening in a collective construct with all events guiding them towards each other & towards their acceptance to finally move on.

Which makes the "special" attributes off-island of Walt, Miles, etc... & Kate's horse, Locke's dad (the real Sawyer) on island, fit into the puzzle just as well as Jack's neck snip in the Sideways timeline.

The seemingly omniscience of Eloise Hawkins is also another aberrance of the system where she somehow retains the memories of her multiple reiterations.


The writers seem to have drawn their philosophy mainly from the theory of eternal recurrence (or return) with the added Buddhist concept of the finality of enlightenment and fulfillment of crossing over after redemption.

Though some of the characters weren't ready yet for what comes next, (Anna-Lucia, Ben, Daniel...) they are on their own path of slate-cleaning & earning passage. And since we were only following Jack's journey, the rest of our "Churchies" might have taken several life-cycles before joining him in that last timeline.

An interesting dynamic is the disjointed notion of time which echoes the writers' disregard of linear narrative with flashbacks, forwards & sideways. This is a common theme in Buddhist philosophy where our perception of the unilateral flow of time is but a flaw of the human mind. Where everything happens simultaneously.

88 AntoineGeagea
Posted on Wednesday May 26, 2010, 10:17
A last note on how the characters attained that final revelation only after finding each other, & sidelining the irrelevance of what they they perceived as real with all the illusory familial bonds, loved ones & personal ties.

Whichever reiteration it is, our core characters seem to be drawn together & guided towards that final denouement, regardless of other distractions.

As if enlightenment only happens when you find where you belong.

As if the only purpose is to keep doing it until you're united with whom you were bound to.

They belonged together. They were bound together. They were each other's "constant".





Live together, die alone.

Move on together.


Food for thought.

89 NELLY77
Posted on Wednesday May 26, 2010, 10:59
I quite enjoyed the finale for the emotional rollercoaster that it was, but I'm just not sure when they are supposed to of died was it the plane crash or when they dropped the bomb down the well in the 70s? When was it real and when was it Heaven limbo land? Then off course What wer the numbers about? polar bears? what was the Island? what about Michael and Walt?. I could go on but yes I did enjoy but I am seriously frustrated

90 Woodat34
Posted on Wednesday May 26, 2010, 11:42
NELLY77, they didn't die in the initial 815 plane or when the bomb went of in the 70's, some died on the island such as Boone, Shannon, Sayid, Sun, Jin, Jack, Charlie, and Locke died of the island when he was murdered by Ben. However we are left to assume other characters lives such as Kate, Sawyer, Claire and Hurley, continued well after Jack's death. Hurley became the new Jacob for what we assume is a long time, as he says to Ben "you made a great number 2". We can only guess the others made it of the island on the Ajira plane and made it to safety, living their respective lives. But because in purgatory there is no "now" according to christian shepherd, when they died does not matter, it was a place built by all of them so they could come to terms with death and move on together.

91 crazymoviesdude
Posted on Wednesday May 26, 2010, 12:27
@AntoineGeagea either you are going forsoem kind of irony, or you are incredibly self important and deluded. There is no over-arching spiritual pan-reality spanning all of Lost. They had very little idea about the way anything would play out for the whole first half or the series. Initially it was just supposed to be a more elaborate version of Castaway, with the occasional oddity mixed in such as the polar bear. You can try and talk down to everyone about the fact that they don't 'get' what you do, but the fact is, you are massively over thinking this. I know it's hard to believe, but the brilliance that was (not is) Lost, started out as an overblown rehash of a Tom Hanks movie and then slowly added little bits of mythology here and there, most of it, it turns out, leading nowhere, only added to make the show seem mysterious, and it worked. But to suggest that there is some huge cosmic plan that intertwines all, might be a nice idea, but I think you're just projecting a better notion of what Lost was, because you're sad about the finale, like me.

92 hurley5
Posted on Wednesday May 26, 2010, 13:39
I'd also like to add that it was one hell of a program :) and i liked that in the end they had key things from the start such as the shoe hanging on the bamboo ( but whos shoe was that in the first place ? ) but overall awesome :D. thanks for making me miss six years of my life trying to firgure it all out haha :)

93 Paddy Kieran
Posted on Wednesday May 26, 2010, 15:49
I could have written better myself....we were all conned....I loved every week of it while it was on....because I thought it was going somewhere...........if any other show had of done this to us we would be slating it right now....but because it was done with high production value and pretty people we feel like it was a reasonable ending...........I will never commit to watching another show with these writers again...months of trying to figure out where the polar bears came from....or who were the Dharma initiative.......or what was the significance of the numbers........only to be told none of it matters and it was all some sort of test to see who gets into Heaven or not.....pllllllllllllllllllllease! never again....even the actors will always remind me of the 6 years of time TV stole from me....at least its thought me life's too short to spend it hanging on the words of imbeciles.......feel very angry and cheated.....will not be recommending the box set to anyone I like.

94 thenarrator
Posted on Wednesday May 26, 2010, 16:04
Jazz24 – I appreciate that you didn’t like the ending I suggested and as I said, I wasn’t saying that should be the ending. You’re quite right, I’m not a TV writer. But the sheer number of comments across the web show that a vast number of viewers felt short-changed by an ending that was little more than an actor’s reunion.

My point was that given the nature of the show and the fundamentals that it was started on (the fundamentals that made it love it so much) to conclude with an ending that was predicted by many as early as season 1 was very disappointing.

What the show needed was something as bold and daring as season 3’s ending. This “everyone is happy in a new spiritual plane” was mawkish nonsense and not emotional on any level. Vincent Wire’s summary above is spot on. After all this time invested viewers were short-changed.

Hurley5 – the tennis shoe hanging from the bushes was worn by Christian. Somewhere in season 5 there is an episode where Jack explains that he didn’t buy a pair of decent shoes for his father to wear in the coffin. That’s why Christian wears white shoes when he appears as ghost to Jack on the island.

95 Gethin23
Posted on Wednesday May 26, 2010, 16:25
I thought it was an excellent finale for a Season, but a very poor finale for a TV show.

Like everyone else I feel that there are too many unanswered questions; the numbers, Dharma, Jacob able to travel off the island, but most importantly Walt!

I think the writers kept coming up with ideas to keep the audience, and could not string them together at the end. They informed the fans early on that they knew where the story would go and how it would end, so in that case most of the questions should have been answered.

I have watched every episode since the first season and even though I am very disappointed, I don't feel cheated. It was a good show, I enjoyed watching it every week (even though there were times when I only watched it to find out the ending!).

At least it wasn't cancelled, and they would've had to end it quicker!

96 Bates
Posted on Wednesday May 26, 2010, 18:05
I totally agree with boredbluekoala. The show was brilliant, the ending was brilliant, it answered 90% of the questions for me and the other 10% I can decide for myself. I watched the end of it and found myself smiling and contented. good work on all accounts.

97 Neo_One
Posted on Wednesday May 26, 2010, 20:53
I pretty much filmed a YouTube video summing up my thoughts to Lost as per this article so it feels kind of nice and vindicated in what you're thinking. I think the bottom line is that people are discussing it. By the very nature as the blog explains of a sprawling 6 series epic, they couldn't answer everything. Walt was the biggest plot device gone wrong in history, the significance of the numbers that won the lottery but were also on the button that Desmond pushed - it's all too hard and wrapped up in it's own exposition.

You have to forgive some things! I'm a lifer not an obsessive, which means I invested in all the episodes in all the series but I can't quote lines or remember everything to be outraged about, I had to let it go. What's interesting is that I nearly gave up around season four because 'they just didn't answer anything' but by that stage, four years of my life had gone...so I just had to see it till the end or until it got canned.

That's the other interesting point made in this article. All too often American shows just get canned and there is no conclusion to feel satisfied or dissatisfied about...and that is the most dissatisfying thing [if you're still with me ;-)]

I remember Six Feet Under as having quite simply the best ending to a series I've ever seen. Three series long, the characters all lived out their lives in front of us in the final ten minutes and it was beautiful, touching and felt ... satisfying (to now over-use the word) but I think you have to be an emotive person to have bought into the characters and the story in the first place.

How many people that have responded watch comic book films? Oh and how many times have you complained that Superman's powers weren't well explained enough - you can't, it's science fiction, it's a comic, it's not real and guess what, Lost wasn't real either.

In 37 years, I can't remember a series of such writing quality - I'm more sad that I might not see something of this scale again!

98 neofunk2001
Posted on Wednesday May 26, 2010, 22:04
I have always been a big Lost fan and have always defended it but I really felt short changed this season.I love the characterisation but if being honest it is the mythology which hooked me.I was not looking for everything to be wrapped up in a bow but the writers totally side stepping major plot mysteries that were being building up for six seasons.This show’s that they have being making it up from season to season.Darlton said the Adam and Eve reveal would prove that they had planned this from season 1 bullshit.MIB and “mommy” really was an after thought stemming from the deus ex machina that was the introduction of Jacob in season 3.The story telling this season has been mainly filler with little answers that were given were mainly flat “The Whispers” what a joke.I have always said that Lost as a whole hinged on the last season but as we found out it was spit in the face.It is the fan’s that have made Lost what it is with theories and research making it a very interactive experience which I love and will miss but we were being hoodwinked,actually with some fans theories being better than what panned out.There was just so much that could not be answered to give a satisfactory resolution.For ppl to say it’s the characters that matter and not the answers is bullshit if i wanted to watch a show about only the characters i would have watched a soap.Why should we just accept lazy writing and allowing the writers an easy copout.I was looking forward to a full rewatch knowing where the interweaving story was going as a whole.Spotting all the different things through out that proved the plot was dilectly preconceived all along as we were led to believe.Not that it was being made off the cuff season to season.A rewatch now will just show all the things that ultimately led nowhere i just feel a lot of what has come before was tarnished by the laziness of the writers and under estimation of the fan’s intelligence.I expected some things to be left open for debate but not 70%

99 neofunk2001
Posted on Wednesday May 26, 2010, 22:06
continued.....of the mythology in this promised season of answers. I would have loved a flashback episode of the Egyptian period of the island’s history and that it would have been integral to the story’s arc maybe even being the Genesis of Jacob/Flocke.They will never explain what the island is we just got a McGuffin cave of light that if anything else was the one question that needed to be answered.They just thought of a way to have the Purgatory ending which was planned all along and changing enough so the island was not Purgatory and they could say “see we did not lie and we caught you suckers As the Dude said ” I just wanted the rug that tied the room together” but what I got was the rug which the writers shat on.Darlton and Cuse laughing all the way to the bank while giving us a big FUCK YOU

100 reinhardt76
Posted on Thursday May 27, 2010, 10:24
sooooo...which ones the pilot of the jumbo jet?

101 crazymoviesdude
Posted on Thursday May 27, 2010, 10:25
I really don't think it was anyone's intention to upset fans. There was no 'laughing all the way to the bank while giving us a big FUCK YOU' ,they just had to end it somehow, and they really had written themselves into a corner. Everyone who is upset, isn't annoyed that a few answers are missing, we expected that. We are annoyed that, as neo said, 70% of them are missing. I am really annoyed that I feel this way. I was really hoping, like everyone else, that this would be fantastic, and it would reward me for 6 years of loyalty.

It's a common notion that hardcore fans are never going to be happy. That they know the mythology so well and are so fanatical about the show that nothing will ever live up to their expectations. I really don't think this is teh case. I've had many personal instances where, BECAUSE I was so fanatical and absolutely in love with something, I couldn't let it not be satisfying. I mentioned Kng Kong earlier, and for me that was my apologist film. Many people are apologists of the Matrix sequels, and often, they descend into patronising diatribes about how their opposition doesn't 'get it', but in reality they are just hiding from the truth that in the end, everything wasn't worth it, and it didn't all add up, and that is what is happening now.

There was no grand plan. There were mini plans that were thought out and came to a neat conclusion, but they had already been fulfilled way before the finale. Then there were the little things that became burning questions for the audience eg egytptian temples, food drops, Walt's powers, which ultimately were not answered. Someone earlier said that most shows aren't laid out from beginning to end, and often just go from episode to episode, but those shows don't have huge themes, a mountain of characters, and a mass of devoted fans.

This was a show that needed to be laid out from the off, but we all knew it wasn't, and then we are surprised that all roads didn't lead to Rome. I guess we shouldnt be.

102 mozzy_gal
Posted on Thursday May 27, 2010, 12:11
Sooo.....about 121 hours of your life you're never gonna get back then? Ha!

And what the HELL is A 'flash-sideways'?!

Well, let's thank the Lord it's all over now.

103 The_Administrator
Posted on Thursday May 27, 2010, 13:02
No answers whatsoever about The Island. That's The Island that has been the star of the show throughout all of the series. Nothing about the Dharma Initiative's tests on The Island; no reason for Charles Widmore's desire to return to The Island; no information about the importance of the numbers 4 8 15 16 23 42; no actual explanation as to what any of the stations on The Island were; No info on why it could move through time.
However, the characters' stories were good - the 'flash sideways' obviously a chance for redemption - egotistical surgeon Jack finding love for his son; conman Sawyer fighting for good with the police; Ben - so desperate to be the chosen one, the leder - dishing out knowledge as a teacher.

104 JonathanMardukas
Posted on Friday May 28, 2010, 09:41
Can someone explain how the man in black became the evil one?? The episode with Alison Janny shows that she was the evil one trapping him on the island, Jacob throwing him into the cave and destroying him. All he wanted to do was get off the island to go back to where he came from. I understand that he was attempting to kill everyone in the end in order to get off there but basically this was all brought on him by Jacob and his mother wasnt it?? So can someone please explain this....

105 smakris04
Posted on Friday May 28, 2010, 10:50
I just feel sad for the finale. Sad because We got to learn nothing important from the show overall. They created a universe they didn't explain.

Was lost named lost for the time we lost watching it?

I think so.

106 DeusMaximus
Posted on Friday May 28, 2010, 16:02
I have tried to think up an ending that might work better for a lot of people, and you can still have the purgatory / happy go lucky ending thing flashing along.

Ok here goes: Bear in mind that this also means that final season would have had a different feel / flow. A little bit like when they introduced the life and death of the people of Linus. Ok: The end is a classic Good vs. Evil scenario. Good being a broad concept, evil being smokey or the embodiment of Evil. Of course Good can also be embodied by Hurley or let's say Jacob / the Candidates.

Picture this: The year is unknown but we see a world that has a high level of technology but also architecture that reminds of the temple and the structure the MIB shows his "mother".

We soon learn the people of this world have a problem. They are at the peak of their technology and culture. They are however faced by a growing evil within the people. The scientists are the first to see this and they devise a plan to take out the evil out of the people. If they do not succeed, then they know their civilization will die in turmoil. (Yes Star Trek fan)

They finally succeed in their method and they are able to literally make evil have substance, but they also create an entity. The evil proves too difficult to contain and their solution might even be their undoing. They decide to create a "prison" for the evil. An Island far far away from them without any people. This is of course "the island".

They send a contingent of people, all from Atlantis with the evil to try to make the prison eternal. Of course the evil plays mind tricks with its captors and slowly they also turn on themselves and so on. But in the meantime they are able to make the temple and a well that serves as a life prolonging device. (Yes Cocoon) See post 2 for more

107 DeusMaximus
Posted on Friday May 28, 2010, 16:08
Finally a small group of people are left, mostly scientist. They discover that by creating EMP they can "stick" evil to its magnetic power. They are aware that the properties of the island combined with the EMP mean:

- Prolonged life from a certain age (explains why certain people do not change appearance, but do grow up). Of course being knifed by a guy that is angry is a deal breaker :-)
- The containment device or apparatus causes women to have miscarriages and that answers that question. But of course living forever gets boring, so they either leave the island or get substitutes for their places, guiding them and so on

Being from Atlantis they also have ancient tech, but they soon learn that Atlantis has been destroyed by their own undoing. So they are on their own. The tech gets worse by wear and tear. Certain weapons and tech does survive, and those weapons are used by "the mother" to kill the people MiB is connected to.

This also means there is tech that can be used by the caretaker to find replacements (candidates) and to actually “project” himself to other places with not leaving the island. And also being able to interact in those places. The way the candidate learns are through data disc that can be activated by the EMP, thus also being able to operate.

But as time goes by Evil can influence people to go to the island researching stuff, but also causing the EMP to weaken and Evil becoming smokey. Of course Jacob also applies a counterforce. When they activate the EMP device (the light in the cavern) 2 of the team die, leaving only the "mother" of Jacob and Also Atlantis being, in legend, responsible for sending out their scientist to different parts of the word, bringing to Europe (in essence) the Latin Language. The Dharma Initiative has found references about the island and so on. Brought forth by evil or good. I think this would have answered almost all the questions and would have been a much cooler satisfactory ending. What do you think? :-)

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